Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 20th Mar 2006 16:37 UTC, submitted by anonymous
General Development "Become more productive with your own code and others by utilizing Eclipse's syntax highlighting, code completion, and other amenities. It runs on any UNIX platform with a JRE (1.4 or newer) and an SWT port, such as Linux, Solaris, AIX, and HP-UX. It's easy enough to start a new project using Eclipse or to import an existing Eclipse project, but how do you bring existing code into the IDE? And what if you need to get an existing project compiling right away without modifying its existing makefile or configure script? Read along for the answer to all of these questions."
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Eclipse
by ma_d on Mon 20th Mar 2006 22:10 UTC
ma_d
Member since:
2005-06-29

I've used Eclipse.
I've used VS 6.
I've used emacs+gdb+make.

I'll stick with the components that work seperately. I despise IDE's these days.

In C I crashed Eclipse about every hour. In Java it was about every 3-6 hours. And the format function doesn't work on the C plugin for eclipse, or it didn't 3 months ago.

Honestly, do they really think they'll turn more than two or three people away to IDE's these days? Those of us who avoid IDE's do it for a reason. And usually it's that we've been burned on IDE's in the past and ended up finding the niceties of multiple tools glued together with some shell and some creativity.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Eclipse
by kaiwai on Tue 21st Mar 2006 03:34 UTC in reply to "Eclipse"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Honestly, do they really think they'll turn more than two or three people away to IDE's these days? Those of us who avoid IDE's do it for a reason. And usually it's that we've been burned on IDE's in the past and ended up finding the niceties of multiple tools glued together with some shell and some creativity.

I think that unless you really need to click and assign code to widgets, you're better off just using a text editor with an understanding of code; be is vi, emacs or something else.

I've used VS.NET IDE, and I like it, but at the same time, one has to be prepared for hefty system requirements - unless you're going to use most of the features offered by IDE's, you're probably better off sticking to the old fashioned methods.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Eclipse
by ma_d on Tue 21st Mar 2006 05:45 UTC in reply to "RE: Eclipse"
ma_d Member since:
2005-06-29

VS, from my experience, is pretty light. Eclipse is a true beast. I _can't_ run it on my laptop (700 Celeron), it takes 10 minutes to get up to coding and from there it can't keep up with my typing.
I can run a memory debugger on smaller applications on that machine, but I can't run Eclipse...


Anyway, I find myself rather limited in an IDE. My familiar CLI tools like sed, grep, and find aren't there for me.
Although, VS is really an all start of the IDE world. Their auto-complete is really stellar, and I've heard it generates quite a lot of code for you. Usefully, at that.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Eclipse
by werpu on Tue 21st Mar 2006 10:16 UTC in reply to "Eclipse"
werpu Member since:
2006-01-18

Actually the experience is not normal, Eclipse in itself (cannot speak for the CDT though) is pretty fast and usually is very crashprone. I have around 50 plugins in there, and it still does not crash on me, I have to restart it once per week, during 8 hour coding sessions every day.

But I use it for java and latex, and javascript and j2ee coding I do not use the CDT, and I give it more than the standard 64MB ram.

Reply Score: 1

Eclipse needs ram
by werpu on Tue 21st Mar 2006 10:14 UTC
werpu
Member since:
2006-01-18

Unless you have a g4 based mac Eclipse is pretty fast, the main problem is it needs ram, lots of ram, and java unlike other windows Applications only gives a certain amount of ram (which is 64MB default). Eclipse starts within a 64MB frame but the experience for raw coding is not a pleaser, give it 150-200mb (-vmargs -Xmx200m at the startup line) and you will get a very good performance.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Eclipse needs ram
by chrish on Tue 21st Mar 2006 14:33 UTC in reply to "Eclipse needs ram"
chrish Member since:
2005-07-14

I run it on my iBook (G4, 1GHz) and it's fine; generally seems about as responsive as on my Windows desktop at work (P4 2.8GHz, but a generally craptastick box).

The worst machine I run it on is a 450MHz P3 running QNX 6 with only 256MB of RAM. It works, but it's a bit slow.

- chrish

Reply Score: 1

ide
by viton on Tue 21st Mar 2006 10:37 UTC
viton
Member since:
2005-08-09

Code is not a text, it just looks like a text.

IDE is a cool, but there is still no comfortable IDE for me. I would like to have a fullscreen ide with 2 modes - project and class edit. In project mode i need refactoring and other tools operating on program tree and in text mode all CODE-editing tools like
formatting/completion/class viewing/documenting/tests etc.
I should'nt not have any annoying windows like FindText and popups like "Press OK". Probably it should look like VI.
All functions and windows should be accessible by 1 key combination.
So far IDEs are bloated and require a lot of mouse dragging.
Actually i like the lcc-win32. It is small, fast but it is "C" and doesn't have most of the features i want.

Reply Score: 1

RE: ide
by Beryllium on Tue 21st Mar 2006 15:01 UTC in reply to "ide"
Beryllium Member since:
2005-07-08

Eclipse has a vi module.

Reply Score: 1