Linked by Joseph Ferrare on Thu 29th Dec 2005 16:31 UTC
Slackware, Slax I was interested to see how Zenwalk differs from Slackware, and after reading on their web site that version 2.01 is 'the biggest jump in Zenwalk evolution since the beginning of the project', I wanted to see how far Zenwalk has come since it was reviewed here as MiniSlack.
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v Striking Similarity
by Anonymous on Thu 29th Dec 2005 16:43 UTC
RE: Striking Similarity
by Thom_Holwerda on Thu 29th Dec 2005 16:46 UTC in reply to "Striking Similarity"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

The Zenwalk logo bares a striking resemblence to the MySQL logo...

Oh dear! Stop the presses! Call the cops!

;)

Reply Score: 5

v RE[2]: Striking Similarity
by Anonymous on Thu 29th Dec 2005 21:16 UTC in reply to "RE: Striking Similarity"
RE[3]: Striking Similarity
by JonO on Fri 30th Dec 2005 02:25 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Striking Similarity"
JonO Member since:
2005-09-23

Well, unless it's your logo, I'd suggest you stop being so pedantic and focus on the topic. Zenwalk has been around for awhile, if anyone had any concerns, I think it would have been an issue by now. Tool.

I've checked out Zenwalk before...it's a bit too "daring" for what I would employ Slackware for.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Striking Similarity
by kmarius on Thu 29th Dec 2005 17:35 UTC in reply to "Striking Similarity"
kmarius Member since:
2005-06-30
Slightly offtopic.
by adamk on Thu 29th Dec 2005 17:00 UTC
adamk
Member since:
2005-07-08

With all this talk of fluxbox, KDE, gnome, XFCE, etc... Does anyone still use something as simple as fvwm any more? I found it funny that the reviewer referred to fluxbox as simple :-)

Adam

Reply Score: 1

RE: Slightly offtopic.
by joef on Thu 29th Dec 2005 17:18 UTC in reply to "Slightly offtopic."
joef Member since:
2005-12-29

I guess I've been showing Linux to Windows users too much lately. I was aiming for center of mass (as they say in the Army). Most people I show Linux to consider KDE normal, Gnome simple and Fluxbox geeky. A bare OpenBox scares them.

Thanks for commenting.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Slightly offtopic.
by DittoBox on Thu 29th Dec 2005 18:07 UTC in reply to "RE: Slightly offtopic."
DittoBox Member since:
2005-07-08

Why run X at all?

:o)

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Slightly offtopic.
by Anonymous on Thu 29th Dec 2005 18:14 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Slightly offtopic."
Anonymous Member since:
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Concur: the answer is emacs. Please repeat the question.

Reply Score: 0

RE[4]: Slightly offtopic.
by DittoBox on Thu 29th Dec 2005 22:57 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Slightly offtopic."
DittoBox Member since:
2005-07-08

Whoa...that's a whole 'nother can of worms right there my friend.

Reply Score: 1

Good review
by Anonymous on Thu 29th Dec 2005 17:37 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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What's the best Slack distro for someone coming off of Suse who watches DVDs and does a little gaming?

Reply Score: 0

RE: Good review
by joef on Thu 29th Dec 2005 18:26 UTC in reply to "Good review"
joef Member since:
2005-12-29

It's very hard to say. Slackware is a great distro in it's own right, and a good place to start. Vector offers several versions (SOHO, Standard, Download...). Zenwalk is, as I noted in the review, very focused and fast (Vector is also very fast). Plus there are some I haven't tried (Frugalware, etc.).

If you really like your gui tools and a single repository to download from automatically, I'd check out Vector or Zenwalk. If you don't mind being a bit more independent, Slackware is probably the best place to start. Everything works, it's fast and has a lot of options. The package management is very simple, but you can add on Swaret, Slackpkg or Slaptget. Also, I've never had anything fail to install on Slackware. Everything seems to be where the upstream developers intended it to be. Linuxpackages.net is great, too.

I really want to like Suse, just as I really want to like Ubuntu, but both seem slow to me, and Suse seems to put things in odd places.

Anyway, have fun.

