Linked by Eugenia Loli on Tue 9th May 2006 09:01 UTC, submitted by kaiwai
FreeBSD "It is my great pleasure and privilege to announce the availability of FreeBSD 6.1-RELEASE. This release is the next step in the development of the 6.X branch, delivering several performance improvements, many bugfixes, and a few new features. These include: Addition of a keyboard multiplexer. This allows USB and PS/2 keyboards to coexist without any special options at boot. Many fixes for filesystem stability. High load stress tests are now run successfully on a regular basis as part of the normal FreeBSD QA process. Automatic configuration for man Bluetooth devices, as well as automatic support for running WiFi access points. Addition of drivers for new ethernet and SAS and SATA RAID controllers."
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Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by dhaneshr on Tue 9th May 2006 09:13 UTC
dhaneshr
Member since:
2006-01-13

I'm primarily a GNU/Linux user. Just would like to know the *easiest* way to update to Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD 6.1. I did try portupgrade method few months ago and it broke the entire installation.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by hevonen on Tue 9th May 2006 09:55 UTC in reply to "Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD"
hevonen Member since:
2006-05-09

Read /usr/ports/UPDATING

This file has vital information about changes in ports system. GNOME updates are usually listed there and include a link to FreeBSD's GNOME site where you can download a script that does upgrading without problems.
Use that script instead of portupgrade.

GNOME is so large and complicated set of interdependencies that portupgrade may not figure it out properly, that's why there's that script.

You could also install quite fresh GNOME from packages by using sysinstall.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by mezz on Tue 9th May 2006 11:45 UTC in reply to "RE: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD"
mezz Member since:
2005-06-29

This file has vital information about changes in ports system. GNOME updates are usually listed there and include a link to FreeBSD's GNOME site where you can download a script that does upgrading without problems.
Use that script instead of portupgrade.


No, you don't need the script now. Use portupgrade instead as stated in the /usr/ports/UPDATING.

GNOME is so large and complicated set of interdependencies that portupgrade may not figure it out properly, that's why there's that script.

Not anymore when we have found a bug in libtool. We no longer need the script, which portupgrade will working fine now.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by TechniCookie on Tue 9th May 2006 10:25 UTC in reply to "Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD"
TechniCookie Member since:
2005-11-09

The easiest way is installing the binary packages for 2.14. Heres how:

set PACKAGESITE to:

http://www.marcuscom.com/tb/packages/6.0-FreeBSD/Latest/

then pkg_add -r gnome2

But to use this method you have to remove your current gnome installation and possibly some of x.org first.

Edited 2006-05-09 10:28

Reply Score: 3

v RE: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by dindin on Tue 9th May 2006 14:00 UTC in reply to "Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD"
RE[2]: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by eMagius on Tue 9th May 2006 14:49 UTC in reply to "RE: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD"
eMagius Member since:
2005-07-06

I wonder if anyone is working on porting over OpenBSD's new pkg_tools -- they offer excellent package management without rocking the boat.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by molnarcs on Tue 9th May 2006 15:08 UTC in reply to "RE: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD"
molnarcs Member since:
2005-09-10

FreeBSD has binary package management - you can install, remove, upgrade binary packages with pkg_* tools. You can even create binary packages from software installed from ports, and then use those packages on other machines!

Ports system is outdated? What are you blathering about? It just works, and everyone loves it - it offers greater flexibility than binary-only systems, and what makes it really great is it's seamless integration with the binary package management system. With make package-recursive you can have binary packages automatically created in /usr/ports/packages, which you can export via NFS and you can install every package with pkg_add on other machines! FreeBSD offers the best of both worlds of source only and binary only systems.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by netpython on Thu 11th May 2006 05:07 UTC in reply to "Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD"
netpython Member since:
2005-07-06

A easy way of upgrading to gnome2.14 would be:

#portsnap fetch
#portsnap extract
#portsnap update
#portupgrade -rR x11/gnome2

If you have KDE installed as well you could get an error message like: avahi is blocking howl...error1

Just entering portupgrade -o net/avahi -f howl will fix.

