Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 31st Dec 2005 16:55 UTC
Mozilla & Gecko clones "SeaMonkey is the successor of the Mozilla Suite, described as 'a community effort to deliver production-quality releases of code derived from the application formerly known as Mozilla Application Suite'. And it's finally got a brand new logo, one that supposedly represents a SeaMonkey but actually ended up looking like a blue bird, at least to my untrained eye." In addition, Camino 1.0b2 has been released.
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Seamonkey linux beta
by jsonder on Sat 31st Dec 2005 17:27 UTC
jsonder
Member since:
2005-12-31

I'd been using the alpha and the beta installed fine except for a talkback file.

In fact, I'm using it to reply to this....

Reply Score: 1

RE: Seamonkey linux beta
by rslewine on Sat 31st Dec 2005 20:15 UTC in reply to "Seamonkey linux beta"
rslewine Member since:
2005-12-24

I have it running in Xandros, also without the Talkback. Been using it without incident since it became available.

And composer is a very good "in between" for tweaking web pages.

Reply Score: 1

Simple question...
by truckweb on Sat 31st Dec 2005 17:41 UTC
truckweb
Member since:
2005-07-06

Why SeaMonkey when you can use FireFox and Thunderbird?

What's so good about SeaMonkey?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Simple question...
by miscz on Sat 31st Dec 2005 17:47 UTC in reply to "Simple question..."
miscz Member since:
2005-07-17

It's what Firefox doesn't want to be - entire suite with mail app, site composer, chat, etc. Some people like that, some people don't - it's all about freedom to choose ;)

Reply Score: 5

RE: Simple question...
by CPUGuy on Sat 31st Dec 2005 17:47 UTC in reply to "Simple question..."
CPUGuy Member since:
2005-07-06

What's so good about Firefox?

Reply Score: 5

RE: Simple question...
by jessta on Sat 31st Dec 2005 18:13 UTC in reply to "Simple question..."
jessta Member since:
2005-08-17

Well, If you're going to run both thunderbird and firefox then it's probably better to run the SeaMonkey suite seeing as that would mean that you would only need to run one instance of the gecko engine.

Hopefully this issue will be resolved when XULRunner gets finished.

Also the integration between the application is much better in seamonkey.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Simple question...
by urbanRealist on Sat 31st Dec 2005 18:41 UTC in reply to "Simple question..."
urbanRealist Member since:
2005-12-31

I have both Firefox and the Mozilla Suite installed. Part of this is that I like the mozilla mail client better than Thunderbird. The other reason is the Mozilla Composer. I don't know of a simpler way to write/update HTML pages. I know most people would use either a text editor or something like Dreamweaver, but the composer is a nice in-between that I've never found an equivalent to.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Simple question...
by gonzalo on Sat 31st Dec 2005 19:38 UTC in reply to "RE: Simple question..."
gonzalo Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm not endorsing this in any way or saying Firefox + Nvu is better than Seamonkey + Composer, but if you want, you can use Nvu ( http://www.nvu.com/ ) which is more or less a "standalone version of Composer".

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Simple question...
by urbanRealist on Sat 31st Dec 2005 21:18 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Simple question..."
urbanRealist Member since:
2005-12-31

Thanks. 'emerge nvu' took a while, but I think Nvu is an improvement over Mozilla Composer. While there is something to be said for the intergration of the Mozilla Browser with the Composer, I think the syntax highlighting on source section of Nvu and the CSS Editor makes up for this.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Simple question...
by rm6990 on Sat 31st Dec 2005 21:05 UTC in reply to "RE: Simple question..."
rm6990 Member since:
2005-07-04

Nvu is based on Mozilla Composer, with a hell of a lot more options and a nice integrated site manager.

Mozilla Suite essentially became Firefox, Thunderbird and Nvu.

Nvu can be downloaded from www.nvu.com.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Simple question...
by Roguelazer on Sat 31st Dec 2005 23:49 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Simple question..."
Roguelazer Member since:
2005-06-29

Don't forget Sunbird (Mozilla Calendar).

Reply Score: 1

RE: Simple question...
by Rafal_Glazar on Sun 1st Jan 2006 03:08 UTC in reply to "Simple question..."
Rafal_Glazar Member since:
2006-01-01

This is one of those questions that I usualy reply "Why use Linux when there is Windows?" To me the answer is simple. Because it's there and it suits my needs better. For you Firefox and Thunderbird might be better. It's called diversity and freedom of choice.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Simple question...
by vikramsharma on Sun 1st Jan 2006 16:52 UTC in reply to "Simple question..."
vikramsharma Member since:
2005-07-06

I am not sure but isn't FireFox based on the original Mozilla 1.8. I could be a little off topic here. FireFox to me is a standalone browser version of SeaMonkey.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Simple question...
by edwdig on Mon 2nd Jan 2006 04:50 UTC in reply to "RE: Simple question..."
edwdig Member since:
2005-08-22

I am not sure but isn't FireFox based on the original Mozilla 1.8. I could be a little off topic here. FireFox to me is a standalone browser version of SeaMonkey.

The core engine of FireFox is the same as Mozilla, but a lot of features have been removed, and most of the Preferences options have been removed. FireFox forces you to mess around in about:config to change a lot of options, when the suite has a nice interface to do it.