Reply Score: 2

New Distro
by Anonymous on Thu 29th Dec 2005 17:56 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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I know how bout callin it Dolphix or Flippernix.Lust kidding. Im not sure I understand the significance of the Dolphin in zenwalk but really who cares...the logo is no reflection on the OS's worth.
-nX

Reply Score: 0

Slack rules!!
by Anonymous on Thu 29th Dec 2005 19:43 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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Praise Slack. send in your 30 bucks, Bob demands it!

Reply Score: 0

many bugs
by Anonymous on Thu 29th Dec 2005 20:18 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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I used zenwalk 2.01 for a month and I get forced to go back to slackware because there are many bugs in zenwalk.
For example:
My dvd writer just don't works on zenwalk. I used netpkg to update the system and after this rox stoped to work. There are other problems I don't remember now.

I think zenwalk is a very interesting project but still in the alpha stage.

Reply Score: 0

Reiser4?
by CloudNine on Thu 29th Dec 2005 20:19 UTC
CloudNine
Member since:
2005-06-30

Interesting. The distro claims stability in the vein of Slackware, but uses Reiser4 - which (not to flame of course, I'm looking foward to Reiser4 being merged) isn't even in the main kernel yet. And I believe Slackware still ships with a 2.4 kernel, yet Zenwalk has a 2.6.11 kernel ;)

Looks really good however. Netpkg sounds really neat.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Reiser4?
by monodeldiablo on Fri 30th Dec 2005 03:55 UTC in reply to "Reiser4?"
monodeldiablo Member since:
2005-07-06

Reiser4 has been around for eons. I really don't know the politics involved, but it appears to be suffering from a lack of support from kernel devs to include it in the stock kernel. I believe a lot of it is historical and has much to do with Hans not complying with coding guidelines. The functionality of the filesystem itself, however, is rock stable from what I've witnessed (no corruptions or slowdown yet).

Reply Score: 1

Anonymous
Member since:
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I too am a distro junkie, and once had an 80 GB hard drive with a bunch of windows and linux distros on it all booted via a System Commander menu. Then the 80 GB hard drive ground to a halt. Unhappy about that, I did start over, better than ever with a total of 320 GB of hard drive space. I did get into the world of livecd linux distros, however. Was charmed by the thought that they run off the CD, and are not really installed. One's personal configuration and persistent home directory can be installed on a hard drive, but can also be stored on a USB memory stick. I recommend the hard drive, and also you need a big swap partition on that also that all of the livecd linux, and installed linux installations can use.
--Rapidweather--
http://www.geocities.com/rapidweather/getting_started.htm l

Reply Score: 0

2.6 kernel and reiserfs4
by joef on Thu 29th Dec 2005 22:29 UTC
joef
Member since:
2005-12-29

You can install a 2.6 kernel with Slackware 10.2 (or current). It's called test26. It's what I installed on my desktop and ran until I got a good compile of 2.6.14.3. Of course, it being a Slackware kernel, it's plain vanilla, and Zenwalk's isn't.

I understand there is (or was) a lot of back and forth about reiserfs4. It apparently has something to do with which fs bits should go in the kernel and which shouldn't (too deep for me).

I'm actually running Zenwalk on my centrino laptop now, and it's working fine for me. Haven't updated anything yet, and I probably won't soon. but it is the first distro outside of Ubuntu that has everything working.

Thanks for reading my article.

joe f.

Reply Score: 1

Zen
by Anonymous on Thu 29th Dec 2005 23:22 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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I like zenwalk. Used reiser4 , Did the slackware thing and hunted down all kind of depencies for things like Mplayer. Use Azurues, MSN,Realsoft3D, Blender etc . If I'm running Linux i like to use the latest and greatest as simply as possible. Which means I'm waiting on Archlinux 7.X Berry linux was very good although some custom work was necessary and didn't get yum working. As I've been mainly debian based except for Arch.

Reply Score: 0

RE: Zen
by zombie process on Fri 30th Dec 2005 13:55 UTC in reply to "Zen"
zombie process Member since:
2005-07-08

You can download noodle right now - the install iso says -pre, but it's solid as a rock and sidesteps the devfs and initrd migrations.