From the muc.lists.freebsd.ports mailinglist:
is the equivalent of saying 'replace the installed package
xscreensaver-gnome with x11/gnome-screensaver'. In this case
these are two different ports, but they provide the same
functionality. In other cases, they will CONFLICT,
installing files with identical names in the same place.


the same is true for the lua package:

from the same mailinglist:[1]===> lua-5.0.2_1 conflicts with installed package(s):
lua-5.1

UPDATING/20060506 says to fix this with :

portupgrade -f -o lang/lua50 lua-5.1 [/i]

Hope this will help you enjoy gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD :-)

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by noescom on Thu 11th May 2006 08:33 UTC in reply to "RE: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD"
noescom Member since:
2006-05-09


#portsnap fetch
#portsnap extract
#portsnap update
#portupgrade -rR x11/gnome2


Doing an update after an extract makes no sense. You perform an extract only the first time you use portsnap to extract the ports tree as a whole. After that it's just update.

Reply Score: 1

shiny new
by kill on Tue 9th May 2006 10:29 UTC
kill
Member since:
2005-11-03

Oh well upgrade time. Hey, and they have the new logo on their website too. Great. Looks kinda odd having beastie together with the new logo. They should glass-up beastie too... or not!

Reply Score: 2

RE: shiny new
by twenex on Tue 9th May 2006 11:39 UTC in reply to "shiny new"
twenex Member since:
2006-04-21

The new logo and title font suck, imo.

Reply Score: 1

Just upgraded then: 6.0 -> 6.1
by kaiwai on Tue 9th May 2006 10:56 UTC
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

Just upgraded then, and compiled using the following switches in my make.conf file:

CFLAGS=-Os -march=pentiumpro

So far, everything is really stable, and what is even better, my iPod is now properly detected and shows up in the /dev directory! :-) I couldn't originally work out the problem, but it seems that since them fixing up the USB keyboard issue, they also inadvertantly fixed up the iPod issue at the same time.

I also have enabled SMP/HTT support as well via custom config (called TCHAIKOVSKY).

Right now, I'm doing a clean install, deleted all the custom ports, and rebuilding again - everything going very smoothly, hopefully in a few hours I'll have a nice 'n stable machine soon.

In regards to ULE scheduler, is there an ETA as to when it will be stable enough for every day use? I'm assuming the reason that the FreeBSD engineers have stuck with the 4.4BSD scheduler is because there are some issues still to be sorted with the ULE one.

Browser: Lynx/2.8.5rel.4 libwww-FM/2.14

Reply Score: 2

RE: Just upgraded then: 6.0 -> 6.1
by nick on Tue 9th May 2006 11:17 UTC in reply to "Just upgraded then: 6.0 -> 6.1"
nick Member since:
2006-04-17

In regards to ULE scheduler, is there an ETA as to when it will be stable enough for every day use? I'm assuming the reason that the FreeBSD engineers have stuck with the 4.4BSD scheduler is because there are some issues still to be sorted with the ULE one.

Last word (from a long time FreeBSD kernel hacker) is
that it is not in great shape, and it sounds like the
ETA is indefinite.

http://marc.theaimsgroup.com/?l=freebsd-performance&m=1147034374275...

Reply Score: 1

changing terminal font size in FeeBSD
by dhaneshr on Tue 9th May 2006 11:59 UTC
dhaneshr
Member since:
2006-01-13

Is there a way to change the terminal font size in freeBSD ala the vga=xxx kernel boot parameter in Linux ?

Reply Score: 2

adstro Member since:
2005-10-15

There is, but I think you have to use the vidcontrol(1) command. To make these changes take effect everytime you boot you may have to make an entry in the rc.conf file to set the font. Try looking at the handbook/man pages. The freebsd mailing lists are probably a better place to post this question.

Hopes this helps.

