Linked by Andrew Youll on Sun 17th Jul 2005 13:32 UTC, submitted by Rodrigo
Linux The picotux 100 is the world's smallest Linux computer, only slightly larger (35mm×19mm×19mm) than an RJ45 connector.
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Imagine
by Anonymous on Sun 17th Jul 2005 13:53 UTC
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A beowulf cluster of these.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Imagine
by justin on Sun 17th Jul 2005 14:05 UTC in reply to "Imagine"
justin Member since:
2005-07-12

A beowulf cluster of 50mhz systems... BLAZING!

- j

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Imagine
by Anonymous on Sun 17th Jul 2005 14:22 UTC in reply to "RE: Imagine"
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A beowulf cluster of 50mhz systems... BLAZING!

It's 55mhz. That 5mhz makes all the difference. ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE: Imagine
by Anonymous on Sun 17th Jul 2005 18:25 UTC in reply to "Imagine"
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that only works on slashdot... oh! wait...

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: Imagine
by Ronald Vos on Sun 17th Jul 2005 21:01 UTC in reply to "RE: Imagine"
Ronald Vos Member since:
2005-07-06

He just beat me to it.

Reply Score: 1

v Just to nitpick
by ma_d on Sun 17th Jul 2005 13:56 UTC
hmm...
by hobgoblin on Sun 17th Jul 2005 14:00 UTC
hobgoblin
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2005-07-06

i wonder if i can get this to act as a router of some sort if i can get it to handle two ethernet connections.

maybe it dont have the cpu of that tho.

Reply Score: 1

web server
by Rodrigo on Sun 17th Jul 2005 14:03 UTC
Rodrigo
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2005-07-06

Might be funny to put a webserver on it and get instant feedback from devices..or make it log network activity "straight from the cow's mouth".

Reply Score: 2

Uhh... trivial?
by justin on Sun 17th Jul 2005 14:04 UTC
justin
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2005-07-12

What is a realistic use for such a device?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Uhh... trivial?
by Rodrigo on Sun 17th Jul 2005 14:08 UTC in reply to "Uhh... trivial?"
Rodrigo Member since:
2005-07-06

Network monitoring, device monitoring, telnet, webserver...

Reply Score: 1

Little Chips
by zizban on Sun 17th Jul 2005 14:19 UTC
zizban
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2005-07-06

Not quite as small but pretty cool:
http://www.littlechips.com/

Reply Score: 1

RE: Little Chips
by zombie process on Sun 17th Jul 2005 18:47 UTC in reply to "Little Chips"
zombie process Member since:
2005-07-08

Much cooler actually. Teeny is neat, but that thing is awesome!

Reply Score: 1

Interesting
by dswain on Sun 17th Jul 2005 14:21 UTC
dswain
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2005-07-03

The thing is though, I'd be really scared of losing it. I guess at any rate, you've got some very good reasoning to have it if you do buy it. The price is $240 USD which is a fair amount of cash. I guess telnet could control it via ethernet if you wanted to instead of using the null modem. Is it possible to strip an SSH binary down to a size which would fit on here? I don't think it would be, but it'd be neat to see.

Reply Score: 1

...
by Anonymous on Sun 17th Jul 2005 15:07 UTC
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Nice!

Anyway for a cluster I'd rather take the chip only and mount 20 or so on a PCB.

- Morin

Reply Score: 0

v Linux
by Anonymous on Sun 17th Jul 2005 17:20 UTC
RE: Linux
by orestes on Sun 17th Jul 2005 17:26 UTC in reply to "Linux"
orestes Member since:
2005-07-06

I was thinking more along the lines of something that can really take advantage of a massively distributed system. QNX, Plan 9, or Inferno would be ideal candidates for that sort of thing.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Linux
by Phil on Sun 17th Jul 2005 19:43 UTC in reply to "Linux"
Phil Member since:
2005-07-06

Menuet? As in the _x86_ assembly OS?

Might need a little bit of porting to run on this thing, as it has an ARM processor...

Reply Score: 1

RE: Linux
by Anonymous on Sun 17th Jul 2005 20:19 UTC in reply to "Linux"
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Just because it has 30 million lines of code, that doesn't mean they'll all be used. You can choose what to compile in and out, so only a small fraction of them would be used for something like this.

Reply Score: 2

RFID
by pythonhacker on Sun 17th Jul 2005 17:27 UTC
pythonhacker
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2005-07-07

Perhaps systems like these will help RFID adoption on Linux. Seems to be a good match for RFID to me.

Reply Score: 1

needs dual LAN jacks
by pravda on Sun 17th Jul 2005 17:44 UTC
pravda
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2005-07-06

Dual LAN would make all sorts of interesting out-of-band apps possible with these tiny devices.

Reply Score: 1

RE: needs dual LAN jacks
by klynch on Sun 17th Jul 2005 17:52 UTC in reply to "needs dual LAN jacks"
klynch Member since:
2005-07-06

right on. with 2 LAN jacks, there a bunch of applications, both good and bad. For instance, you could have a tiny firewall or (more likely) you could have a device to sniff data going through a network connection.

