Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 11th Dec 2006 19:49 UTC, submitted by amerigo5
Java This morning Sun officially released Java 6 for download after over two years of development. The Java 6 development cycle has been the most open of any Java release with weekly builds available to the public and extensive collaboration between Sun and over 330 external developers. Sun has worked with over 160 companies to ensure backwards compatibility, stability and optimum performance of applications running on the JVM.
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Well Done
by osjohn on Mon 11th Dec 2006 20:13 UTC
osjohn
Member since:
2006-07-12

Congratulations to all the Java team and developers. With their new licensing and community support I hope Java can continue to prosper.

Edited 2006-12-11 20:15

Reply Score: 5

Great Release!
by kap1 on Mon 11th Dec 2006 20:27 UTC
kap1
Member since:
2006-05-12

have to say this is probably one of the best releases ever, brings amazing speeds boosts.

Reply Score: 3

My early impression
by Shaman on Mon 11th Dec 2006 20:32 UTC
Shaman
Member since:
2005-11-15

From my first tests of the full version (I tried out the beta but decided not to base any conclusions on it, though they were good), it has sped up my Java applications such as PCGen, JAlbum and Azureus by a considerable margin. PCGen in particular feels easily twice as fast.

When I shuffle off home again, I'm going to try out the world's biggest, nastiest, most brutal Java application (in my experience, anyway) called Dunjinni which catalogs and loads a good amount of over 3,000 images before popping up, and bogs my AMD-64 machine to the max until it's good and ready to give me an interface. Bad programming meets Java latency... I'm hoping this app will really show the mettle of Java's new standard performance or break miserably and show me that Dunjinni and I are going to part ways for good. Usually it takes as long as 5 minutes to give me a user interface, if you can imagine.

Kudos to Sun for improving their language flagship and I look forward to the GPL version being tightly integrated into my operatings systems in the future.

Edited 2006-12-11 20:34

Reply Score: 5

what can I say?
by evilmegaman on Mon 11th Dec 2006 20:34 UTC
evilmegaman
Member since:
2005-09-20

besides w00t that is. I can't wait to give this a shot. I wonder if I will notice any speed boosts...

Reply Score: 1

Looking great!
by ormandj on Mon 11th Dec 2006 20:44 UTC
ormandj
Member since:
2005-10-09

Hopefully we'll start to see more cross-platform applications as Java catches on. The client-side "slowness" has been a problem for a lot of people (I've never heard so many complaints) but Java 6 address a lot of this. With the license change coming down the road, it's not unlikely that we'll start seeing applications pop up on unix/linux/windows/osx all at the same time. Can't wait! ;)

Reply Score: 4

No 64-bit firefox plugin
by bryanw on Mon 11th Dec 2006 20:45 UTC
bryanw
Member since:
2006-12-11

According to:
http://java.sun.com/javase/6/webnotes/install/system-configurations...

There still is no 64-bit firefox plugin on any platform. There is support for 64-bit IE.

Reply Score: 4

RE: No 64-bit firefox plugin
by Shaman on Mon 11th Dec 2006 20:51 UTC in reply to "No 64-bit firefox plugin"
Shaman Member since:
2005-11-15

There still is no 64-bit firefox plugin on any platform. There is support for 64-bit IE.

That's why the GPL release of Java is a long-awaited thing. I suspect you will see more direct Java hooks in Firefox and other worthwhile browsers as a result, and no doubt there will be a release of a 64 bit plugin directly compiled on your operating system of choice if you are using *nix or Macintosh.

In a few months, complaints like yours will likely be no more.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: No 64-bit firefox plugin
by osjohn on Mon 11th Dec 2006 21:13 UTC in reply to "RE: No 64-bit firefox plugin"
osjohn Member since:
2006-07-12

I hope you're right. It's a shame, though, that it will be left to the community to do this.
You'd think that at this moment more than ever that Sun would support the 64-bit version of a browser from the very community it's just opened its source code to!

Edited 2006-12-11 21:16

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: No 64-bit firefox plugin
by edwdig on Tue 12th Dec 2006 03:56 UTC in reply to "RE: No 64-bit firefox plugin"
edwdig Member since:
2005-08-22

That's why the GPL release of Java is a long-awaited thing. I suspect you will see more direct Java hooks in Firefox and other worthwhile browsers as a result, and no doubt there will be a release of a 64 bit plugin directly compiled on your operating system of choice if you are using *nix or Macintosh.

Of course, the tradeoff to this is there will be 3 different open source plugins, each of which has a different set of bugs/limitations.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: No 64-bit firefox plugin
by smitty on Tue 12th Dec 2006 04:56 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: No 64-bit firefox plugin"
smitty Member since:
2005-10-13

I'd take 3 different plugins each with limitations over 0 different plugins that don't exist any day...