Edited 2006-05-09 13:08

Reply Score: 2

lopisaur Member since:
2006-02-27

Go into sysinstall, Configure, Console, Font.
Swiss has always been my choice.

Reply Score: 2

Am Downloading 6.1 As I write This...
by mattv427 on Tue 9th May 2006 13:36 UTC
mattv427
Member since:
2006-04-19

I started using FreeBSD at 4.10. I love it. 6.0 is real nice. I prefer KDE to Gnome for a desktop. Wireless works great. For some funny reason, FreeBSD never liked my U.S. Robotics USR5610B 56Kbps PCI Bus (Plug and Play) Internal PCI Performance Pro Fax Modem. I have yet been able to figure out why. Neither Debian nor Windows XP have any trouble with it, just FreeBSD. Just one of those things.

Reply Score: 1

Xen 3.x kernel?
by EmmEff on Tue 9th May 2006 15:03 UTC
EmmEff
Member since:
2005-09-16

Anybody working on this? I'm not a FreeBSD user, but I'd love to try it under Xen on my Linux machines.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Xen 3.x kernel?
by MattPie on Tue 9th May 2006 17:08 UTC in reply to "Xen 3.x kernel?"
MattPie Member since:
2006-04-18

It looks like some people are working on getting Xen merged into the FreeBSD 7 tree:
http://www.fsmware.com/

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by molnarcs on Tue 9th May 2006 15:04 UTC
molnarcs
Member since:
2005-09-10

Reply still doesn't work in konqueror (this is the only site I have problems with) - so I deleted the original message, and posted it as a reply in Firefox.

When will someone fix osnews?

Edited 2006-05-09 15:07

Reply Score: 3

Awesome
by mendicant on Tue 9th May 2006 15:12 UTC
mendicant
Member since:
2005-07-12

It's good to see another BSD release. Unfortunately, I recently have switched to using Gentoo for a few reasons that I won't get into here.

I'm hoping to be able to set up another BSD server in the future cause personally, I love it. Portupgrade might be showing a bit of age, but it's still powerful and the reason I ended up picking up FreeBSD back in about the 4.6 days.

Hmmm. Maybe I should do a conversion this weekend.... ;)

Reply Score: 1

Yum/Apt
by Don T. Bothers on Tue 9th May 2006 15:43 UTC
Don T. Bothers
Member since:
2006-03-15

What FreeBSD really needs is an official binary package update system similar to Yum or Apt. While there is no problem with how things are currently done when you have thousands of machines to administer, it really does become a hassle if you just have a few. For example, at home, I really would have liked to install FreeBSD, but I chose to install CentOS because I really do not have the time to patch that system up manually. With CentOS, I just have Yum scheduled to update the system. The same is true at my work place too. I have chosen to install about 8 CentOS systems. My preferred choice was FreeBSD but I really don't have time to manually keep the systems up to date at work either.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Yum/Apt
by spikeb on Tue 9th May 2006 15:55 UTC in reply to "Yum/Apt"
spikeb Member since:
2006-01-18

i'm sure there are ways to have one build machine and be able to push out updates to the rest of your machines.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Yum/Apt
by netpython on Tue 9th May 2006 16:01 UTC in reply to "Yum/Apt"
netpython Member since:
2005-07-06

I rather use emerge and apt if necessary.Yum is superceeded by smart long time ago :-)

Would be lovely to see the devs porting "emerge" to FreeBSD.Although portupgrade still serves me quite well.

Like "portupgrade -rR x11/gnome2",upgrades my currently installed gnome DE.


Eyecandy lays in the hands of the beholder.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Yum/Apt
by twenex on Tue 9th May 2006 16:15 UTC in reply to "RE: Yum/Apt"
twenex Member since:
2006-04-21

Would be lovely to see the devs porting "emerge" to FreeBSD.Although portupgrade still serves me quite well.

Check out the Gentoo/BSD project. There was an interview with one of the Gentoo/FreeBSD developers recently on one of the BSD news sites (daemonnews, maybe).

