Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 26th Mar 2006 16:26 UTC, submitted by Falko Timme
Internet & Networking "In this tutorial I will describe how to set up a highly available NFS server that can be used as storage solution for other high-availability services like, for example, a cluster of web servers that are being loadbalanced. If you have a web server cluster with two or more nodes that serve the same web site(s), than these nodes must access the same pool of data so that every node serves the same data, no matter if the loadbalancer directs the user to node 1 or node n. This can be achieved with an NFS share on an NFS server that all web server nodes (the NFS clients) can access."
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Useful, but incomplete
by Platypus on Sun 26th Mar 2006 17:40 UTC
Platypus
Member since:
2006-03-26

There are a few more subtleties to implementing a highly available NFS cluster than the article mentions. For example, there are problems with non-idempotent operations such as rename interacting with XID caches (which are not replicated on disk). Failing even to mention the existence of such issues can lead to users who follow the offered advice experiencing serious problems, and IMO is thus a bit irresponsible.

Reply Score: 1

Little note about OSX
by Jack Malmostoso on Sun 26th Mar 2006 18:13 UTC
Jack Malmostoso
Member since:
2006-01-20

If you want to access to an NFS server from an OSX machine, you have to export a folder with the "insecure" option.
It is not very nice, but otherwise you'll not be able to access it, linux will reject the connection.

Btw, from OSX, Option+K in Finder and then nfs://myserver/my/share.

Reply Score: 1

NAS
by SEJeff on Sun 26th Mar 2006 18:41 UTC
SEJeff
Member since:
2005-11-05

For a complete no-brainer NAS (network attached storage) install, take a look at OpenFiler http://www.openfiler.com/

This is a really nice distro I use for a home media server and is based off of CentOS. Very easy to configure and manage even if you aren't much of a Linux buff.

Reply Score: 2

Great article
by AndrewZ on Sun 26th Mar 2006 20:02 UTC
AndrewZ
Member since:
2005-11-15

It's nice to see a mostly-complete article on high availability NFS. An alternative method would be to use Solaris 11, and use the ZFS file system to great highly redundant disk pools (aka software RAID's).

This would add another layer of failure proofing.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Great article
by Platypus on Mon 27th Mar 2006 02:05 UTC in reply to "Great article"
Platypus Member since:
2006-03-26

For all of its strengths, ZFS is still just a local filesystem and thus is not a direct alternative to any network or cluster filesystem. Since it also runs on a different OS than the technologies mentioned in this article and might not be compatible with them even if ported, it's pretty much totally irrelevant.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Great article
by Soulbender on Mon 27th Mar 2006 04:48 UTC in reply to "Great article"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

"An alternative method would be to use Solaris 11, and use the ZFS file system to great highly redundant disk pools (aka software RAID's)."

Uhmm, no. ZFS is not a network filesystem.

Reply Score: 1