Linked by Andrew Youll on Tue 26th Jul 2005 06:13 UTC
General Development Have you considered setting up a PHP 5 on your Linux server, but not had the time to learn how? This article will help guide you through the installation of a PHP 5 environment using the industry's first integrated PHP environment that includes the IBMCloudscape database server. Installation and configuration is greatly simplified using Zend Core for IBM compared to setting up a complete development and deployment environment from scratch.
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v Availability
by ValiantSoul on Tue 26th Jul 2005 06:34 UTC
RE: Availability
by ValiantSoul on Tue 26th Jul 2005 06:35 UTC in reply to "Availability"
ValiantSoul Member since:
2005-07-20

Wow I'm tired - of course - AMD 64 can run x86!

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Availability
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 12:39 UTC in reply to "RE: Availability"
Anonymous Member since:
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And x86_64... You must _really_ be tired...

Reply Score: 0

v RE: Availability
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 08:07 UTC in reply to "Availability"
v PHP
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 06:46 UTC
RE: PHP
by ValiantSoul on Tue 26th Jul 2005 06:49 UTC in reply to "PHP"
ValiantSoul Member since:
2005-07-20

Care to back up your claim? Its been much easier for me to create my personal website with database support in that than say perl or python (and yes I have tried)

Reply Score: 1

Zend Core - Great PHP 5 distro
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 07:24 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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I tried Zend Core for IBM - This is an excellent PHP distribution, extreamly easy to install and configure. It took me less than 5 minutes to set a server comparing to the serveral hours I previously spent to bring my PHP environment up and running.
The distribution is support by IBM and Zend and it will definetly enhance the use of PHP in professional environments.

Reply Score: 1

Installation is horror
by Buck on Tue 26th Jul 2005 08:02 UTC
Buck
Member since:
2005-06-29

I just finished installing PHP5 on FreeBSD, it was unnecessarily hard. PHP itself installs fine, but apache2 module won't by default, and neither will PostgreSQL support. To do this you must manually run configure with --with-apxs2filter --with-pgsql --with-tsrm-pth. For some reason Makefile flags don't work, and it had to break on me in the middle of the night. By far it was the most obscure port to install...

Reply Score: 1

Hours to setup
by MrEcho on Tue 26th Jul 2005 08:07 UTC
MrEcho
Member since:
2005-07-07

I know know what distro your running, or what your trying to do, but it doesnt take hours on any server to setup, even for first timers.
Setting up Apache is still a pain, something that this app doesnt help you with. Not that Ive seen anyways.
Getting a LAMP computer up and running isnt hard at all.

Reply Score: 1

Question
by kaiwai on Tue 26th Jul 2005 10:08 UTC
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

I know the usual thing is to use MySQL, HOWEVER, is it possible to use another SQL database with it? how about Ingres? Firebird?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Question
by Devon on Tue 26th Jul 2005 11:14 UTC in reply to "Question"
Devon Member since:
2005-06-30

--- "I know the usual thing is to use MySQL, HOWEVER, is it possible to use another SQL database with it? how about Ingres? Firebird?"

Absolutely! Look for your database of choice in the function reference:

http://www.php.net/manual/en/funcref.php

Reply Score: 1

Rob
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 11:54 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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I can't see any value in this product!!

Apart from what looks like a PHPMyADMIN style db maintainance page, and 'easier' installation, what does this ibm/zend package add to the existing, regular php/apache? If there was a way to deploy and manage websites, that would be cool.

Reply Score: 0

Why bother with PHP at all?
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 12:29 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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The only "ADVANTAGE" it offers is the ability to mix code and content, which among professional circles is seen as a bad thing. ASP.NET is a million times better, or if you're stuck in Linux Perl or Python would be better.

Reply Score: 5

v RE: Why bother with PHP at all?
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 12:44 UTC in reply to "Why bother with PHP at all?"
RE: Why bother with PHP at all?
by unoengborg on Tue 26th Jul 2005 16:47 UTC in reply to "Why bother with PHP at all?"
unoengborg Member since:
2005-07-06

You can write bad code in any language, that doesn't mean that you have to. Today php is a very good object oriented language and it is very easy to separate code and content. Just check out PHPTAL http://phptal.motion-twin.com/

The only major problem I see in PHP5 is the lack of name spaces. This makes it hard to build large systems without getting unintuitive class names. It also makes it harder to share code between projects without class name clashes.

Reply Score: 1

Anonymous Member since:
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It looks like PHP is finally getting a basic Model 2 framework -- years after Struts began the framework explosion. (I say basic because these PHP frameworks still lack things like declarative validation, etc. that become easy to implement once you have the Model 2 design in place.) Unfortunately for PHP, the rest of the web development world has moved on to component-based frameworks. WebObjects, Tapestry, JSF, ASP.NET, and many other similar frameworks are the current trend, and PHP remains years behind.