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Yum/Apt
by netpython on Tue 9th May 2006 17:00 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Yum/Apt"
netpython Member since:
2005-07-06

tnx!

Reply Score: 1

RE: Yum/Apt
by eydaimon on Tue 9th May 2006 23:53 UTC in reply to "Yum/Apt"
eydaimon Member since:
2006-03-22

I recall reading in the handbook where it suggests how you do packaging for "thousands" of machines. IIRC you make the packages for just one of the machines, then set the main host as the package site and update from there.

If you check portupdate, you will see it has a -P option for using packages if available, to do the updates.

Sometimes people need to do some more homework on what the best way to manage many hosts...you might have yum update each system independantly which is probably quite inneffcient if each host is having to download the packages.

Reply Score: 1

RE: RE: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by dennis on Tue 9th May 2006 17:03 UTC
dennis
Member since:
2006-01-23

GNOME updates are usually listed there and include a link to FreeBSD's GNOME site where you can download a script that does upgrading without problems.
Use that script instead of portupgrade.


It's funny you didn't read it yourself. ;)

20060429:
AFFECTS: All GNOME users
AUTHOR: gnome@FreeBSD.org

GNOME has been updated to 2.14. This new release does NOT require the
use of the gnome_upgrade.sh script. That script should not be used.
Instead, use the following simple recipe:

pkgdb -Ff
portupgrade -o net/avahi -f howl
portupgrade -o x11/gnome-screensaver -f xscreensaver-gnome
portupgrade -a

Reply Score: 4

RE: RE: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by dennis on Tue 9th May 2006 17:12 UTC
dennis
Member since:
2006-01-23

The source install via ports may or may not work, but its not going to give you such an improved performance that you spend 12hours compiling code in the hope that it works. I say this because I have gone through this every single time with every FreeBSD release. I am going to go through this again today.

I don't know where you talk about. I upgraded FreeBSD and GNOME many times on this desktop.

From FreeBSD 5.3-RELEASE to 6.1-RELEASE. I even upgraded to every BETA and RC on this box. I used GNOME on this box from 2.8 to 2.14. Before I used the script and the last time /usr/ports/UPDATING and portupgrade.

Be creative! In the past I had to do portupgrade several times to get GNOME complete, so what. It works like a charm after all. By the way this time the upgrade to 2.14 was very easy and went smooth.

Edited 2006-05-09 17:26

Reply Score: 4

RE: Yum/Apt
by dennis on Tue 9th May 2006 17:19 UTC
dennis
Member since:
2006-01-23

My preferred choice was FreeBSD but I really don't have time to manually keep the systems up to date at work either.

Are you telling you go sit and waiting for each install/compile? I personally don't get the point; what is the point if software is updated a few hours later? You don't have to wait, open a few terminals and run "portsnap fetch ; portsnap update ; portupgrade -a" and it does its job. Besides that, are there over 14000 packages available with Yum or APT-Get?

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Yum/Apt
by dindin on Tue 9th May 2006 17:36 UTC in reply to "RE: Yum/Apt"
dindin Member since:
2006-03-29

"You don't have to wait, open a few terminals and run "portsnap fetch ; portsnap update ; portupgrade -a" and it does its job. Besides that, are there over 14000 packages available with Yum or APT-Get?"

That is the issue. We end up waiting for a long time.

And those 14000 packages are not always maintained. Are you saying all 14000 packages are well tested and will install without any issues on a FreeBSD system? The number of packages is not appropriate measurement here.

Take Ubuntu for example. Couple of years ago no one ever heard of it. Now its one of the most popular distros out there. Lets face it. They are not touting their umpteen thousands of packages. They made it easy and simple to use, manage, and install applications.

