Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 15th Dec 2006 15:08 UTC, submitted by elsewhere
Google Google has added another piece of search software to its arsenal, with the launch of Google Patent Search. The patent search site, launched as a beta on Wednesday night, is designed to sift through the approximately 7 million U.S. patents by a variety of parameters including filing date, issue date, patent number and inventor.
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Search for google
by mcduck on Fri 15th Dec 2006 15:25 UTC
mcduck
Member since:
2005-11-23

Soon we are going to need a search engine just to search though all the services google offers :-)

Reply Score: 3

splendid
by tspears on Fri 15th Dec 2006 15:44 UTC
tspears
Member since:
2006-05-22

maybe now we can find out which MS patents linux supposedly violates ;-)

Reply Score: 1

Printing?
by LobalSurgery on Fri 15th Dec 2006 16:44 UTC
LobalSurgery
Member since:
2006-09-07

There doesn't seem to be an easy way to print patents from the Google site. Each page is stored as a PNG image, so they can be printed individually, but this isn't very convenient for large patents. It would be nice to be able to save the entire document in PDF format.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Printing?
by Wes Felter on Fri 15th Dec 2006 20:37 UTC in reply to "Printing?"
Wes Felter Member since:
2005-11-15

I use http://www.pat2pdf.org/ for patents; it's too bad Google didn't integrate this feature.

Reply Score: 2

reflex
by mjones on Fri 15th Dec 2006 18:10 UTC
mjones
Member since:
2006-06-14

Has googled patented this engine?

Reply Score: 1

RE: reflex
by sbergman27 on Fri 15th Dec 2006 19:00 UTC in reply to "reflex"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

"""Has google patented this engine?"""

Imagine a beowulf...

Sorry. ;-) Really. Sorry.

Reply Score: 2

JoeBuck
Member since:
2006-01-11

Here's the problem: under US patent law, you are liable for triple damages for knowingly infringing a patent (assuming that the patent stands up in court and you're found to be infringing). You are better off, if you do software development, never to search for patents.

Reply Score: 3

prince_seth Member since:
2006-11-22

The ironic thing about your post will be that now they will say there is no excuse for violating a patent, being that now all it requires is a simple google search; ESPECIALLY for software developers. I mean we are tech savvy and all ;)

Reply Score: 1

rjamorim Member since:
2005-12-05

How can a software developer prove in court he never looked at the patent being infriged at Google patent search, or the USPTO site for that matter?

Reply Score: 1

sigh.
by ahmetaa on Fri 15th Dec 2006 18:30 UTC
ahmetaa
Member since:
2005-07-06
RE: sigh.
by DrillSgt on Fri 15th Dec 2006 18:35 UTC in reply to "sigh."
DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

"read and cry:

" rel="nofollow">http://www.google.com/patents?vid=USPAT7028023&id=Szh4AAAAEBAJ&..."...

That can't be right. According to some of the items there, Microsoft has a patent on 'Symbolic links'. ln -s anyone? That has been around since before Microsoft was even a gleam or the slightest thought in Bill's eye.

Reply Score: 2

RE: sigh.
by AlexandreAM on Fri 15th Dec 2006 19:58 UTC in reply to "sigh."
AlexandreAM Member since:
2006-02-06

Gee, I heard the US Patents Office was broke but this... this is unbelievable.

Is there any possibility I can go there and try to patent "Breathing air" ?

... Just can't see how is it even possible, if it is not by corruption, that something like a linked list could be patented. I just can't believe this is all about incompetence.

Thank god I'm no american.

Reply Score: 2

This brings up a new question..
by DrillSgt on Fri 15th Dec 2006 19:14 UTC
DrillSgt
Member since:
2005-12-02

From looking through all of these, it becomes very interesting indeed. It makes me wonder if there are any computer systems and operating systems in use today that are NOT patent encumbered in some manner?

Reply Score: 2

RE: This brings up a new question..
by Brendan on Sat 16th Dec 2006 01:01 UTC in reply to "This brings up a new question.."
Brendan Member since:
2005-11-16

It makes me wonder if there are any computer systems and operating systems in use today that are NOT patent encumbered in some manner?

Hehe - there's probably very little software that doesn't infringe on some sort of obvious and "non-novel" patent, or infringe on a patent with prior art.

In contrast, there's also (hopefully) very little software that infringes on patent/s that would actually stand up in court.

IMHO it's about cost cutting - it'd cost a lot for the patent office to properly determine which patents should and shouldn't be granted, so they grant patents that shouldn't be granted and let the courts figure it out later.

The main problem with this is nuisance court cases, where company A attempts to send company B into bankrupcy (and/or damage company B's reputation) using messy and prelonged court cases that company A knows they shouldn't win before they start.

Reply Score: 1

archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

Note that all the patents in which he's credited as an inventor were registered by Transmeta while he worked at that company. None of these seem to apply to Linux, nor do they appear to be strictly software patents.

Reply Score: 2

RE: sigh.
by tsuraan on Sat 16th Dec 2006 01:20 UTC
tsuraan
Member since:
2006-01-16
RE[2]: sigh.
by ahmetaa on Sat 16th Dec 2006 01:41 UTC in reply to "RE: sigh."
ahmetaa Member since:
2005-07-06
RE[2]: sigh.
by DrillSgt on Sat 16th Dec 2006 01:56 UTC in reply to "RE: sigh."
DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

roflmao.

How the hell did someone patent the age old cat toy?? That..is just so wrong..in so many ways. Does that mean, to play with a pet, I have to pay a fee?? ;)

Reply Score: 2

Patent Law Briefing
by elsewhere on Sat 16th Dec 2006 06:15 UTC
elsewhere
Member since:
2005-07-13

Just as a point of interest, in my googling on patent law issues, I came across this paper: http://www.law.northwestern.edu/colloquium/law_economics/lichtman.p...

Sorry it's a .pdf, and not a short one, but for those really interested in the intricacies of US patent law and the implications from patent trolls etc. I think it's worth a read.

Reply Score: 3

funny
by mmu_man on Sat 16th Dec 2006 09:52 UTC
mmu_man
Member since:
2006-09-30

I thought "hey, google should do that" the other day... I should patent my other ideas right away ;)

Reply Score: 1

can we
by mmu_man on Sat 16th Dec 2006 09:53 UTC
mmu_man
Member since:
2006-09-30

search by stupidity level ?
(10 being the "double click" one)

Reply Score: 1

wannabe geek
Member since:
2006-09-27

There's a powerful strategy to fight software patents: defensive publication (prior art).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defensive_publication

http://osapa.org/information.html

If you are a FOSS supporter, and you've just had a great idea, or you've seen it posted in a mailing list, the best thing you can do is let the world know about it as soon as possible, before big corporations get a patent for this idea, and no-one else (including you) can use it. The patent system will hopefully fall to pieces in the near future, but you never know, better safe than sorry. Applying for a patent and then making it open is expensive. Defensive publication is free.

Reply Score: 1