Reply Score: 0

Re: Why Bother. . .
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 12:53 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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You _can_ mix "code and content"
You are not _required_ to.

I'm not an anything zealot but I have been involved in building some genuinely useful (and fairly sophisticated) intranet projs. using LAM(PHP) and we did it to Best Practice. . .

PHP isn't going to _stop_ you from _designing_ a project correctly rather than just junking out some spaghetti. . .

Reply Score: 1

v IP: 142.161.71.
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 12:54 UTC
DB abstraction
by Joao on Tue 26th Jul 2005 13:11 UTC
Joao
Member since:
2005-07-26

How is Database abstraction in PHP these days btw. ?
When i was looking into it a while ago there was none yet. atleast none native. Has this improved yet or does it still have separate mysql_connect/pgsql_connect variants to get database connectivity ?

This has always been what kept me away from php, aswell as the fact most applications written in php tend to have SQL inside the HTML code.. What makes it really ugly to adapt them to my personal taste. I guess thats what is meant here by the separation between model and view (code and content).. Maybe its not mandatory but it seems to be regular practice. I must honestly say its been a while since i have been looking at php.

Reply Score: 1

RE: DB abstraction
by unoengborg on Tue 26th Jul 2005 16:56 UTC in reply to "DB abstraction"
unoengborg Member since:
2005-07-06

There will be a new native DB abstraction thing in PHP5.1. In the current veresion you have an abstraction layer written in PHP in the pear libraries.

Reply Score: 1

Re: DB Abstraction
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 13:34 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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Me from the Re: Why bother post. . .

DB Abstraction was a concern (this was 3 years ago now).
The project I mentioned was "porting" (loose usage here) a Natural/ADABAS app running on, I believe OS/390. (I'm not a mainframe guy so apologies if that makes no good sense).

The reason for the port was that the N/A app was full of (lets call him) "Dan-code". That's how the MF analyst referred to it. He had done smart-numbers, the thing had wrecked out on artifically imposed limits due to the smart number space and fixing the "Dan-code" was deemed to be More Trouble Than Its Worth. The customers were ready for a modern interface as well.

Back to the DB. So what we did is code up a lightweight DB abstraction layer on top of which sat a small framework for Object<->RDBMS convervsions. . .add app-level objects. . .there you go. They also got full Docs on the framework/API.

Now, this wasn't a big app but it did have a couple of hundered users who _live_ in the thing. Its 75% of their job. Cost was 0 compared to further dev. of the old one and uptime has been down 3 hours in 3 years due to an ill-sized UPS. Replication was "good enough" for the environment. . .

It was one of those projects that makes you smile b/c it was such a good fit for the use case. Anyway, that's how we handled the DB: we rolled our own. Not ideal but it worked.

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: Question
by unoengborg on Tue 26th Jul 2005 16:36 UTC
unoengborg
Member since:
2005-07-06

That would be possible. For one thing PHP supports ODBC, so that would give you a wide range of databses to chose from.

There are also native PHP drivers for Postgresql, last time I looked that was true for Firebird as well but unless you use common free databases like MySQL or Postgresql you may have to recompile PHP to make it work.
It whats enabled varies from distro to distro.

Reply Score: 1

RE: DB abstraction
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 16:58 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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Check PHP5 beta3 - includes PDO (php data objects):

A new native database abstraction layer providing performance, ease-of-use, and flexibility.

Reply Score: 0

RE:
by Anonymous on Wed 27th Jul 2005 08:53 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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Some answers from a PHP programmer:

Re: DB abstraction:
You also have the DB class from pear and now you have the new PDO layer ( http://www.php.net/manual/en/ref.pdo.php ).

Re: Installation is horror:
Ok , so you installed PHP5 on FreeBSD - a system that uses Portage to build everything from scratch, but what does this have to do with Zend Core? Zend Core supports only Linux and AIX, AFAIK.

Re: Rob
I don't think that this product is only good for providing an easy-to-install PHP. Looks like this product is aimed also at selling support for the PHP engine. That's a good thing because it will encourage the enterprise users to use PHP.

RE: Why bother with PHP at all?
ASP.net is not an option for me. I just don't trust Windows Servers but that's a different flame war.
Python is a nice language and I love it, and Ruby+rails is even cooler, but I have a feeling that these languages will stay hackers-only languages. I don't see how the simple programmers (who didn't learn design patterns) can do anything useful with those languages.

Reply Score: 0

PHP and other technologies
by Anonymous on Sat 30th Jul 2005 19:12 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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Perhaps you have not notice but this osnews.com
site uses PHP. Now go figure which technology is dying and which technology is catching up...

Reply Score: 0