FreeBSD is good for many tasks but being a desktop is not one - not right now. I have been a BSD user for many years and I would love to see this change but until then I will not be directing beginers to it.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Yum/Apt
by noescom on Tue 9th May 2006 18:23 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Yum/Apt"
noescom Member since:
2006-05-09

They are not touting their umpteen thousands of packages

From the Ubuntu.com website: "Ubuntu includes more than 16,000 pieces of software". They appear to do exactly that.

I have to disagree that BSD is not ready for the desktop: the FreeBSD ports system includes everything you need, such as KDE and Gnome. I even know a BSD 'distro' that's aimed primarily at the desktop: PC-BSD http://www.pcbsd.org/.

Reply Score: 4

RE[4]: Yum/Apt
by Mediv on Wed 10th May 2006 12:20 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Yum/Apt"
Mediv Member since:
2006-05-10

noescom talked about PC-BSD, but there is also DesktopBSD: http://www.desktopbsd.org/

What is nice with this "version" of FreeBSD is that it is so compatible with the "normal" FreeBSD that they have put their tools into the FreeBSD port system, in sysutils/desktopbsd-tools

Combined with KDE, it may ease the use of FreeBSD for new users. For instance, there are tools to easily mount/unmount devices, to create users, and I love the GUI to manage ports.

It is less powerfull than with a textual terminal, but it may be a start.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Yum/Apt
by da_Chicken on Tue 9th May 2006 23:23 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Yum/Apt"
da_Chicken Member since:
2006-01-01

Take Ubuntu for example. Couple of years ago no one ever heard of it. Now its one of the most popular distros out there. Lets face it. They are not touting their umpteen thousands of packages. They made it easy and simple to use, manage, and install applications.

Ubuntu, of course, is based on Debian, one of the biggest and oldest GNU/Linux distros. That explains the large number of packages and the sophisticated package management system that Ubuntu has -- it all comes from Debian.

FreshPorts http://www.freshports.org/ has some statistics about FreeBSD's Ports.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Yum/Apt
by toomany on Wed 10th May 2006 10:33 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Yum/Apt"
toomany Member since:
2005-11-09

Well... Really, Debian has a great amount of packages (more than FreeBSD ports) only because the majority of them, are splitted in smallest packages. An examples; postgresql, bind, mysql, etc, etc.
I will apologize about the inconvenient of my bad english... sorry for that.

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Yum/Apt
by da_Chicken on Wed 10th May 2006 13:20 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Yum/Apt"
da_Chicken Member since:
2006-01-01

The point that I was trying to make was not about the number of available packages. The passage I quoted seems to suggest that Ubuntu has developed a sophisticated package management system and a large amount of packages within just a few years. An equivalent statement would be that DesktopBSD has developed a robust operating system with an advanced package management within just a few years.

I pointed out that it takes a lot of time and work to develop such features. DesktopBSD is excellent because it's built on FreeBSD. Similarly, Ubuntu has become popular because it's based on the work done in Debian.

But if you wish to discuss the number of available packages in Debian and FreeBSD, please consider that splitting applications into many binary packages is a way of introducing modularity and flexibility into a binary package management system. It gives you more choices about which features you want to install and which you don't. Debian (and Ubuntu) have a complicated dependency handling system that has optional "recommends" and "suggests" in addition to "depends". Debian's apt-get can be used to build individual packages from source (fetching their build dependencies) and there's apt-build that more or less equals FreeBSD's Ports. With apt-build you can rebuild your whole Debian system from source, using your own optimizations. Debian is also known for the rigorous quality assurance of packages, especially for the packages that are accepted to stable releases.

"apt-cache stats" for binary packages in Debian stable:
Total package names : 20005
Normal packages: 15681

"apt-cache stats" for binary packages in Debian testing:
Total package names : 22304
Normal packages: 17197

"apt-cache stats" for binary packages in Debian unstable:
Total package names : 23783
Normal packages: 18368

There are also loads of unofficial packages available for Debian and most of these are listed at http://www.apt-get.org/ Of course, you don't get any security-related or bug-fixing support for these unofficial packages.