I'm not so sure I agree, though. It should be simple enough to do a straight 64-bit port of the official Sun plugin, and everyone would know that any others that are created might not be as well supported.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: No 64-bit firefox plugin
by someone on Tue 12th Dec 2006 06:50 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: No 64-bit firefox plugin"
someone Member since:
2006-01-12

Of course, the tradeoff to this is there will be 3 different open source plugins, each of which has a different set of bugs/limitations.

Of which only one is actually known as "the Java". The other two are mainly used for research or by power users.

Reply Score: 2

Big fan
by situation on Mon 11th Dec 2006 20:48 UTC
situation
Member since:
2006-01-10

I'm a big fan of new releases of anything, and it's nice to see Java is _still_ moving ahead and staying current (and in the news).

Browser: Links (0.99; Linux 2.6.13 i686; 144x56)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Big fan
by grfgguvf on Mon 11th Dec 2006 21:34 UTC in reply to "Big fan"
grfgguvf Member since:
2006-09-25

Hehe.. ^_^

No offense but Why are you running age-old versions of your browser and kernel then? :-)

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Big fan
by situation on Mon 11th Dec 2006 22:51 UTC in reply to "RE: Big fan"
situation Member since:
2006-01-10

Hehe, it's a work computer. I have 2.6.18 and Slackware 11.0 on my home machine, honest!
And as for the links version, I'm not a big fan of the >1.0 releases (they've crashed on me...how does a text browser even crash?!).

Reply Score: 2

Sincerity
by diegocg on Mon 11th Dec 2006 20:59 UTC
diegocg
Member since:
2005-07-08

...why I have the feel that if Sun hadn't released Java as GPL I'd be thinking "Oh no, another version of that bloated crap" but now I think "Wow, a even faster version of java, I need to buy that java book"?


Jokes aside, the BIGGEST improvement in this release is the GPLization. Thanks sun ;)

Edited 2006-12-11 21:00

Reply Score: 5

RE: Sincerity
by Gooberslot on Tue 12th Dec 2006 04:26 UTC in reply to "Sincerity"
Gooberslot Member since:
2006-08-02

I know you say you're joking but I'm sure there are a lot of people who actually do think that way. How does being GPL affect the quality of the program in any way?

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Sincerity
by Daniel Borgmann on Tue 12th Dec 2006 05:42 UTC in reply to "RE: Sincerity"
Daniel Borgmann Member since:
2005-07-08

For starters, I can expect perfect and simple integration into my Linux distribution of choice. The rest is simply opinion based on experience. Take Netscape or Blender for example, both have gotten a lot more attractive after they became free software.

I noticed that I tend to judge software as much by its potential as on its current state, so a project becoming GPL makes a lot of difference in my perception of it. Suddenly all its strengths look more convincing and all its weaknesses don't look so bad after all. ;-)

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Sincerity
by Gooberslot on Tue 12th Dec 2006 07:01 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Sincerity"
Gooberslot Member since:
2006-08-02

In other words, ideology gets in the way of objective thought.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Sincerity
by Lobotomik on Tue 12th Dec 2006 07:52 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Sincerity"
Lobotomik Member since:
2006-01-03

Of course it does, and very rightly so. Not so much with science (and yet...), but with technology, we should never let it be otherwise.

And in this case, ideology will bring tangible technical advantages for Java:

The legal possibility to distribute it freely will allow widespread deployment. A pervasive Java will make it practical to deliver programs of any size and complexity written in this language, which is now appropriate only for the largest apps and enterprise deployments.

The legal possibility to intervene in the development of Java will ease the efforts of groups other than Sun to add or model features in Java that they need to their ends. You'll see it getting very well integrated in Gnome and KDE, as well as in who knows how many apps.

The legal possibility to analize the code unbound will allow many bugs to be squashed and many optimizations to be ironed in. You'll se Java become better faster, as happens with Gnome, KDE and the Linux kernel.

And so on. So yes, even if Java 7 was just a slightly cut-down, GPL version of Java 6 it would be a vast ideological and technical advancement. And sure it will be much more than that.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Sincerity
by someone on Tue 12th Dec 2006 06:45 UTC in reply to "Sincerity"
someone Member since:
2006-01-12

...why I have the feel that if Sun hadn't released Java as GPL I'd be thinking "Oh no, another version of that bloated crap" but now I think "Wow, a even faster version of java, I need to buy that java book"?

I agree that Java is slow and bloated is more of an image problem than a real problem with regard to the current Java platform.

