Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 5th Jun 2006 21:57 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Chinese computer supplier Lenovo has denied a report that it is planning to stop offering Linux on its range of PCs and laptops. On Friday, CRN reported that Frank Kardonski, Lenovo's worldwide product manager for its 3000 series, had indicated that Linux support was being dropped. But Lenovo made strenuous efforts on Monday to set the record straight, emphasizing that Kardonski provided incorrect information to CRN and that the company plans to continue to offer Linux on ThinkPads.
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hmmm
by kmare on Mon 5th Jun 2006 22:32 UTC
kmare
Member since:
2006-02-05

I wonder how many complaints they received about removing support on linux...

Reply Score: 5

Nothing has changed
by Wes Felter on Mon 5th Jun 2006 22:38 UTC
Wes Felter
Member since:
2005-11-15

Since they never supported Linux to begin with, it doesn't count as "ditching"...

Reply Score: 1

RE: Nothing has changed
by somebody on Mon 5th Jun 2006 23:13 UTC in reply to "Nothing has changed"
somebody Member since:
2005-07-07

Since they never supported Linux to begin with, it doesn't count as "ditching"...

I doubt it would be so, at least by this comment at the end of the article.

[copied from article]
"Linux vendor Red Hat, a key IBM ally, was thrown into some confusion by CRN's report.

"Everybody here is using Lenovo or IBM ThinkPads," a senior Red Hat executive told ZDNet UK. "I don't think what Lenovo (is reported to be doing) would impact our business. Anyway, if it's true, it won't impact us for much longer."


It seems to me more like Lenovo had some deal with IBM, which extended to RH.

Reply Score: 1

Hhmmff
by jaylaa on Mon 5th Jun 2006 23:44 UTC
jaylaa
Member since:
2006-01-17

I saw articles about Lenovo "ditching" Linux on several mainstream news websites.

Somehow I doubt that the correction will be as widely publicized.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Hhmmff
by hobgoblin on Tue 6th Jun 2006 08:25 UTC in reply to "Hhmmff"
hobgoblin Member since:
2005-07-06

thats the tabloid press for you...

Reply Score: 1

can't say no to Linux
by butters on Tue 6th Jun 2006 00:11 UTC
butters
Member since:
2005-07-08

What I find interesting about this PR blunder is that it shows that Lenovo really would lose significant business if they pulled Linux support. Even if it wouldn't impact the core business laptop market, it would cause Linux-based businesses around the world to stop buying Lenovo and destroy cooperation with the kernel developers. Companies like Red Hat, Novell, and (ironically) IBM would phase out Lenovo products.

There are enough vocal parties demanding Linux support that it's becoming really bad PR to do anything but expand Linux support, and even then the bloggers say it's not enough.

As for their current Linux support, it says that you have to acquire a license for your Linux distribution before they will preload it. This probably means that only RHEL and maybe SLES are supported, and you can't get them preload something like Fedora or Ubuntu. I wonder if they allow a "no OS" option. I don't see one on their basic direct-market website.

Reply Score: 5

Good news
by CrimsonScythe on Tue 6th Jun 2006 00:33 UTC
CrimsonScythe
Member since:
2005-07-10

I'm glad to see that it was not only just a humongous PR-screwup, but that Lenovo's actually going to start selling ThinkPads with Linux preinstalled next quarter! Actually, I'm mostly just glad to see that they're not going to be Microsoft-exclusive.

I'll also have to say that they're back on my vendor-list again. Good thing too, since I really like their products, expensive as they are.

Reply Score: 2

All I say is ...
by de_wizze on Tue 6th Jun 2006 00:49 UTC
de_wizze
Member since:
2005-10-31

... their actions should speak louder than words. To say we support but not truely support is worse that to have somesone make a PR blunder only for people to know fully well thats not what is happening.

Reply Score: 1

RE: All I say is ...
by butters on Tue 6th Jun 2006 03:02 UTC in reply to "All I say is ..."
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

As I said a few posts above, whenever some company decides to expand Linux support, some faction of the free software community is perhaps less satisfied than they were before. I'm as much a part of the "revolution" as anybody, but I just can't understand why some people think that no progress is somehow better than partial progress.

The only established companies that dive head-first into open source are the ones that have no better options. Everybody else moves as the slice of the pie gets larger. There are companies that have basically bet their business on open source, and I believe that's a business model that will pay off. Already some of these companies are in the black, but for every one of those, there's probably 10 others that are still operating at a loss. For most businesses there's no real advantage to "getting in on the ground floor," and they'll wait until more open source businesses are profitable before seriously investing in open source.