Reply Score: 1

RE: RE[2]: Yum/Apt
by dennis on Tue 9th May 2006 17:58 UTC
dennis
Member since:
2006-01-23

FreeBSD is good for many tasks but being a desktop is not one - not right now. I have been a BSD user for many years and I would love to see this change but until then I will not be directing beginers to it.

I simply do not agree with that. I am not in a hurry. I do my things while on virtual desktop number 4 a terminal with portupgrade runs. I don't care to have the new Firefox a few hours later while the current installed one does its job very good. :-)

Let's make things clear. The fact is not FreeBSD "is good for many tasks but being a desktop is not one - not right now". The fact is *you* don't think it's ready. ;-)

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: RE[3]: Yum/Apt
by twenex on Tue 9th May 2006 18:14 UTC in reply to "RE: RE[2]: Yum/Apt"
twenex Member since:
2006-04-21

And I don't think Windows is ready. I troll you not.

Am I right in thinking you can pkg_add packagex, then make install clean it from source, and use the package whilst your port is compiling? This works on Gentoo.

Reply Score: 1

Downloading now
by DrillSgt on Tue 9th May 2006 18:05 UTC
DrillSgt
Member since:
2005-12-02

This should be a nice release. Have not used FreeBSD since 4.8, so am looking forward to trying this out again.

Reply Score: 1

RE: RE[2]: RE[3]: Yum/Apt
by dennis on Tue 9th May 2006 18:46 UTC
dennis
Member since:
2006-01-23

Am I right in thinking you can pkg_add packagex, then make install clean it from source, and use the package whilst your port is compiling? This works on Gentoo.

You can in first place do a "pkg_add -rv $package" en then do a "portsnap fetch ; portsnap update ; portupgrade -a". The "old" version works fine untill portupgrade is ready with the new one.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: RE[3]: RE[4]: Yum/Apt
by netpython on Wed 10th May 2006 16:52 UTC in reply to "RE: RE[2]: RE[3]: Yum/Apt"
netpython Member since:
2005-07-06

You can in first place do a "pkg_add -rv $package" en then do a "portsnap fetch ; portsnap update ; portupgrade -a". The "old" version works fine untill portupgrade is ready with the new one.

You forgot the:"portsnap extract"?

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: RE[4]: RE[5]: Yum/Apt
by noescom on Wed 10th May 2006 17:34 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: RE[3]: RE[4]: Yum/Apt"
noescom Member since:
2006-05-09

You do 'portsnap extract' only the first time to extract the whole ports tree. After that it's update.

Edited 2006-05-10 17:35

Reply Score: 1

Grr...
by Gunblade on Thu 11th May 2006 00:32 UTC
Gunblade
Member since:
2005-07-21

No love for ppc

Reply Score: 1

RE: RE: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by dennis on Thu 11th May 2006 09:23 UTC
dennis
Member since:
2006-01-23

A easy way of upgrading to gnome2.14 would be:

#portsnap fetch
#portsnap extract
#portsnap update
#portupgrade -rR x11/gnome2


Not true. The correct way would be (RTFM => /usr/ports/UPDATING):

portsnap fetch
portsnap update
pkgdb -Ff
portupgrade -o net/avahi -f howl
portupgrade -o x11/gnome-screensaver -f xscreensaver-gnome
portupgrade -a

Edited 2006-05-11 09:24

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: RE: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD
by netpython on Thu 11th May 2006 10:04 UTC in reply to "RE: RE: Gnome 2.14 on FreeBSD"
netpython Member since:
2005-07-06

portupgrade -a

This ugrades all packages (not only x11/gnome2).
If that is intentional would a "portupgrade -arR" (install upgrades of dependancies also) not be more desirable?

Reply Score: 1

Better Than 386BSD 0.1
by NormalBloke on Thu 11th May 2006 10:10 UTC
NormalBloke
Member since:
2006-05-11

This release is somewhat better than 386BSD 0.1 which is the first version of "FreeBSD" that I used quite a few years ago.

Reply Score: 1