However, it is important to note that the Hotspot Client VM received some important makeovers in Java 6. (See this: http://weblogs.java.net/blog/opinali/archive/2005/11/mustangs_hotsp...) Seeing how this is the VM encountered by most users, I guess the faster designation does have some grain of truth in it.

I really hope Sun would implement JIT caching in Java 7. It would enable the client VM to make use of some the more aggressive optimization techniques server VM users have been enjoying for years without sacrificing startup performance.

Edited 2006-12-12 07:00

Reply Score: 2

Java 6 under the GPL?
by Sodki on Mon 11th Dec 2006 21:09 UTC
Sodki
Member since:
2005-11-10

Can Java 6 be downloaded under the GPL? Where?

Reply Score: 2

RE: Java 6 under the GPL?
by tmack on Mon 11th Dec 2006 21:33 UTC in reply to "Java 6 under the GPL?"
tmack Member since:
2006-04-11

Java 6 proper isn't under the GPL. Java wasn't GPL'd until a month or so before the release, so the first *official* stable release of GPL Java will be Java 7.

If you want to start hacking today, you can go here and download the source to the JVM, JIT and source compiler: https://openjdk.dev.java.net/

The class libraries are currently undergoing GPLification and should be available the first quarter of 2007.

Edited 2006-12-11 21:36

Reply Score: 5

v patent madness
by unapersson on Mon 11th Dec 2006 21:42 UTC
Simply great
by miketech on Mon 11th Dec 2006 22:15 UTC
miketech
Member since:
2005-07-21

This seems to be a really great release! Thanks to Sun and all volunteer for all the effort!

The webservice improvements and also the new functionality on the desktop looks good. Can't await the moment the whole class library is gpl and java is distributed by all the linux distributions per default.

Greetings

Mike

Reply Score: 2

OSX
by sigzero on Mon 11th Dec 2006 22:18 UTC
sigzero
Member since:
2006-01-03

Well I wonder how long it will take Apple to catch up this time?

Reply Score: 2

RE: OSX
by Myrd on Mon 11th Dec 2006 22:22 UTC
Myrd
Member since:
2006-01-05

Why wonder? If they follow the same strategy, Java 1.6 will be released on Leopard, and Tiger will be stuck with Java 1.5. Just like Panther is currently stuck with Java 1.4.

Reply Score: 2

HotJava maybe
by transputer_guy on Mon 11th Dec 2006 23:13 UTC
transputer_guy
Member since:
2005-07-08

Perhaps its time to revisit a Java based browser again.

I recall years ago that HotJava showed us exactly why not to use Java for responsive apps, but we have much faster hardware and now Java 6.

Now when do we get a BeOS Java, I know it stalled on a BeOS problem.

Reply Score: 1

Yes!
by betson on Mon 11th Dec 2006 23:26 UTC
betson
Member since:
2005-12-17

This is excellent news!

I'm primarily a .NET developer, but as a right-tool right-job kind of guy I really appreciate that Sun is plunging forward and improving Java as much as they can. That really shows to me that Sun has been re-energized recently, and the Swing improvements scream that they're ready to make another grab for the desktop again.

Who knows, in the future I might have to bust out Eclipse and start coding in Java again!

Reply Score: 3

the guilotine comes down
by jango on Mon 11th Dec 2006 23:36 UTC
jango
Member since:
2006-11-22

feelin the sweat run down your cheek, your breath quickens, your mouth dries

thats what it must feel to mono and .NET
a new beast is unleashed, let foss java run free

Reply Score: 1

RE: the guilotine comes down
by tmack on Mon 11th Dec 2006 23:54 UTC in reply to "the guilotine comes down"
tmack Member since:
2006-04-11

I don't know about that.

Most .NET developers are former VB6 "programmers". The Java VB implementation isn't along that far yet. ;)

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: the guilotine comes down
by jango on Tue 12th Dec 2006 05:10 UTC in reply to "RE: the guilotine comes down"
jango Member since:
2006-11-22

i understand where your coming from,

i find vb quite a and c# , easy but cumbersome and over controlling

i find java,despite some hem less than informed criticisms of it, to be quite good,

i do however beleive, say for example, instead of developing a linux app on mono, why not use java

if we have learned anything from linux, it is that when a corporation and volunteers can work together their product will rock the world. eg linux kernel

java will be in a similar position, SUN will provide a spark, and the foss community will add fuel to the fire

Reply Score: 3

Kaffe
by eivind on Mon 11th Dec 2006 23:59 UTC
eivind
Member since:
2005-11-09

What happens to the Kaffe project when 1.7 proper is released, then?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Kaffe
by ormandj on Tue 12th Dec 2006 00:09 UTC in reply to "Kaffe"
ormandj Member since:
2005-10-09