I'm not sure I'd want to run whatever Linux flavor Lenovo would choose to support anyway, and there's no way any sane mass-market PC vendor would support more than 1 or maybe 2 distros. That's probably fine for most users, but for me (and most of the super-fanatics), I'd rather buy a machine with a blank hard disk anyway, and this is why I don't understand why the idealists are so wound up about hardware vendors supporting Linux distributions. Actually, I would suppose you guys would prefer to pay your support contact or license fee to your favorite distributor than through a hardware vendor like Lenovo.

Reply Score: 1

anybody know?
by mipeligro on Tue 6th Jun 2006 05:25 UTC
mipeligro
Member since:
2006-06-03

are the newer lenovo thinkpads as good as the ibm designed ones were?

Reply Score: 1

RE: anybody know?
by qroon on Tue 6th Jun 2006 12:18 UTC in reply to "anybody know?"
qroon Member since:
2005-10-21

All I know is that the Lenovo Thinkpads got a Windows Key ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: anybody know?
by lord_rob on Tue 6th Jun 2006 14:03 UTC in reply to "RE: anybody know?"
lord_rob Member since:
2005-08-06

:/ Glad to have bought a R52 then. Even if it's made by lenovo, it seems to be one of the last models that has no useless key ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: anybody know?
by Sphinx on Tue 6th Jun 2006 17:43 UTC in reply to "RE: anybody know?"
Sphinx Member since:
2005-07-09

The windows key on mine launches skippy-xd
http://gnnix.org/resource/screen03.jpg

Reply Score: 1

Wow
by davisable on Tue 6th Jun 2006 08:03 UTC
davisable
Member since:
2005-07-10

What a bunch of idiots.

First it's:

"We will not have models available for Linux, and we do not have custom order, either," said Frank Kardonski, Lenovo's worldwide product manager. "What you see is what you get. And at this point, it's Windows."

Could you possibly sound more like an arrogant ass than with that above quote?

And now, after the flaming they get on the net over the dumb statement above, they backpedal. Either way, I'm not going to buy anything from a company this stupid--statement retracted or not.

Edited 2006-06-06 08:03

Reply Score: 1

oppoistire
by nealsaferstein on Tue 6th Jun 2006 09:11 UTC
nealsaferstein
Member since:
2006-06-03

China is going to require all computers LINUX compatible?

Neal Saferstein

Reply Score: 0

I call this
by Brmbolec on Tue 6th Jun 2006 11:17 UTC
Brmbolec
Member since:
2005-07-23

Marketing job well done, all news servers made advertisement for Lenovo, and they will repeat it this week ;)
--
Pixel image editor - http://www.kanzelsberger.com

Edited 2006-06-06 11:17

Reply Score: 1

RE: Wow
by Soulbender on Tue 6th Jun 2006 11:51 UTC
Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

"And now, after the flaming they get on the net over
the dumb statement above,"

I think it has more to do with wanting/needing to sell units to the Taiweanese government than it has with being flamed on suckdot et al.

Edited 2006-06-06 11:51

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: All I say is ...
by kaiwai on Wed 7th Jun 2006 03:53 UTC
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

As I said a few posts above, whenever some company decides to expand Linux support, some faction of the free software community is perhaps less satisfied than they were before. I'm as much a part of the "revolution" as anybody, but I just can't understand why some people think that no progress is somehow better than partial progress.

The issue isn't about Linux, but giving consumers choice when they purchase their machine; they're able to choose how much ram is installed; what type of graphics card, the type of screen and mouse - so why should operating systems be any different?

Same goes for those who wish to have nothing installed; how come to the cost of a 'bare computer' is only fractionally less than one installed with Windows? if I take the monitor off the packages, the full cost of the monitor is removed, if I downgrade the memory, the difference is removed from the cost; but when it comes to removing Windows off the machine, there is next to no difference; what is even WORSE, there is no choice for saying 'no' to the symantec/mcaffee application bundles that OEM's include - sure, some people might like them, but what about those who don't want them? how about the end user, employed by a company with a 'Select Licencing' with Microsoft, which gives him or her access to all the Microsoft software? he or she effectively pays for things he or she will never actually use.

Reply Score: 1