Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 28th Jan 2006 16:46 UTC, submitted by Dually
Intel "Connect any USB 2.0 device to your notebook and lose more than one hour of battery time: Tom's Hardware Guide's tests of a Windows-based Intel Core Duo mobile processor platform revealed a serious power consumption issue that, according to Intel, is caused by a Microsoft driver bug - a bug that has been known by Microsoft for some time, but kept from the public eye until today."
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v woot
by gplCop318 on Sat 28th Jan 2006 18:25 UTC
RE: woot
by lagitus on Sat 28th Jan 2006 18:34 UTC in reply to "woot"
lagitus Member since:
2005-07-18

honestly why do people keep trolling?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: woot
by bornagainenguin on Sun 29th Jan 2006 11:51 UTC in reply to "RE: woot"
bornagainenguin Member since:
2005-08-07

I agree he was trolling-- you could tell by the tone-- but he does have the fragment of a point. If Microsoft has known about this issue and its their issue, why haven't they released a fix before now?

--bornagainpenguin

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: woot
by Sphinx on Sun 29th Jan 2006 19:47 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: woot"
Sphinx Member since:
2005-07-09

Exactly, how much warning and heads up do they need?

Reply Score: 1

Ho hum.
by Phillip.Fayers on Sat 28th Jan 2006 19:45 UTC
Phillip.Fayers
Member since:
2005-12-14

So, no mention in the story headline of the fact that the new dual core chip still lasts longer on the battery than the old one?

The new dual core chips have more power saving options, its not really suprising in an early release that the O/S won't fully understand them all. One way to save power is to shut down one core completely. I'm guessing the bug prevents that for some reason and it'll probably take some reworking under the hood of the O/S to fix it, which is why it's still around even after being reported such a long time ago.

--
Phillip Fayers http://phillipfayers.blogspot.com/

Reply Score: 1

elsewhere
Member since:
2005-07-13

After 5 pages of article, what I really got out of it is that Intel's chipset isn't working correctly with Microsoft's ACPI driver.

Intel developed ACPI. Microsoft refused to use Intel's implementation of ACPI and creatively re-engineered their own version and forced hardware vendors to use that to ensure compatibility. Now Intel's power management isn't working with Windows.

And people wonder why linux has trouble with ACPI support with supposedly ACPI-compliant hardware?

Anyways, just found it ironic that it appears to be biting back at Intel. I could be incorrect in my interpretation, but one would expect Intel to pretty much understand designing their hardware for ACPI compliance.

Reply Score: 5

n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

Intel developed ACPI. Microsoft refused to use Intel's implementation of ACPI and creatively re-engineered their own version and forced hardware vendors to use that to ensure compatibility. Now Intel's power management isn't working with Windows.

ACPI was co-developed by Hewlett-Packard, Intel, Microsoft, Phoenix, and Toshiba.

Reply Score: 2

Ouch!
by Tyr. on Sat 28th Jan 2006 21:01 UTC
Tyr.
Member since:
2005-07-06

They better fix this one quickly. From the article :

"Since Microsoft's drivers are now believed to be directly involved, then all of Apple's upcoming MacBook Pro systems - which use the Core Duo processor and 945 chipset - should be unaffected by this issue. We have yet to attain access to a MacBook Pro to verify this."

Imagine if magazines and websites start benchmarking the PC Core Duo laptops vs the Mac ones : "the hardware is pretty much the same but we found the mac has an extra hour of battery time. Thanks Microsoft."

Seems like mactel already has the advantage over wintel, who would have imagined.

Reply Score: 5

Finally
by seeder on Sun 29th Jan 2006 09:48 UTC
seeder
Member since:
2006-01-29

So, now we can say that linux is more power efficient that windows, and we have a proof.

Intel recommends Linux for his new Intel Core platform ;)

Reply Score: 4