Likely it will die (any positive improvements might be merged into Sun's GPL'd java). Either that or a few stubborn rage-against-the-machine-listening devs will keep hacking away at it. Doubtful, though. Of course, this is pure conjecture, nobody knows until the GPL-ization occurs of the class libs.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Kaffe
by robilad on Tue 12th Dec 2006 02:36 UTC in reply to "Kaffe"
robilad Member since:
2006-01-02
Antialiasing
by situation on Tue 12th Dec 2006 01:27 UTC
situation
Member since:
2006-01-10

Looks like text antialising is enabled by default on Linux (not sure if this was always the case on some distros). It's a step in the right direction for making Swing look more modern. Throw on a good theme and before you know it the app looks and handles as well (or better) than a native QT / GTK app.

Browser: Links (2.1pre23; Linux 2.6.18 i686; 80x25)

Reply Score: 2

"6"
by Cloudy on Tue 12th Dec 2006 03:14 UTC
Cloudy
Member since:
2006-02-15

Still cracks me up that Sun dropped the "1." from their version numbering scheme.

Reply Score: 2

RE: "6"
by edwdig on Tue 12th Dec 2006 04:03 UTC in reply to ""6""
edwdig Member since:
2005-08-22

Still cracks me up that Sun dropped the "1." from their version numbering scheme.

They did the same thing with Solaris. Solaris 10 is really Solaris 2.10. Which in turn is SunOS 5.10.

At some point Emacs dropped the leading 1 in their version numbers. When they did it though, they did it pretty much completely. I don't know if the leading 1 is visible anywhere in the code, but it isn't in the UI.

Reply Score: 1

I don't believe this
by unoengborg on Tue 12th Dec 2006 06:01 UTC
unoengborg
Member since:
2005-07-06

For about seven years it have been impossible to use all keys on European keyboards with java. What keys that fails varies from country to country. On my Swedish keyboard it have been the tilde character that could not be typed.

There have been some exeptions, JDK1.5beta2 worked, and so did pre release builds of JDK1.6.

This time though, I'm not sure I can blame Sun, as the new Java seam to work on Fedora Core 4, but not on FC6.
At first I guessed it is a problem with the X server (xorg-x11-server-Xorg-1.1.1-47.2.fc6), but it turned out that tilde worked just fine if I opened an ssh session to my FC4 box and displayed it on my FC6 Xorg server. Anybody that have any ideas?

Still, it is almost like there was a conspiracy against java on the Linux desktop. This is really a pity as the new java 6 seam to be really snappy, and comes with many desktop related features that would have been really nice for people that wanted to create cross platform desktop applicatin.

Reply Score: 3

yay!
by arielb on Tue 12th Dec 2006 07:47 UTC
arielb
Member since:
2006-11-15

Now tetris games will run faster. Stop it and think. Shhhh I actually downloaded this. Why would anyone else on the web get the new java?

Reply Score: 1

Swing Bug Under compiz
by iiifrank on Tue 12th Dec 2006 20:00 UTC
iiifrank
Member since:
2006-05-18

Unfortunately, this release does not include the fix for the huge Swing bug when running under compiz/beryl/glx. Here's a link to the Sun bug id:

http://bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6429775

If this is important to you, sign up and place a vote for this bug.

Reply Score: 1

using it on Fedora 6
by buff on Wed 13th Dec 2006 00:18 UTC
buff
Member since:
2005-11-12

I downloaded it last night and used it with Limewire. The UI appeared to render faster. I keep waiting for Java to come bundled with an API to call GTK widgets. I know there are third party options for this but I am surprised the UI is still stuck in the pre-Linux Desktop era with Swing components. Java is definitely fast enough to be used for Desktop applications but one unappealing factor is large applications take a long time to load at startup since they are busy creating oodles of objects.

Reply Score: 1

RE: using it on Fedora 6
by cendrizzi on Wed 13th Dec 2006 06:28 UTC in reply to "using it on Fedora 6"
cendrizzi Member since:
2005-07-08

Doesn't 6 now use GTK to render the buttons etc? Look here: http://ensode.net/java_swing_mustang_screenshots_gtk.html

You can even compare it to java 5. Clearly it looks much, much better. Perhaps Limewire doesn't take advantage of these integrations??

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: using it on Fedora 6
by buff on Wed 13th Dec 2006 22:29 UTC in reply to "RE: using it on Fedora 6"
buff Member since:
2005-11-12

Okay, I wrote a quick little Swing application with a button and a combobox. I compiled it and ran it on Java 6 and looked just like a real GTK app. Wow, it really works. I am impressed. I can see why people are excited about Java 6. Sun did a good job on this release.

Reply Score: 1