Linked by Eugenia Loli on Mon 10th Jul 2006 22:44 UTC
Geek stuff, sci-fi... Computers of the future could be controlled by eye movements, rather than a mouse or keyboard. Scientists at Imperial College, London, are working on eye-tracking technology that analyses the way we look at things. The team is trying to gain an insight into visual knowledge - the way we see objects and translate that information into actions.
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What if..
by Nelson on Mon 10th Jul 2006 23:16 UTC
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

I blink?

Reply Score: 1

Eye strain
by Bonus on Mon 10th Jul 2006 23:18 UTC
Bonus
Member since:
2005-12-23

I am more for the science health and sfaety reason stated rather then web surfing.

Reply Score: 4

the Eye, natures way to prevent RSI
by cies on Mon 10th Jul 2006 23:19 UTC
cies
Member since:
2005-11-28

funny that RSI is already adressed by nature.

our eyes (yes we have two!) are our main navigators in the our information enviroment. two lubricated balls, fully embedded in and suppored by our fore head, that are moved by some short, supple muscles -- with very little friction.

we don't need to cure RSI, we just have to pick the tools (that are give to us) to do the job.

cies breijs.

Reply Score: 3

vimh Member since:
2006-02-04

Pick the tools? Well your hands are some of the tools given to you to do the job.

Eyes the main navigators? In a sense...no pun intended. But in doing a lot of things, touch is a major factor and the our so called hand-eye coordination is what gets the job done. Working with one and not the other can be difficult.

RSI... I can "see" that monster of a migrane coming from here.

So is that left wink for left click, right wink for right click and double blink for the double click (since you blink naturally anyway)?

Reply Score: 1

Rugmonster Member since:
2005-11-18

RSI... I can "see" that monster of a migrane coming from here.

You look where you move the mouse pointer anyway. This may just reduce the number of things involved here. Combine this with voice recognition or even sub-vocalization, and you may not have to use your hands for doing a large portion of the things we do on computers today.

Reply Score: 1

Cloudy Member since:
2006-02-15

You look where you move the cursor, but that only approximately puts it near the center of your field of view.

The problem with past attempts at eye tracking is that they all end up with you needing to make unnaturally precise eye movements and led to various kinds of stress depending on what was attempted.

There's a reason why mice are ubiquitous but eye movement (and hand gesture) systems aren't: scale of motion.

Reply Score: 1

Fransexy Member since:
2005-07-29

You look where you move the mouse pointer anyway. This may just reduce the number of things involved here. Combine this with voice recognition or even sub-vocalization, and you may not have to use your hands for doing a large portion of the things we do on computers today.

Hurra!!!! at last i will have the hands free when i browse porno sites ;-)

Reply Score: 1

How do I...
by Joe User on Mon 10th Jul 2006 23:35 UTC
Joe User
Member since:
2005-06-29

- Click?
- Right-click?
- Middle-click?!!

Reply Score: 1

RE: How do I...
by rayiner on Mon 10th Jul 2006 23:51 UTC in reply to "How do I..."
rayiner Member since:
2005-07-06

Poke yourself in the eye with one, two, or three fingers.

Reply Score: 4

RE: How do I...
by aliquis on Tue 11th Jul 2006 03:13 UTC in reply to "How do I..."
aliquis Member since:
2005-07-23

Get a Mac (one mouse button, yeah I know you can have more) and use space/enter/whatever as mouse button ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE: How do I...
by CVDpr on Tue 11th Jul 2006 06:17 UTC in reply to "How do I..."
CVDpr Member since:
2005-10-17

CLick = Blink Left-eye.
Right-Click = Blink Right-eye.
Middle-Click = Blink boths.

O_o

Reply Score: 1

Canon did this in '96
by JacobMunoz on Mon 10th Jul 2006 23:38 UTC
JacobMunoz
Member since:
2006-03-17

Canon's been making camcorders with eye-motion control for a while, it's about time computers picked this up.

Reply Score: 1

Too soon to say
by Lengsel on Mon 10th Jul 2006 23:39 UTC
Lengsel
Member since:
2006-04-19

As a consumer, because of time required for stability and especially accuracy, I would not give this another thought for 10 more years. Anything that is entirely dependant on a body movement requires a long time for development, if ever at all. I'm talking for retail market-type quality for something like this.

Reply Score: 1

Phillip.Fayers
Member since:
2005-12-14

Take a look at http://www.cs.utk.edu/~shuford/terminal/engelbart_mouse_alternative...
which contains a copy of an email from Doug Engelbart - inventor of the mouse. In the brief note he comments on other methods they considered, including eye tracking.

Ever since then people have considered eye tracking as a pointer controller, but its mostly easier to use your hand.

Commercial eye tracking mice have been available for sometime, having been developed in various places to allow people with disabilities easier use of a compter. Take a look at http://www.eyetechds.com/ for example.