Reply Score: 1

Mac Mini
by Anonymous on Sun 17th Jul 2005 18:48 UTC
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Mac Mini eat your heart out!

Reply Score: 0

case
by collinm on Sun 17th Jul 2005 19:02 UTC
collinm
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2005-07-15

there is no case to protect the machine?

Reply Score: 1

quite a few choices it seems
by pravda on Sun 17th Jul 2005 20:12 UTC
pravda
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2005-07-06

http://www.linuxdevices.com/articles/AT8498487406.html

this one gives you the full dual gbit --
http://www.gms4sbc.com/OtherFF.html

gives you an idea if apple had ditched the 5.25" optical drive how small they could have made the mac mini.

Reply Score: 1

RE: quite a few choices it seems
by Ronald Vos on Sun 17th Jul 2005 21:08 UTC in reply to "quite a few choices it seems"
Ronald Vos Member since:
2005-07-06

this one gives you the full dual gbit --
http://www.gms4sbc.com/OtherFF.html


What's the price on that one? Those corporate sites are always so unhelpful.

Reply Score: 1

RE: quite a few choices it seems
by klynch on Sun 17th Jul 2005 22:24 UTC in reply to "quite a few choices it seems"
klynch Member since:
2005-07-06

not to take credit away from your link, but this one beats all of them when it comes to size. It's only as big as an RJ45 connector!

some of those SBCs are really cool and much more powerful. i'd just hate to see the pricetag on them...

Reply Score: 1

re: other small computers
by pravda on Sun 17th Jul 2005 21:38 UTC
pravda
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2005-07-06

The one from GMS is probably expensive. Their Pentium M board was quite expensive if I remember.

Generally any site that does not state the price means "it will cost more than what is reasonable and we need to convince you to pay up".

It may be a better/cheaper bet to go higher volume and get a VIA-based dual LAN board.

Reply Score: 1

Ideas
by kmarius on Sun 17th Jul 2005 21:48 UTC
kmarius
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2005-06-30

1. This would be the ideal computer for a toy robot.

2. You could put a network camera+picotux in a RC model car and stream the pictures via WLAN. You could then control the car from the computer. Perhaps also combine it with idea 1.

Reply Score: 1

Dual LAN jacks
by Anonymous on Sun 17th Jul 2005 22:20 UTC
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Right, 2 RJ45s and you have a simple firewall or bridge. Slap an IDS or sniffer on it and voila. But its still a bit limited...

Reply Score: 0

sbc vs lan jack size
by pravda on Mon 18th Jul 2005 03:57 UTC
pravda
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2005-07-06

Okay, so you cannot get a 48-port 10/100 POE switch and plug 48 computers in your computing grid...

However, those SBC machines could easily go in a nice little stack, support GigE, and can run any kind of Linux you want. Today.

Maybe the Lan plug machines have some good uses, but it is hard to imagine what they are vs. the larger micro-itx designs.

Reply Score: 1

Gigabit
by Anonymous on Mon 18th Jul 2005 07:02 UTC
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Is 55 Mhz enough to process the data flowing thorough Gigabit ethernet channel?

Reply Score: 0

re:
by Anonymous on Mon 18th Jul 2005 14:30 UTC
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"What is a realistic use for such a device?"

Industrial monitoring. A lot of industrial devices output by serial. I could see one of these on each machine talking back to a central server updating on each machines status.

Reply Score: 0

lantronix
by Anonymous on Mon 18th Jul 2005 16:29 UTC
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I used a something similar for a "realtime" network based control system.

http://www.lantronix.com/device-networking/embedded-device-servers/...

wireless would be fun too..

http://www.lantronix.com/device-networking/embedded-device-servers/...

Reply Score: 0

Gumstix
by Anonymous on Mon 18th Jul 2005 20:31 UTC
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How about a gumstix computer, they are pretty small and run linux...

http://www.gumstix.com

Reply Score: 0

Very cool
by Smartpatrol on Mon 18th Jul 2005 21:57 UTC
Smartpatrol
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2005-07-06

But I agree if it had dual RJ45 connectors then it would be useful as a nat/firewall telnet/ssh server. Other wise perhaps a very compact small website.

Reply Score: 1

wait a bit
by transputer_guy on Tue 19th Jul 2005 20:08 UTC
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2005-07-08

While this ARM module is undoubtledly very cool, for the cost you don't really get much compute power so its barely worth talking about clustering. For some deep embedded use, it does what it does well enough.

A miniITX format or PC104 or even a full size credit card format has enough space to host a great many smaller cpus and share the peripheral costs.

To get tiny cluster performance that will need a different instruction set (not x86 or ARM) that can be built into FPGA or ASIC and run much faster then it can clustered within that divice and more outside.

The problem will always be that real horsepower will always produce heat, but newer designs are going to be much more efficient at delivering useful work without turning into heating systems.

Reply Score: 1