Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 13th Apr 2006 17:52 UTC
FreeBSD FreeBSD 6.1-RC1 has been released. "The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 6.1-RC1. It is meant to be a refinement of the 6-STABLE, branch with few dramatic changes. A lot of bugfixes have been made, some drivers have been updated, and some areas have been tweaked for better performance, etc., but no large changes have been made to the basic architecture."
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This is inspiring
by evilmegaman on Thu 13th Apr 2006 19:02 UTC
evilmegaman
Member since:
2005-09-20

I have been inspired to install freebsd again. I will install the current stable (6.0), I just need to have good luck this time. I can never seem to get freebsd to work properly. But I have faith this time. sounds like a nice project.

And on the subject of 6.1, What are the dramatic changes?

Reply Score: 1

RE: This is inspiring
by fak3r on Thu 13th Apr 2006 19:09 UTC in reply to "This is inspiring"
fak3r Member since:
2006-04-12

I just need to have good luck this time. I can never seem to get freebsd to work properly.
How so? If you have had issues before, I recommend following the handbook on your next install; it some of the best open source documentation I've ever seen:
http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/

And on the subject of 6.1, What are the dramatic changes?
Certainly not as much from 5.5 -> 6.0, but still worthwhile. Full list here, scroll to the bottom for ones in 'testing' that have been addressed:
http://www.freebsd.org/releases/6.1R/todo.html

Reply Score: 2

RE: This is inspiring
by Carnevill on Thu 13th Apr 2006 19:11 UTC in reply to "This is inspiring"
Carnevill Member since:
2006-01-18

I think the most dramatic change is the keyboard multiplexer. Beyond that most of the changes are just bug fixes and driver updates.

Reply Score: 2

RE: This is inspiring
by Bado on Thu 13th Apr 2006 19:12 UTC in reply to "This is inspiring"
Bado Member since:
2005-07-06

I've been running 6.1 for a few weeks (since pre-release). It's been running fantastic.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: This is inspiring
by bretthoerner on Thu 13th Apr 2006 19:24 UTC in reply to "RE: This is inspiring"
bretthoerner Member since:
2005-06-29

Question from someone who hasn't done any FreeBSD major updates...

If I install FreeBSD 6.1-rc1 today, can I seemlessly upgrade to 6.1-stable when it is released? I would imagine so, but I just wanted to make sure... some Linux distros don't support anything but a fresh install of stable releases.

(This will be on a home 'server' so there isn't really anything mission critical about it - just laziness)

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: This is inspiring
by Carnevill on Thu 13th Apr 2006 19:46 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: This is inspiring"
Carnevill Member since:
2006-01-18

Yeah you can seemlessly update to 6.1 stable. All you have to do is download the sources and rebuild the world http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/makeworld....

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: This is inspiring
by lopisaur on Thu 13th Apr 2006 20:04 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: This is inspiring"
lopisaur Member since:
2006-02-27

If you do a cvsup with the RELENG_6 tag and follow the procedure in the handbook, you'll be running 6-Stable, which in turn will show you as running 6.1-RC1

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: This is inspiring
by Bado on Thu 13th Apr 2006 20:49 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: This is inspiring"
Bado Member since:
2005-07-06

Very easily. When you set up the cvsupfile, set:

*default tag=RELENG_6_1

Then when final is released, go thrugh the regular cvsup/make buildwolrd/etc process, and you'll be running 6.1 Final. You can upgrade from 6.0 this way too.

I'm sure 5.x to 6.1 would work, but there could be some cruft or changes that may make it partially unplesent.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: This is inspiring
by cajunman4life on Fri 14th Apr 2006 05:01 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: This is inspiring"
cajunman4life Member since:
2005-08-11

As an aside, I went from 5.4 to 6.0 via source, with no issues.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: This is inspiring
by Nightweaver on Thu 13th Apr 2006 19:32 UTC in reply to "RE: This is inspiring"
Nightweaver Member since:
2006-02-06

Yep. I've been running 6.1 BETA for quite some time now and it's working fantastic.:)

Reply Score: 1

RE: This is inspiring
by celt on Thu 13th Apr 2006 19:30 UTC in reply to "This is inspiring"
celt Member since:
2005-07-06

There are no dramatic changes...did you read the link or the RC1 anouncement.

Reply Score: 1

I wonder
by siride on Thu 13th Apr 2006 19:23 UTC
siride
Member since:
2006-01-02

Is there any possibility they will ever make it so you can install FreeBSD on a non-primary partition? I don't have the luxury right now of having a spare primary partition and therefore I cannot use FreeBSD.

Reply Score: 1

RE: I wonder
by TaterSalad on Thu 13th Apr 2006 19:37 UTC in reply to " I wonder"
TaterSalad Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm not sure about FreeBSD, but I know OpenBSD wants to be the OS on the primary partition. I had it install to a third harddrive, then booted into Windows and installed a bootloader called xosl. After configuring xosl, I was able to boot between Windows and OpenBSD.