As for the Canon stuff they made SLRs with eye tracking for focus control sometime ago, then gave up becuase it didn't work. Their first attempt at a video camera with eye driven focusing wasn't much better either, to quote from http://www.diku.dk/~panic/eyegaze/node22.html During normal use the video camera can all of a sudden fail to track the eye properly, which forces the user to make sudden movements with the eyes to regain correct tracking. A white square is constantly displaying where the user is looking. We think this must be a very annoying feature, since you cannot avoid looking at this "fly" hovering in front of your eyes all the time.

Reply Score: 2

Not a good way to do things...
by Jawbreaker4Fs on Tue 11th Jul 2006 00:14 UTC
Jawbreaker4Fs
Member since:
2006-05-11

I doubt that moving your mouse with your eyesight will catch on. There are too many things that can't be done intiutively (clicking, dragging, etc.) with your eyes that are better served by the good old point-and-click mouse. Additionally, there are too many things we do with our eyes subconciously that would produce unintended results. For example, say I'm reading a Dvorak article and roll my eyes at his audacious claims.. suddenly I'm up to my eyeballs (excuse the pun) in new browser windows, or I've closed the window completely.

I don't see this as a practical replacement for the mouse.. although I agree with Bonus that there are probably some useful scientific and medical applications for such technology.

Reply Score: 2

Focus follows brain
by gregk on Tue 11th Jul 2006 00:48 UTC
gregk
Member since:
2006-03-13

Just one step closer to the nirana of "Focus Follows Brain"

Reply Score: 1

Doh! Nirvana
by gregk on Tue 11th Jul 2006 00:50 UTC in reply to "Focus follows brain"
gregk Member since:
2006-03-13

That's what I get for posting with Opera instead of Konq, no spell check.

Reply Score: 1

Force Feedback
by setuid_w00t on Tue 11th Jul 2006 00:48 UTC
setuid_w00t
Member since:
2005-10-22

When will there be a fore feedback version that can be used to stab video game players in the eyes?

Reply Score: 1

Doh! Nirvana
by gregk on Tue 11th Jul 2006 00:49 UTC
gregk
Member since:
2006-03-13

That's what I get for posting with Opera instead of Konq, no spell check.

Reply Score: 1

RE: How do I...
by sbenitezb on Tue 11th Jul 2006 03:02 UTC
sbenitezb
Member since:
2005-07-22

Just blink your left or right eye like you do with your mouse. Middle click doesn't work because the system may take it like a normal blink. Apparently they are going to implement middle click with a mouth action. Just open you mouth wide open and the gesture triggers a middle click.

Reply Score: 1

I've wanted this for so long
by aliquis on Tue 11th Jul 2006 03:12 UTC
aliquis
Member since:
2005-07-23

Windows follow EYE focus plz ffs!

I hate when I type something and it doesn't come there I look ;)

Reply Score: 1

What a crap
by Wowbagger on Tue 11th Jul 2006 04:23 UTC
Wowbagger
Member since:
2005-07-06

Everybody who know the least bit about human perception knows that the natural eye movement is extremely jumpy and all over the place most of the time.

Having to force yourself to make accurate non jumpy eye movements is worse than having to handle a 5kg mouse while making a handstand during an earthquake.

This will make you ill for sure.

Reply Score: 3

Already exists
by gothicknight on Tue 11th Jul 2006 09:53 UTC
gothicknight
Member since:
2005-07-06

A teacher and a student here at Guarda - Portugal already had that implemented see http://www.magickey.ipg.pt/ (only in pt_PT).
The version isn't opensource (i've tried to talk them out) but it's used in cooperation with a child help fundation, the only price payed is from the fundation to the service of adapting every copy of the program to the person's eye, so it's kind of free as free beer.

Reply Score: 1

Snowball
by AmigaRobbo on Tue 11th Jul 2006 10:57 UTC
AmigaRobbo
Member since:
2005-11-15

Anyone remember the old Level 9 Text (!) Adventure Snowball? Set on a huge great space ship, and interacting with the computer by typing in "look at 1", "Blink" etc etc..

Great fun!

Reply Score: 1

RE: Snowball
by Sparrowhawk on Tue 11th Jul 2006 12:55 UTC in reply to "Snowball"
Sparrowhawk Member since:
2005-07-11

"Anyone remember the old Level 9 Text (!) Adventure Snowball? Set on a huge great space ship, and interacting with the computer by typing in "look at 1", "Blink" etc etc.. "

Good grief! Yes I remember that one - I never finished it though. Something like 7,000 locations iirc. Bit of a big L9 fan generally though. Red Moon! ;)

In terms of the technology, I think somebody in a previous post got it spot on - a combination of eye and voice control would work best:

"Pick Up", "Drop", "Open", "Delete", etc, together with a cursor linked to what you are looking at at the time. At least I think so, it's hard to say unless you try it.

I thought this kind of technology was already available to fighter plane pilots though? Is this the same kind of thing?

Reply Score: 1

Piece of crap...
by Terracotta on Tue 11th Jul 2006 15:46 UTC
Terracotta
Member since:
2005-08-15

Eyes move way to fast from one object to another, so focusing on one thing is really hard, the nice thing of having a mouse is that it doesn't move all the time. Although it is nice to see what they're capable of, it won't be usefull anytime soon.

Reply Score: 1