Reply Score: 1

How many Linux distros do we need?
by A30Guy on Thu 29th Dec 2005 23:26 UTC
A30Guy
Member since:
2005-07-06

Two or three years ago there was a lot of talk about Linux forking and losing market penetration as a result. While it may not have forked, the myriad distributions may create a perception that the choice is too hard and that standards vary. Perhaps we need three or four top-class, polished, professional-standard Linux distros, rather than hundreds of "me-too" attempts.

Reply Score: 1

monodeldiablo Member since:
2005-07-06

How many people are gonna keep saying this? Listen, the diversity inherent with a standard base (*nix, or Linux in particular) and modular components is a GOOD THING. It has done nothing to slow the adoption rate of Linux distros and has, in fact, encouraged use in areas such as embedded computing, clusters, supercomputing, desktop and server computing. The same old people have been singing this same tune for years and guess what? Adoption hasn't slowed, it's accellerated. The "Linux community" hasn't fractured into 10,000 pieces. Anybody who thinks such a thing could happen has a painfully tenuous grasp of how FOSS works.

Reply Score: 1

joef Member since:
2005-12-29

I'm with monodeldiablo on this one. I talk up Linux every chance I get, and to the vast majority of Windows users there is only one Linux. No, it's not Red Hat. It's just Linux. First you have to get them over the hump of wanting to try anything different, and most of them will look longingly at the greener grass, but never move one little toe toward it.

It's only the ones who start looking into actually trying it who realize there are actually multiple distros. I've never had one tell me they backed off because there were too many choices. Usually, they have somebody pulling them along (or they seek somebody out, in the classic two-step flow of communication) and that person recommends a distro. The rest do as they do in everything else: choose the popular (and therefore same-seeming) option. So they end up with Suse or Mandrake out of Borders or Barnes and Nobles, or Ubuntu or Mepis off the internet. Either way: score!

Later on, as they get further into the FOSS thing, they might switch around, but the couple people I've gotten to use Linux here (it's a small American community in Germany) have stuck with what I gave them as surely as they had stuck with Windows.

Of course, it could be that I'd hate to lose the opportunity to try out a new distro every time I get my machines running sweetly and get bored. Nah.

See ya,

joe f.

Reply Score: 1

hyperion Member since:
2005-12-30

Hi,

I think that the diversity is in fact, the reason why the Linux market is so strong against proprietary OS vendors :
- It would be possible for Microsoft to fight against 4 Linux distributions, but it's a bit more difficult to compete against the 30 main Linux projects.
- About the number of Linux distributions beeing a problem for inovation : IMHO it's benefic : more project = more ideas, which are shared in the GPL way of life ;) For example : Zenwalk includes the "Discover" hardware detection system from the Debian project.
- One more point in favor of diversity is that , as time goes, only the best projects/ideas are kept by the users: it's a kind of Darwinism mode of evolution, and I believe it's the right way to select the best technologies : let the users decide !

Zenwalk is a "rational" Linux system, helped in this goal by the fact that Slackware Linux is itself very simple and rational. Zenwalk conforms to standards (Unixology!), that's the reason why it's stable, clean and fast. Slackware and Zenwalk are friends projects, like Debian/Ubuntu : Zenwalk started from a solid Slack base and added improvements in many domains : admin tools (see userconfig, networkconfig, netpkg), kernel, filesystems, apps selection, desktop tunning, system tunning (hardware/video detection...). And for those who takes care : artwork ;)

About XFCE : I really believe that it has an advantage over Gnome : it's designed from the start as a Desktop environment (like KDE), when Gnome is a mix of several small projects. I'm not writing about speed , everybody knows that XFCE is fast, and features are now really near to Gnome's ;)

Cheers

JP

Reply Score: 1

Anonymous Member since:
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"I think that the diversity is in fact, the reason why the Linux market is so strong against proprietary OS vendors"
Do you really believe Linux is SO strong on the desktop market against Windows?
I think all these many distributions do not bring anything new. They are variants of another distribution . They fix some problem and bring some new problems. The worst part is that there is no way to know if a particular distribution will work well on your specific computer until you try it.
For commercial software support of Linux on the Desktop, these is a nightmare. A commercial software would have to test its product against all these distributions. Needless to say, that does not happen: complex commercial software generally support a very restricted numbers of distributions and in many case, just one or two.
I think instead of creating another new distribution, it would be more productive to support a single distribution that would work everywhere. Granted, that is not as fun for unpaid developpers!

