Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 21st May 2006 22:09 UTC, submitted by jayson.knight
Windows "Shipping with Windows Vista will be the latest version of Internet Information Services (IIS), which includes a broad collection of features and capabilities that have been anxiously awaited by both developers and IT Pros. Scott Guthrie and Bill Staples describe and demo new features in IIS 7.0."
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v Not interesting!
by kenjiru on Sun 21st May 2006 22:46 UTC
v Meh
by Caspian on Sun 21st May 2006 23:05 UTC
...
by Mitarai on Sun 21st May 2006 23:10 UTC
Mitarai
Member since:
2005-07-28

I bet none of you saw the article.

Edited 2006-05-21 23:18

Reply Score: 4

Great
by dcga on Sun 21st May 2006 23:19 UTC
dcga
Member since:
2005-07-06

The fact that other products have many or all of the new features that ISS is getting, does not make this realease less great than it already is.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Great
by Babi Asu on Mon 22nd May 2006 01:03 UTC in reply to "Great"
Babi Asu Member since:
2006-02-11

5.0 is horrible, 6.0 is good, and 7.0 release is great. With ASP.NET, it's ready for building enterprise application. Apache alone is not comparable to IIS, it must be integrated with Tomcat + JBoss for building J2EE based enterprise application.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Great
by bouh on Mon 22nd May 2006 04:58 UTC in reply to "RE: Great"
bouh Member since:
2005-10-27

Honestly, your replay, and all other comments makes me wonder if you really ever developed ready-for-production application under .NET.

Let me give you an insight on how much my 11 month project using lastest .NET Framework was a nightmare as a developer.

The first things you have to know is that we are using entirely Microsoft products to do this job. So I use the visual studio development suite to code and visual source safe as a versionning system. Don't know if you noticed but, IIS is closely related to .NET to an extended where it doesn't do what you want anymore!

The common people will use IIS to server pages right? Now to Microsoft concept IIS has become more than that: it is not a web page server anymore, it has long became an application server. Thanks to this nice functionalty as an application server you end up with REALLY UGLY software designs:

- I want to create an new ASP/.NET project: If my projet is not located in <inetpub/wwwroot> it will failed to open a web projet! I have to manually edit the solution file.
- I want to edit one of my projet's file and this project is a web application projet: he needs a communication with IIS to open the FILE by default which take ages to open! But I just wanted to open a simple file!!!
- I want to deploy my application, deploying is made easy with web app because you only deploy on the server: great advantage. Ow gosh! Because my deployement machine ASP credential are under the NETWORK_SERVICE account and those on my development machine are handeled by ASP_NET (worker process) (this difference is due to the OS: Windows XP uses ASP_NET, windows 2003 uses NETWORK_SERVICE, my files access permissions settings are now wrong
- I want to get a web projet from VSS, I need to install it into <inetpub>/wwwroot again, even if it not this way in the VSS hierarchy: it automatically modifies the hierarchy according to your IIS configuration
- Seriously I plenty of other exemple like that: HTML mode edition not working, file permission problem with the ASP worker account when tryin to access ORACLE, etc

Microsoft has been trying too much to do a all-integrated solution.... IT'S TOO MUCH Please also distribute a heavily slimmed down version of IIS and your development environement.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Great
by bouh on Mon 22nd May 2006 06:30 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Great"
bouh Member since:
2005-10-27

I am sorry. I am replying to myself, just to tell that I have been writing this post in a hurry, and my english here is really poor. I made lot's of gramatical mistakes, not to mention I forgot many words. That makes the reading very difficult. Shame on me.

Reply Score: 0

RE[3]: Great
by hustomte on Mon 22nd May 2006 09:53 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Great"
hustomte Member since:
2006-01-07

"Microsoft has been trying too much ... distribute a heavily slimmed down version of IIS and your development environement."