About the only thing FireFox does better than the suite is it has a nicer theme. Contrary to popular belief, FireFox eats more memory and is slower than the suite. It also requires you to add a bunch of extensions and mess with the config options by hand to get what you already get in the suite.

In the end, the suite is practical but FireFox is trendy, hence FireFox gets all the attention.

Reply Score: 3

Why not?
by jsonder on Sat 31st Dec 2005 17:50 UTC
jsonder
Member since:
2005-12-31

Call it Netscape with improved fonts. For folks who like to dink with things (or are so old that Netscape was their first useable browser).

And I use both Firefox and Thunderbird. Seamonkey is used as a separate browser w/out the ad and javascript blockage for certain sites.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Why not?
by joekiser on Sat 31st Dec 2005 21:19 UTC in reply to "Why not?"
joekiser Member since:
2005-06-30

Call it Netscape with improved fonts. For folks who like to dink with things (or are so old that Netscape was their first useable browser).

I use SeaMonkey because I fell for the Mozilla Suite many years ago, and set up a comfortable browsing environment that I can't duplicate anywhere else. Being able to receive new mail notifications without having to keep the mail window open, for example. The Multizilla extension, available only for the Suite, gives me the ability to customize tabbed browsing far beyond what Firefox + Tabbed Browser Extensions do. I don't really understand why people get so excited over the hundreds of extensions available for Firefox. Many of these extensions only add features that are already present in the suite. Give me the suite with Multizilla + Adblock + Mnenhy any day over whatever environment you can set up in Firefox.

By the way, I resent the "old" statement. I'm only 21, but I know what works for me. It's all about freedom of choice. For everyone that asks why use Seamonkey when there is Firefox, remember that three years ago people were asking, "Why use Phoenix (precursor to Firefox) when we have K-Meleon?"

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Why not?
by CPUGuy on Sat 31st Dec 2005 22:02 UTC in reply to "RE: Why not?"
CPUGuy Member since:
2005-07-06

I too resent the old statement. I'm only 22 and actually, my first usuable browser was NetCom's Netcruiser, which I later replaced with Netscape (2, I believe). So my first usable browser pre-dates Netscape.

Reply Score: 1

Unbeliever
Member since:
2005-07-09

..Camino seems to be getting closer and closer to stable status. That's good, because it is a very good browser.

Reply Score: 1

MechaShiva Member since:
2005-07-06

Since I got my mac, I have been searching for that perfect browsing experience and Camino is damn close. At first, I was a little bent out of shape over the lack of the adblock extension. But because it is based on the gecko engine, a properly placed userContent.css* file can do as good a job as adblock with lower maintanence (no updating plugins when updating browser, etc).

Camino really is a fantastic browser that I miss when working on my windows box at work. Here's to hoping they keep up the great work.

*
http://www.mozilla.org/support/firefox/adblock.html
*

Reply Score: 1

Who is That Member since:
2005-07-02

Camino needs to hook into OS X's spell check engine.....

It is a pain in the arse to suck at spelling and not see what words I may have miss spelled in my fingers of furry.

Reply Score: 2

Mozilla Composer
by Joe User on Sat 31st Dec 2005 20:18 UTC
Joe User
Member since:
2005-06-29

It's very old and hasn't been updated for years. It still uses HTML 4.01, ISO-8859-1, it doesn't support CSS, it doesn't have code highlighting... Reminds me FrontPage back in the 90's.

Reply Score: 1

Making seamonkey look like Firefox
by buff on Sat 31st Dec 2005 20:20 UTC
buff
Member since:
2005-11-12

I got a little bored during the holiday season and decided to see how hard it would be to make seamonkey look like Firefox. I posted a screenshot and the theme files here: http://markbokil.org/downloads/seamonkey/install.html

-mark

Reply Score: 2

Charles A Landemaine Member since:
2005-11-11

Interesting enough ;)
I have also done it: http://www.auriance.com/docs/screenshots/seamonkey.png

I think the Firefox look & feel it a lot more professional ;)

Reply Score: 2

buff Member since:
2005-11-12

hey, that is funny you did it too. I am working at replacing the seamonkey mail icons with thunderbird ones also.

Reply Score: 1

Charles A Landemaine Member since:
2005-11-11

Yes, actually when I saw the direction the Seamonkey project was taking, I found out that the goals of the project weren't exactly what I expected, and also I got a little sad of the fact that the Seamonkey devs didn't take much community feedback into account.

I bought the domain name opensuite.org, and maybe one day I'd like to release a fork of Seamonkey with default presets that make more sense, with the Firefox theme too, and a different name and logo. I'd like some extensions installed by default such as session saver and mouse gestures. But I need more people to get started...

Reply Score: 2

mea culpa
by jsonder on Sun 1st Jan 2006 01:47 UTC
jsonder
Member since:
2005-12-31

I guess that you've figured out that web browsers (and the world wide web) aren't all that old, and you don't have to be old, either.

Anyone want to discuss programming using FORTRAN II ?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Why not?
by Anonymous on Sun 1st Jan 2006 02:22 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
---

"Why use Phoenix (precursor to Firefox) when we have K-Meleon?"

Can you tell me why? Firefox has come a long way since Phoenix, but it's still dog-slow and a memory hog compared to K-Meleon, just as it was then.

Browser: ELinks/0.11rc0 (textmode; Darwin 8.3.0 Power Macintosh; 80x40-3)

Reply Score: 1