Reply Score: 1

hyperion Member since:
2005-12-30

""Do you really believe Linux is SO strong on the desktop market against Windows? ""

You are right about this, but that's just why I didn't wrote "Desktop market" , just "market".

Linux desktop apps, and specially office apps are still not mature enough to compete. This has nothing to do with Commercial softwares not ported on Linux. The only commercial office software that matters is MS Office, and I don't think that the fact that it's not ported on Linux is related to diversity of platforms.

Diversity is in technology like in sociology or ecology, a very good thing, as well as not always beeing the simplest thing to deal with ... globalisation is more confortable ;)

Reply Score: 1

one linux world
by Anonymous on Fri 30th Dec 2005 06:28 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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It is very nice to see a new linux distribution everyday. But is it better for consumer and liux lover that every developer from every linux distribution get together and developed only one linux version.?
I have my reasons.
1. Linux has a limited resource in term of developer. If every developer get together, we could make a better linux operating system that we have now. This way will win consumer to use more linux.

2.It is nice to compete with others linux distribution. But is it nicer to jon together and compete with microsoft and apple.

3.Every linux distribution has a advantage and shortadvantage. If get together, we can have all good thing in one place.

I am not a developer or programming. I love linux because it is stable, reliable and flexible.

That's my opinion.
linuxfan

Reply Score: 0

Downloading right now...
by djst on Fri 30th Dec 2005 11:04 UTC
djst
Member since:
2005-08-07

I find it a bit weird that they chose XFCE though. I'm all for distros making the choice for the user and not including every possible flavor of every possible software, but sticking to mainstream (e.g. either Gnome or KDE) is a better way to go. XFCE has some annoying usability issues, such as not making use of Fitt's corners. Clicking in a corner of the screen doesn't do anything in XFCE.

Of course, I need to test the distro anyway. ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE: Downloading right now...
by djst on Fri 30th Dec 2005 11:46 UTC in reply to "Downloading right now..."
djst Member since:
2005-08-07

Wow, that was the most complicated installer I've seen since Gentoo (which, admittedtly, doesn't even have an installer). So many questions that shouldn't even be necessary to ask.

I wasn't too happy that it wanted to use Lilo instead of Grub, which means I wouldn't be able to recover manually if things went wrong, since I don't know how to operate Lilo. And things did went wrong. ;) It detected and added Windows XP, but completely ignored my Ubuntu install at another partition. Way to go, now I have no idea how to boot up Ubuntu without installing it on another partition and let it detect the other installation that way..

Oh, and it correctly guessed I had an Intel integrated graphics card and suggested the Vesa graphics driver. Well, I have no knowledge of which driver is appropriate and chose to trust Zenwalk's choice here. However, now the graphical login doesn't even start, which renders the OS completely useless to me.

I guess I'll have to wait for a newer release.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Downloading right now...
by Anonymous on Fri 30th Dec 2005 12:03 UTC in reply to "RE: Downloading right now..."
Anonymous Member since:
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I have met the intel graphic problem too, the method to solve it is, edit the /etc/X11/xorg.conf, at the section "device", note the driver is i810, but zenwalk script write it into the next line, just backspace it to the "driver" line can fix this problem. I hope this may help you.

Reply Score: 0

RE[3]: Downloading right now...
by djst on Fri 30th Dec 2005 12:59 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Downloading right now..."
djst Member since:
2005-08-07

I tried it but to my surprise, not even nano was installed, which forced me to use vi* which I have no idea how to control. :- Also, during the installation I chose to use a different screen font using 50 lines, but somehow that wasn't used when switching virtual terminal, which made half of the text not visible on screen, making the latest command not visible!

To top that, there's no /etc/init.d/* scripts to turn off GDM or whaveter graphical boot program they're using (I thought /etc/init.d scripts were more or less a Linux standard, having seen it in just about every other distro I've tested), so I had to kill the x client repeatedly in order to get 2 new minutes of editing. I tried the obvious "killall -9 gdm", "... xdm", "... kdm", but none were running.

