Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 5th Sep 2006 14:46 UTC, submitted by Beta
BeOS & Derivatives The HaikuPodcast.com team has made a video entitled "The Introduction to Haiku", in high quality divx or low-quality m4v, to honour Haiku's 5th birthday. Of course you could always install and experience it first hand, but if that's not an option, this video may come in handy.
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confused
by stestagg on Tue 5th Sep 2006 15:20 UTC
stestagg
Member since:
2006-06-03

Erm. am I missing something or was that just a bit pointless?

Haiku can: show the time in the deskbar. Show time in a window. Set the time to different timezones. Change desktop color...

It's nice to see the project developing but I feel I've wasted 8 minutes of my life watching something that could have been run on windows 3.1 (maybe 95 ;) ).

hell, we didn't even get the teapot ;)

Stephen.

Reply Score: 4

RE: confused
by HanZo on Tue 5th Sep 2006 15:26 UTC in reply to "confused"
HanZo Member since:
2006-03-10

well I agree.
I really hope Haiku will be ready soon and that we can lay hands on it ourselves... but this was a bit pointless.
and btw... Haiku really looks old...
the whole interface still is like the old BeOS, and I'm not speaking about the look, more about the whole concept of the thing... times are changing... there's a need for some new idea...

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: confused
by jeanmarc on Tue 5th Sep 2006 15:35 UTC in reply to "RE: confused"
jeanmarc Member since:
2005-07-06

Haiku R1 may look old but it'll be the platform to get started. The achievement have been great so far and the projet start to gain recognition.
Thanks all the devs, the efforts will bring us a brand new fresh desktop OS !

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: confused
by StephenBeDoper on Tue 5th Sep 2006 21:13 UTC in reply to "RE: confused"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

the whole interface still is like the old BeOS, and I'm not speaking about the look, more about the whole concept of the thing... times are changing... there's a need for some new idea...

For those of us who appreciate it, the BeOS UI (both in terms of operation and the aesthetics) is one of the best parts of the OS. I can't imagine why a project to recreate BeOS would want to toss out one of the OS's best attributes, pun not intended.

I realize anecdotal evidence on message boards isn't worth the bandwidth it's carried on... but for what it's worth, every time I've shown BeOS to someone who has the design/graphics knowledge to articulate why they believe something is/isn't aesthetically pleasing, the comments have been positive.

And from a subjective point of view, I prefer the minimal/clean interface of BeOS to the "new" UIs of OS X or XP. As far as I can tell, the main thing that makes a UI look "new" is unnecessary photorealistic icons and transparency effects, excessive embossing/glossiness, gradients everywhere, and dropshadows on every possible UI element. And in my experience, flashy effects end up being more annoying than useful after the "Ooh, new shiny thing" glow wears off. Although, I also think that the NeXT UI and the classic MacOS UI are aesthetically pleasing, which probably makes me a hopeless Luddite by current standards.

Reply Score: 5

RE: confused
by tonywob on Tue 5th Sep 2006 16:05 UTC in reply to "confused"
tonywob Member since:
2005-07-06

I might seem pointless, but it is certainly showing progress ;) , I am definitely looking forward to a useable release.

Reply Score: 4

RE: confused
by Kroc on Tue 5th Sep 2006 16:40 UTC in reply to "confused"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

"It's not an OS until it runs Doom" :3
I think the Teapot has been replaced by Quake III now. (e.g. MorphOS, SkyOS etc)

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: confused
by TQH ! on Wed 6th Sep 2006 08:33 UTC in reply to "RE: confused"
TQH ! Member since:
2006-03-16

Ah, nice to know that Haiku is one then.

http://flickr.com/photos/johndrinkwater/144108950/

Reply Score: 1

Very impressive
by JaredWhite on Tue 5th Sep 2006 16:10 UTC
JaredWhite
Member since:
2005-07-06

Building a new OS virtually from scratch, even when it's a "clone" of another one, is extremely difficult. The fact that Haiku even came this far, through basically volunteer effort, is pretty amazing to me. Frankly, I never expected the project to last this long.