Amen to that.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Great
by pdman on Mon 22nd May 2006 14:48 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Great"
pdman Member since:
2006-05-22

Quote" - I want to create an new ASP/.NET project: If my projet is not located in <inetpub/wwwroot> it will failed to open a web projet! I have to manually edit the solution file.
- I want to edit one of my projet's file and this project is a web application projet: he needs a communication with IIS to open the FILE by default which take ages to open! But I just wanted to open a simple file!!! "


Your statements clearly shows your inexperience in this environment... and I'm suprised that after 11 months, you could not figure this out!!! Anyone who has little experience with IIS (4,5,6) knows that inetpub/wwwroot is the DEFAULT locacion and NOT the ONLY location to create a virtual directory... If you want to create a web project in a location, you must first create the virtual directory to point to that location. You can do this from IIS manager or from the target folder's properties under the "Web Sharing" tab. You notice that I've not mentioned .net because these are simple IIS configuration tasks. You can also run asp.net under any account of your choosing. This stuff isn't magic, you have to do some work as well... my advice to you is get some training.

Edited 2006-05-22 14:49

Reply Score: 5

RE[4]: Great
by eggs on Tue 23rd May 2006 15:45 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Great"
eggs Member since:
2006-01-23

You are right! Not that hard to get it working, but in defense of the GP with VS2003 it is a huge pain to get it to open a web project when you start moving the directories around. Sometimes it just doesn't want to work. Thankfully this has been fixed in VS2005 which has a MUCH more intuitive way of opening projects (right off the filesystem).

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Great
by aquila_deus on Mon 22nd May 2006 12:05 UTC in reply to "RE: Great"
aquila_deus Member since:
2005-10-02

I doubt IIS 7's capability is anywhere near that of WebLogic or other J2EE servers...

At least it should support externalized environment-dependent configs such as the database connection string - it's really messy to mix them with the fixed config items (ex: http modules) in web.config.

Reply Score: 0

Hrm..
by Tuishimi on Mon 22nd May 2006 04:18 UTC
Tuishimi
Member since:
2005-07-06

I have wondered for several years now if we should have switched from IIS/ASP to Java/JSP... Ah well.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Hrm..
by aquila_deus on Mon 22nd May 2006 12:10 UTC in reply to "Hrm.."
aquila_deus Member since:
2005-10-02

IMHO JSP itself is nothing better than ASP with more headaches for developers, and a complete tech failure. Why not try JSF, Tapestry, or other modern frameworks?

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Hrm..
by Tuishimi on Mon 22nd May 2006 14:57 UTC
Tuishimi
Member since:
2005-07-06

Ha ha! ;) Well... now that you mention it... when we started our transition (moving our products off iis/asp to oas) struts was not as "big" as it had become... so for our first product we wrote our own tag libraries, controller, etc. By the time we finished that, we wrote our first SOAP app... then struts was introduced (to us).

Our next several apps were written using struts... now there is talk about the other frameworks as you mentioned. The PROBLEM is writing reusable components. It is easy to say you should write logical chunks of code that are 100% reusable... in practice this isn't always as easy as it seems it should be and then you are left with duplicated code, etc... so everytime we switch to some different framework we are rewriting a chunk of code here, a chunk there... ick.

Right now our big PUSH is a project to implement a group of shared services, which replaces our domain/workbench model. But it never ends... everytime we come up with a better way of doing things, a new and even BETTER method/framework/whatever comes along and we start over.

This is not a very effective way to manage resources. We should pick a framework/methodology of code reuse and STICK with it. I'd rather see something ancient and functional than have to rewrite our code every 2 years. But no one listens to me because everyone wants to learn and know the "latest technology" because it looks better on their resumes, should they ever decide to leave.

Reply Score: 1

bouh
by dcga on Mon 22nd May 2006 18:51 UTC
dcga
Member since:
2005-07-06

You clearly did NOT watch nor read the damn article.
Please do so before trolling.
Thanks

Reply Score: 1