No, this distro is definitely not for me.

Edited 2005-12-30 13:01

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Downloading right now...
by Anonymous on Fri 30th Dec 2005 14:33 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Downloading right now..."
Anonymous Member since:
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there's no /etc/init.d/* scripts to turn off GDM or whaveter graphical boot program they're using (I thought /etc/init.d scripts were more or less a Linux standard, having seen it in just about every other distro I've tested), so I had to kill the x client repeatedly in order to get 2 new minutes of editing. I tried the obvious "killall -9 gdm", "... xdm", "... kdm", but none were running.

"pstree" is a good tool for viewing the currently active services. Since Zenwalk is based on Slackware, it might be worth reading the Slackware documentation to find out more about Zenwalk's init system.
http://www.slackbook.org/html/system-configuration.html#SYSTEM-CONF...
http://www.slackbook.org/html/security.html#AEN5102

I haven't yet tried Zenwalk but there's another Slackware derivative that I can recommend: Frugalware. Frugalware shares Slackware's ideal of simplicity but it's more desktop-oriented (KDE, GNOME, XFCE ...). Frugalware uses scripts written by Patrick Volkerding and it has better localization support than Slackware. Frugalware uses the pacman package manager from Arch Linux and it has added a GUI frontend to pacman. Frugalware packages are usually very up-to-date and they are i686 optimized.

And, yes, Frugalware has nano. :-)

Reply Score: 0

RE: Downloading right now...
by zombie process on Fri 30th Dec 2005 14:00 UTC in reply to "Downloading right now..."
zombie process Member since:
2005-07-08

Fitt is possibly the most overrated individual in UI design ever. I'm completely sick of hearing his name invoked.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Downloading right now...
by djst on Fri 30th Dec 2005 17:13 UTC in reply to "RE: Downloading right now..."
djst Member since:
2005-08-07

I'd advice you to forget about the individual and just acknowledge the fact that the corners of the screen is the easiest locations to click on.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Downloading right now...
by j-s-h on Sun 1st Jan 2006 16:10 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Downloading right now..."
j-s-h Member since:
2005-07-08

No, the easiest location to click on is where the mouse already is, not some screen corner far away.

XFCE makes good use of Fitts's law because you can right click anywhere on the desktop to get the menu, instead of having to move it all the way to the corner.

Reply Score: 1

zenwalk is great!
by Anonymous on Fri 30th Dec 2005 11:39 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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I use zenwalk1.3 in my power plant historian product, as the OS.
It is very fast and stable. The best thing for developers, every tool and library like gcc and GTK+ is ready. if I use Ubuntu, I have to grab them one by one.
Please take a look at zenwalk and my gas turbine historian at
http://www.leiosoft.com/products.htm

Reply Score: 0

RE[3]: How many Linux distros do we need?
by Anonymous on Fri 30th Dec 2005 14:57 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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I think all this discussion on "too many Linux distros" is quite pointless. As long as people are allowed to create their distributions, they will keep creating them and nothing can be done to stop them. Well, actually it might be possible to stop them - for example, by making it illegal to create a new distro - but this will almost certainly kill Linux.

Reply Score: 0

nice !
by Anonymous on Fri 30th Dec 2005 15:56 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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Just downloaded and installed - total time 3 hours, typing Zenwalk !

As a slack user (when I get the chance), I found it a pleasure to install - the only small flaw was forgetting to disable cardbus, which for some reason locks up the system on my acer travelmate 4101LMi

Aside from that, flawless installation and everything so far works - just need to check to see if I can configure the wireless card and I'm good to go.

Thanks for the heads up.

Not sure about XFCE tho, will give it a try for a while, but I prefer KDE.

Reply Score: 0

Disapointing Review
by AxXium on Fri 30th Dec 2005 17:56 UTC
AxXium
Member since:
2005-12-30

I am really disappointed in this review. From reading it the reader is left with the feeling that Zenwalk walk is nothing more than a "Wanna-be Vector Linux with a more brightly colored Slackware installer". There are many positive notes there but there are as many or more negative ones. The articles comments compare to slapping someone in the face, saying youíre sorry and then following it up with yet another slap.