Sure, R1 in the whole scheme of things may seem bland, but as another commenter here said it will provide a solid foundation for R2 and more innovative versions. As a happy Mac OS X user, I don't see myself "switching" to Haiku any time soon, but I certainly will keep a close eye on it. God knows the PC community needs something more forward-looking than Windows or Linux to run with!

Reply Score: 5

progress
by jeanmarc on Tue 5th Sep 2006 16:11 UTC
jeanmarc
Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, i agreed the video is far from being impressive, it seen like a build from months ago..
Haiku is much further, it can run FireFox, Quake3, Wonderbrush and many other BeOS apps.. surely it's unstable but still !
And, in few months (weeks) it'll will get a network stack and USB.

Reply Score: 3

RE:
by Yomama on Tue 5th Sep 2006 16:12 UTC
Yomama
Member since:
2005-07-21

I think it is amazing what the team has done so far. People donated their time and we should recognize that.

I might never run Haiku, but I'm very impressed that the project lasted that long. Good work ....keep it up.

---------------
Coupons and Freebies at http://www.canadaspecials.ca

Reply Score: 1

Nice one once more
by Methe on Tue 5th Sep 2006 16:40 UTC
Methe
Member since:
2006-08-27

Why nobody publishes news about a new page added to slackware's manual? Why nobody comment every commit made in some obscure opensource app? Why OSnews doesn't just publish official news, interviews or articles on Haiku like for any other project?

Reply Score: 1

I'm probably in the minority...
by blixel on Tue 5th Sep 2006 17:32 UTC
blixel
Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm probably in the minority, but I actually like the "old" look. When I see "eye candy", I always think "what a waste of CPU & RAM." Seriously. What's the point of having a computer if you're only desire is to have gee-whiz screensavers, lickable icons, and look-at-me-ain't-I-cool mouse cursors and all of that other resource wasting cruft?

Seems like a pointless use of a computer to me. Buy a computer for the sake of "pimping" it out ... so you can ... stare at your Desktop background ... and ... so you can ... uhh... look at your icons ... so you ... can ... ?? ... uhh ... install another set of bouncy mouse cursors ...

Reply Score: 5

IceCubed Member since:
2005-07-01

If I could, I would vote +5

I completely agree with you.

Reply Score: 5

siebharinn Member since:
2005-07-06

I also agree. I appreciate the simplicity of the interface. That was one of the most appealing things about BeOS to me.

Reply Score: 5

petterhj Member since:
2005-08-19

You're not alone feeling this, but we're probably in the minority yes ;) This is probably *why* I like BeOS, but who knows what the future brings!

Reply Score: 4

umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

Definitely not alone on that one. I absolutely *HATE* "pretty" desktops and "fancy" themes. First thing I do on a Windows XP box is switch to "Classic" theme before I can get anything done.

It is one of the reasons BeOS' simplicity has always aspired to my tastes.

Reply Score: 4

twenex Member since:
2006-04-21

...And another vote in your favour.

Reply Score: 3

Fransexy Member since:
2005-07-29

....And another one, seems that we are not a minority after all ;)

Reply Score: 4

gentlemanfinn Member since:
2006-02-19

Wait, are you saying that you don't like new icons, even if they make your computer experience more intuitive, or mouse icons that gives the user a better knowledge of what is going on in the computer?
What about video thumbnailing? Let's say I have a directory full of videos, and I want to find Taxi Driver, now I remember that when I last opened the movie it had a thumbnail of a yellow taxi at night, now I'll just look for a thumbnail with a yellow taxi, in my experience this is faster then having to look for a file called Taxi Driver.avi.
If this is what you call "eye candy" then I have to disagree, but if you are talking about big round window borders or big shiny icons that make your eyes hurt, I'll have to agree.