As for FreeBSD, I'd say give it a try and see if it lets you install to the other partition. If you can't boot into it you can try to install a bootloader, if that doesn't work then no loss since you weren't able to use FreeBSD before anyway. You can also get a vmware image of it if you wanted to try it without installing.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: I wonder
by vlado on Thu 13th Apr 2006 21:09 UTC in reply to " I wonder"
vlado Member since:
2005-10-26

Primary, secondary is DOS invention. In UNIX there are partitions and slices. You can boot FreeBSD from any partition on any disk (if you install a bootloader). You can not expect to boot FreeBSD from DOS partition.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: I wonder
by MamiyaOtaru on Thu 13th Apr 2006 23:22 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: I wonder"
MamiyaOtaru Member since:
2005-11-11

Primary, secondary is DOS invention. ... You can boot FreeBSD from any partition on any disk

That certainly doesn't seem to be the case. If you are simply taking issue with his terminology, perhaps you should take issue with the FreeBSD folks as well.

From http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/install-p...

"A PC disk can be divided into discrete chunks. These chunks are called partitions. By design, the PC only supports four partitions per disk. These partitions are called primary partitions. To work around this limitation and allow more than four partitions, a new partition type was created, the extended partition. A disk may contain only one extended partition. Special partitions, called logical partitions, can be created inside this extended partition.

...

FreeBSD must be installed into a primary partition."

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: I wonder
by J-freebsd_98 on Fri 14th Apr 2006 00:21 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: I wonder"
J-freebsd_98 Member since:
2006-01-01

when I first used BSD I also did not have enuf space.
I put root and /var (or root and tmp) into a primary
partition.
I had space remaining in a "secondary dos" partition.
I formatted the space with BootIt shareware as type 165, bsd, and installed usr and tmp (or usr and var) into it.
so 2 of the 4 were in space within an extended partition. Remains for someone else to test whether
BootIt or something else can do the same procedure and
fully boot a BSD that is installed *if it will* into
a previously-formatted 165 "bsd" area within the
extended partition.

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: I wonder
by phoenix on Fri 14th Apr 2006 16:30 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: I wonder"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

The / filesystem (which contains the boot blocks, the laoder, and the kernel) of FreeBSD *must* reside on a primary (DOS) partition. All other filesystems can be on primary (DOS) or extended/logical (DOS) partitions.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: I wonder
by vlado on Sun 16th Apr 2006 05:56 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: I wonder"
vlado Member since:
2005-10-26

This is a misunderstanding. The handbook wants to tell you that you cannon create a FreeBSD partition inside a logical drive on extended partition. The origin of thes e troubles can be tracked to MS "concept" of primary and secondary partitions. In DOS you can have only 1 primary partition. Only MS knows why (maybe than you have no other partition to install something different. Even today when you install Windows they destroy your bootloader). In this case next partition must be "extended". Normally just create partitions (if you use FreeBSD fdisk utility you can create 4 "primary" partitions) and install a bootloader (FreeBSD native works well, but if you want more comfort GRUB is recommended). <gently flame=off>The complete message is that you must create a FreeBSD partition.

Reply Score: 1

Angel--Fr@gzill@
Member since:
2005-12-23

!!!

Well I think freBSD is fantastic. I'm happy they are almost in 6.1, always improving. I would like some more hardware recognition though...
I think I may install the RC1 or the stable 6.1in one machine to check it.
Anyway, I have been chekin Linuxtracker for the torrents with more leechers ( http://linuxtracker.org/index.php?sort=9 )and guess what... FreBSD is there, as one of the most torrented distros, in 3rd position...

But the most torrented and downloded FreeBSD relese is the 5.4 ???

!!!

Reply Score: 1

spikeb Member since:
2006-01-18

that's just wierd.

Reply Score: 1

Jedit, a successfully story
by siska on Fri 14th Apr 2006 05:58 UTC
siska
Member since:
2006-02-01

Yesterday I downloaded and installed it.
I also installed the packages from stable.
I then installed the java package for 6 from <a href="http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/downloads/java.shtml">here</....
It required javawmwrapper package and I installed it.
(It gave to me a warning because the version in stable is major than the one required by that tbz compiled for 6).
Then I went to jedit's website and downloaded it's jar and installed it.
Now I can do code with my fav editor.

The nice thing it that I have a small and slow machine, celeron 400 + 128MBram, and that I did all the previous steps with packages...what are ports ? ;-)

Nice job FreeBSD folks, now with the availability of the jdk binary package I don't have any reasons to use another OS.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Jedit, a successfully story
by dennis on Fri 14th Apr 2006 10:44 UTC
dennis
Member since:
2006-01-23

The nice thing it that I have a small and slow machine, celeron 400 + 128MBram, and that I did all the previous steps with packages...what are ports ? ;-)

Packages are compiled ports. Packages are mostly outdated, while ports are not (after updating them with "portsnap fetch; portsnap update"). See http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/ports.htm... for more explanation.

Reply Score: 1