Zenwalk is an amazing distro. Much hard work, thought and effort is put into it. That hard work and thought is clearly visible to anyone that takes the time to open there eyes.

In his own words the author stated that he wanted to see how it compares to Slackware. Zenwalk while in fact was originally based on Slackware is not and will never be Slackware. It is much improved on. Numerous tools have been added to make using the system more enjoyable without sacrificing control. To list all of the improvements, tools and usable features this distro combines into a distro would make this comment a small non-fiction book.

It may not be for everyone but to each his own. Personally, I much prefer Zenwalk than anything else. So much so that it has replaced every distro on all seven of my machines.

Bottom line... Zenwalk is more than a Slackware clone or a Vector wannabe. It is a worthy and noble distro in its own right.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Disapointing Review
by djst on Fri 30th Dec 2005 22:22 UTC in reply to "Disapointing Review"
djst Member since:
2005-08-07

"To list all of the improvements, tools and usable features this distro combines into a distro would make this comment a small non-fiction book."

Go ahead and list at least 20 of them. I won't mind.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Disapointing Review
by Anonymous on Fri 30th Dec 2005 22:49 UTC in reply to "RE: Disapointing Review"
Anonymous Member since:
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Yep, I tried it out and you could say that it is an improvement. That is if "doesn't work" is an improvement.
It took three trys to get it to boot after the install.
Back with Slack now. Life is good.

Reply Score: 0

RE: Disapointing Review
by joef on Sun 1st Jan 2006 01:06 UTC in reply to "Disapointing Review"
joef Member since:
2005-12-29

Sorry to hear you're disappointed, but I laid it out as I saw it. I made it pretty clear where I was coming from, as well as how things went. I summed it up by saying the distro was tight, which, for my generation, was high praise.

Since I wrote the review I replaced my Ubuntu installation on my centrino-based laptop with Zenwalk. It's much nicer, actually, because it is so tight and tightly focused. With speedstep on I'm running at 600 Mhz most of the time, and I can really feel the difference. Of course, it took more work.

I think the comments show it's a mixed bag, which is waht you can say about pretty much every distro.

Thanks for the feedback.

Reply Score: 1

Hey guy's It's nice
by Anonymous on Fri 30th Dec 2005 23:07 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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I'm glad I saw this article. I'm giving this Zenwalk a spin right now. I'm impressed. I'm known as the Slackware guy in my circles. I think they've got something here. This is a great litle distro. I may hang on to it a while.


Quoted from Anonymous:
"It took three trys to get it to boot after the install. Back with Slack now. Life is good"

Hey guy, if you can't install Zenwalk, in less than four tries, you probably can't install butter on bread and have no business fooling around with a computer no less.

My 2 cents

Reply Score: 0

RE: Hey guy's It's nice
by Anonymous on Fri 30th Dec 2005 23:26 UTC in reply to "Hey guy's It's nice"
Anonymous Member since:
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I have reinstalled SLackware on my computer added Kernel-2.6.13.1 and patched it to use Win4Lin compiled a new Kernel installed Win4lin and win98se.
All without a hitch.
Although I have never 'installed' butter on bread I do believe I can fool around with computers.
It could have been a bad read of a file from the cdrom or it could have been a compatabiility problem. Don't know. Don't care.
I was not impressed with Zenwalk even after the install went through.
If you are not pleased with Slack then you are probably not doing it right or need a few new circles. :>)

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: Hey guy's It's nice
by Anonymous on Fri 30th Dec 2005 23:54 UTC in reply to "RE: Hey guy's It's nice"
Anonymous Member since:
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hehe

This posts hilarious!!! ;)

Hey I'm knocking Slackware in anyway, Da Man is still Da Man.

The butter things was meant as a joke btw. ;)

Smile ;)

I just mean Zenwalk looks really promising. It has a Slackware based package management system with optional automatic dependency checking and installation.

Did you notice that, yes, I said dependency checking and resolution. All from one repository, not from linuxpackages.net stuff built from God only knows what clown.

I love Slackware and always will. The guy who created Zenwalk does too. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery after all.