------
I only posted to you because I wanted a high score, so please give me a high score ;-)

Reply Score: 1

blixel Member since:
2005-07-06

Wait, are you saying that you don't like new icons, even if they make your computer experience more intuitive...

Nope, I didn't say that at all.

I'm saying I have better uses for my computer than downloading dozens of icon packs, screensavers, desktop wallpapers, splash login screens, sound packs, media player "skins", and so on.

As far as "desktop" wallpaper goes, I don't spend a heck of a lot of time looking at my root window. It's always covered by program windows because I *use* programs. I don't *use* the root window.

The only time I see the root window is when my system first boots into the graphical environment ... which looks like this: http://www.blixel.com/Desktop.jpg

As far as "desktop" icons go, same thing. My root window is always covered by program windows. So I wouldn't see the icons anyway. And it would bug me knowing that there was some program running in the background that was wasting CPU cycles and RAM just to draw icons I'll never see or use.

I think screensavers are a waste of CPU cycles, and in turn, a waste of electricity. When I walk away from my computer, I press a key combination to put my LCD panels into power saving mode. I have no desire to sit at my computer and stare at pipes drawing on the screen. And when I'm not sitting in front of my computer, I'm not there to "enjoy" the pipes drawing on the screen anyway. So why bother with them?

(Some of those really "fancy" screensavers can really suck the juice. Monitor your CPU temperature some time when running a CPU intensive screensaver for about 5 or 10 minutes. Those screensavers should instead be called CPU-heaters.)

Splash logins ... is it really worth the effort to customize a splash login screen? I mean, you have to log out and log back in just to see it. And it only lasts for 1 or 2 seconds. What's the point? Plus, it requires that you use a display manager. I'd rather just boot to a command prompt when my system first comes on. I'll login and type "startx" myself. So I'd have to install a display manager just to get splash logins. Not worth it.

Sound packs. Personally, I can't stand system sounds. My speakers are reserved for my audio file collection.

Media player skins. Computer programs aren't car stereos. So, in my opinion, they shouldn't look like a car stereo... or an alien head, or a jukebox, or any other dumb thing like that.

Reply Score: 1

gentlemanfinn Member since:
2006-02-19

then I'll have to agree with you :-)

Reply Score: 1

transputer_guy Member since:
2005-07-08

Agreed, before BeOS I was 1st a MacOS junky, spent zillions on prettying up MacOS with all sorts of things that should have been built in or should never have been added yet had only marginal improvement on productivity as well as increased crashes.

The switch to W2k was a big increase in blandness and stability too, but too far back to ugly side.

The switch to BeOS pretty much gets it almost right in the middle for pretty enough with lots of Tracker power most OSes don't have. I still miss the MacOS prettyness and some of the BeOS changes from Mac were backwards but those can be fixed eventually.

Reply Score: 1

Add me to the minority
by SteveH on Tue 5th Sep 2006 19:21 UTC
SteveH
Member since:
2006-04-03

I found that pretty interesting overall. Yes it does look slightly ‘old hat’ after three years of OS X but it does bring back some good memories of running BeOS as an alternative to Windows. If Haiku can capture some of those BeOS features that have never been replicated by any other OS it will be great to run it again - even if it needs to be through something like Parallels Desktop.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Add me to the minority
by sogabe on Tue 5th Sep 2006 22:32 UTC in reply to "Add me to the minority"
sogabe Member since:
2006-04-27

> If Haiku can capture those BeOS features that
> have never been replicated by any other OS...

What would those features be?

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Add me to the minority
by Sabon on Tue 5th Sep 2006 23:41 UTC in reply to "RE: Add me to the minority"
Sabon Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, the ability to play 16 movies at a time on the desktop without losing any frames. Awesome. This worked on a Intel 486 single processor computer. I was blown away the first time I saw that. And then I was shown that BeOS instantly changed audio from one movie to the other --instantly-- as soon as you clicked from one movie to another. Again, Windows can't do that with two movies side by side let alone 16 on screen at the same time.