I kinda agree with AxXium.

I too am opposed to someone installing an OS for two days or two minutes and thinking that they know everything about it.


Does that make them qualified to publish a review on it? I don't think so.

Reply Score: 0

Slackware is the best
by Anonymo on Sat 31st Dec 2005 06:14 UTC
Anonymo
Member since:
2005-07-06

maybe slackware should aquire netpkg. it seems to do a really good job. I installed this and I would describe it as installing slackware + optional tweaks I usually do. What it reminds me of is archlinux. This is trully slackware + pacman, but its called netpkg. It has less options, like no removing [that i know of], but you got pkgtool, which is really good.

I usually install the 2.6.13 kernel [test26] and from there I install the modules and such.

Zenwalk does all the steps for you that are usually done [by me] + one more. I wish Slackware would only install the programs you need then add x11 and fluxbox afterwards.

I am excited for this as well:

Quote:
But I plan to release another branch more optimized for servers : Zenwalk Lamp :
- smaller
- with non-preemptive kernel
- with essential LAMP features (Apache, Mysql, PHP)

Can't wait, guys there are doing a GREAT!!! Job.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Slackware is the best
by hyperion on Sat 31st Dec 2005 09:24 UTC in reply to "Slackware is the best"
hyperion Member since:
2005-12-30

"This is trully slackware + pacman, but its called netpkg. It has less options, like no removing [that i know of], but you got pkgtool"

NETpkg = Network Package Manager != Pacman
Netpkg also has more options in its field, do "man netpkg"

"Zenwalk does all the steps for you that are usually done [by me] + one more."

You shouldn't compare 1 year of development/improvements done by several people, with post-installation tunnings. This is not fair for Zenwalk developpers ;) Zenwalk is now as far from Slackware as Ubuntu is from Debian.

JP

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Slackware is the best
by Anonymo on Sat 31st Dec 2005 17:17 UTC in reply to "RE: Slackware is the best"
Anonymo Member since:
2005-07-06

well I didn't really mean this to discredit the developers. It's just that Zenwalk is at the stage where I wish Slackware was on the desktop. Zenwalk meets my needs perfectly. It does what I do on slackware afterward/before and even things I wish I could do.

Also, netpkg reminds me of pacman. And I did read man netpkg and know there are more options than "netpkg foo"

I like the way netpkg is simple and meets all dependancies.

Reply Score: 1

RE:Slackware is the best
by Anonymous on Sat 31st Dec 2005 12:48 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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I have tried a LOT of linux distros...maybe a dozen
over the last 3 years....These days I only
have a PII 333Mhz computer as a desktop so I am
interested in the fastest desktop linux can give me
I was down to Vector and Slackware..with vector beating out slack 10.1

After trying Slackware 10.2 I have chosen to ditch my Vector partion and unless there is a REAL good reason
I won't be trying any more linux distros except for fun.
Here' why
(0) Slackware 10.2 is as fast as Vector(the dynamite version for speed was installed) and is noticably faster than 10.1 . Even Gnome(installed via Freerock gnome) is quick and resposive!

(1) Vector and all "simplified" distros always leave
something out and I don't mean just on the server side . For vector it was the lack of CJK display
(Chinese Japanese Korean fonts) that is in 10.2 by default. It is NOT trivial to download and properly install fonts in linux.
(2) Once you have learned the basics of unix (yes this includes the vi editor) any linux install is not that hard . I think partioning may be the most difficult concept for the newbie.
(3) Package management is all fine and well and
if slackware had NetBSD install that would be great.
But..I can live without it. Believe it or not
klik(a debian installer) will work on slackware
as long as you have a loopback enabled kernel.
(4) I like to play with my OS ..while I haven't done
much server work I hope to learn..
So for educational purposes it's best to work with
a full system.

(5) for really old hardware like a 486 there are at least 2 distros: puppy and peanut that are designed for this and have some cool ideas..nonstandard apps..

In conclusion I am not saying its bad BUT what we need to see are some DETAILED benchmarks of Zenwalk vs Slackware(10.2) and maybe puppy thrown in..
Maybe the article just isn;t convincing enough..

Reply Score: 0