Another? Ok. How about all the contents of files being searchable in moments (not seconds). The closest thing to this is Spotlight in Mac OS X but it just isn't the same (or nearly as fast).

Zero latency audio (from multiple inputs) was unique to BeOS back on 486s. Apple didn't catch up until GarageBand. Windows still doesn't do this. If you think Windows does this you just don't have a clue. We are talking ZERO latency with MULTIPLE instruments plugged into the computer. Windows still doesn't come close to doing this. That's why pros use Macs, among other reasons.

More? Everything in BeOS was fast. Screaming fast. Mach 6 fast when Windows was creeping along like a Model T Ford at 12 mph. That kind of fast and responsive. Windows is still incredibly slow feeling. Like Molasses in winter going uphill will speed-bumps slow.

Congratulation Haiku group. For some people it might not look like much but "we" know how much work this has taken. LOTS.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Add me to the minority
by umccullough on Wed 6th Sep 2006 00:07 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Add me to the minority"
umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

I think you're mistaking "486s" with "Pentiums"...

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Add me to the minority
by sogabe on Wed 6th Sep 2006 03:20 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Add me to the minority"
sogabe Member since:
2006-04-27

> Well, the ability to play 16 movies at a time on the
> desktop without losing any frames. Awesome.

Which is of dubious usefulness. :-)

> Another? Ok. How about all the contents of files being searchable
> in moments (not seconds).

I think this is not true. The BeOS file system can query indexed attributes (and it is quite good at that), but it cannot search the actual content of files; two different things. I think Spotlight and Beagle can search file content.

> Zero latency audio (from multiple inputs) was unique to BeOS
> back on 486s. Apple didn't catch up until GarageBand.

So, Apple did catch up on this one, didn't it?

> More? Everything in BeOS was fast. Screaming fast.

Very true, and impressive indeed. But this alone will not make BeOS (or Haiku or ZETA) better in the eyes of computer users.

The areas that BeOS has fallen behind relative to other operating systems far outweigh the few edges that it may still hold. Haiku has a lot of catch up to do.

IMHO, of course. :-)

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Add me to the minority
by jeanmarc on Wed 6th Sep 2006 05:58 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Add me to the minority"
jeanmarc Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, the ability to play 16 movies at a time
>Which is of dubious usefulness
It's really useful for Pr0n ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Add me to the minority
by renox on Wed 6th Sep 2006 08:56 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Add me to the minority"
renox Member since:
2005-07-06

>> More? Everything in BeOS was fast. Screaming fast.
> Very true, and impressive indeed. But this alone will not make BeOS (or Haiku or ZETA) better in the eyes of computer users.

True, while I was impressed by BeOS speed or more precisely by the application responsiveness, I dumped it quite soon because it was lacking the applications I wanted.

Now if Haiku can keep BeOS responsiveness *and* has enough apps, then its responsiveness will be a huge advantage: when I dumped BeOS, it was (and is still) painful using Windows or Linux: so slow..

What I especially hope is that Haiku could have a tabbed browser which stay responsive: even Opera sometimes 'freeze' because one tab is working which is stupid: if one tab is doing heavy work or waiting only this tab should freeze, not the whole GUI..

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Add me to the minority
by SteveH on Wed 6th Sep 2006 09:35 UTC in reply to "RE: Add me to the minority"
SteveH Member since:
2006-04-03

How about a database-like file system supporting custom file attributes?

Reply Score: 1

fyysik Member since:
2006-02-19

Yes, yellow tabs may look old-fashined, but most of the look can be changed using alternative Tracker:
http://hanasoft.ru/images/ss/Haiku_NaviTracker0.65.png

Reply Score: 4

I'm probably in the minority...
by Valhalla on Tue 5th Sep 2006 20:37 UTC
Valhalla
Member since:
2006-01-24

as for the video, for existing Beos users (such as myself) it gives a good look at how much of the Beos gui functionality that has been implemented in Haiku.

for people new to Beos/Haiku, I think it gives a quick glance at how the Beos/Haiku desktop works.

personally I'm more interested in seeing how the desktop operates rather than seeing q3 running in yet another os, same goes for the opengl teapot. opengl is great, but it is one of those things that I can actually do without, not that I'll have to though, thanks mainly due to the hard work of Rudolf.

my main reasons for loving Beos was always the responsiveness, the uniformly designed and functional gui, and (as a programmer) the well designed api.

given this, I'm truly happy that Haiku has opted not to change the way it operates or it's basic design compared to Beos, and I hope that will not change with r2 either.
that is not to say that things shouldn't be enhanced, the api can/will be be extended, the graphics can be polished, desktop functionality can be added etc.. but at the end of the day, I wish Haiku to keep the core look and feel of Beos.

Reply Score: 4

Actually...
by Anonymous Penguin on Tue 5th Sep 2006 21:24 UTC
Anonymous Penguin
Member since:
2005-07-06

Actually for a small project I found it quite nice, with plenty of features. And open source and free on top of it.
Much better than similarly sized projects which are closed source and you must pay to get them.

Reply Score: 1

looks great
by wonea on Tue 5th Sep 2006 23:16 UTC
wonea
Member since:
2005-10-28

BeOS still looks fine to me. Yes it maybe very 90s. But I like very much like the MUI (amiga) look. There's probably parallels to draw. Anyway, Haiku looks great. Watching the svn for changes. Looking forward to release.

Reply Score: 1

Look and UI not the same thing
by Nicholas Blachford on Tue 5th Sep 2006 23:35 UTC
Nicholas Blachford
Member since:
2005-07-06

The BeOS UI is fantastic, still one of the best around. It's a very good of the less is more philosophy in action.

I'd like to see a better "skin" though. As for "eye candy" while there's no doubt some is superfluous some of it is very useful and enhances the experience, I'm all for it if it does that.

Reply Score: 1

Ow!!!
by michaelvoliveira on Wed 6th Sep 2006 01:11 UTC
michaelvoliveira
Member since:
2006-03-22

OhhH!!! NaviTracker on Haiku? Excellent!

If I Could Fly (Helloween) being played in Haiku?
http://hanasoft.ru/images/ss/Haiku-12jun2006-MediaKit.jpg

Excellent job Haiku-os.org guys ;)

Michael Vinícius de Oliveira

Reply Score: 1

RE: Ow!!!
by britbrian on Wed 6th Sep 2006 03:05 UTC in reply to "Ow!!!"
britbrian Member since:
2005-07-06

NaviTracker is new to me and it looks great
http://3deyes.by.ru/pages/navitracker.htm
http://joomla.iscomputeron.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=vi...

I allways wanted a more feature rich navigational browser like this. Seeker was OK in the meantime.

Reply Score: 1

Haiku/BeOS it's all about the feel.
by stormloss on Wed 6th Sep 2006 05:45 UTC
stormloss
Member since:
2005-08-03

For people who use Linux/Windows, Haiku/BeOS is more about the feel.

The closest it feels like is Mac8+ and E17(Unix/Linux)
desktop, but that does not do it justice.

Sure Haiku/Beos can be pimped out with shiny icons, sound and newer technology add-ons. But that is not the point.

Haiku is a solid FONDATION for things to come!
much like VMS based NT4 was to Vista.
And Darwin is to OSX.

Out of the box Haiku/BeOS will have the main core technology that OSX and Vista take for granted on older
based software technology.
(fast searching via the file system, multi-cpu multi-threaded and so on).

Haiku running on it's own with a GUI video blew me away! The foundation is here.
That makes me very Happy, great work Haiku team.

Reply Score: 1