Linked by Jeff Boes on Wed 21st Feb 2007 04:32 UTC
Features, Office The Book of JavaScript (2nd edition) by "thau!" (Dave Thau, according to the book's companion website) is a new and comprehensive introduction to the JavaScript language presented in an entertaining, practical format. I was provided a review copy by the publisher, No Starch Press. I have significant practical experience with JavaScript, so I do not consider myself in the target audience for this book; however, I still found much of it useful so it will remain as a valuable reference on my bookshelf.
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advertising on osnews :-/
by benja on Wed 21st Feb 2007 12:37 UTC
benja
Member since:
2006-07-14

Well, I'm not reading osnews to see this kind of advertising. This really not related to the future of computing...
I wouldn't mind if this book would be about advanced and less know features of javascript like prototyping/JS2 but this is clearly not the case.
I guess anyone who would want to learn javascript is able to browse amazon and read reviews over there if he whishes.

Reply Score: 1

v RE: advertising on osnews :-/
by JMcCarthy on Wed 21st Feb 2007 12:54 UTC in reply to "advertising on osnews :-/"
RE: advertising on osnews :-/
by Adam S on Wed 21st Feb 2007 13:29 UTC in reply to "advertising on osnews :-/"
Adam S Member since:
2005-04-01

How is a book review advertising?

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: advertising on osnews :-/
by fretinator on Wed 21st Feb 2007 14:41 UTC in reply to "RE: advertising on osnews :-/"
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

I think this is a perfect site for book reviews, especially ones contributed by users. I hope to see more.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: advertising on osnews :-/
by Joe User on Wed 21st Feb 2007 15:53 UTC in reply to "RE: advertising on osnews :-/"
Joe User Member since:
2005-06-29

> How is a book review advertising?

Because in the URL there is "osnews" maybe to get commissions on sales, but this is ok, I'm just assuming here.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: advertising on osnews :-/
by Adam S on Wed 21st Feb 2007 15:59 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: advertising on osnews :-/"
Adam S Member since:
2005-04-01

> How is a book review advertising?


We post reviews of commercial Operating Systems.
We post reviews of commercial applications.
We post reviews of peripherals, often provided by third party sites with whom we have a relationship.
We post reviews of handhelds and phones.

These things all cost money, so do books. By this silly logic, all articles about Windows and OS X are advertisements. Seriously, people.

Reply Score: 1

Ford Prefect Member since:
2006-01-16

Well, osnews gets money from Amazon for every sale done after clicking the link from osnews.

So it's a little bit dishonest to compare this with reviews about OSes etc.

Anyway I believe in that the reviewer was trying to be objective and doesn't has this profit in mind, from which he presumably doesn't see anything.

Reply Score: 5

RE[4]: advertising on osnews :-/
by benja on Wed 21st Feb 2007 16:33 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: advertising on osnews :-/"
benja Member since:
2006-07-14

Well I wasn't aware that `the last great book about you favourite programming language' was part of the editorial line. Thank you for the clarification.

> We post reviews of commercial Operating Systems.
> We post reviews of commercial applications.
> We post reviews of peripherals, often provided
> by third party sites with whom we have a relationship.
> We post reviews of handhelds and phones.

And I really thank you for giving this insight on technology but I can't remember having read such a review with a direct link to buy the feature.

Edited 2007-02-21 16:34

Reply Score: 1

Thau's JavaScript Tutorial
by B12 Simon on Wed 21st Feb 2007 14:08 UTC
B12 Simon
Member since:
2006-11-08

Many years ago I learned very basics of JavaScript programming from Thau's JavaScript tutorial on Wired's WebMonkey site (it's probably still there). He's very good at taking to the novice user through new concepts and I still feel grateful for the start his tutorial gave me. If this book's half as good, it'll be a great resource for the newbie!

For the more advanced user, it's hard to beat O'Reilly's "JavaScript: The Definitive Guide" which is sat on the desk next to me right now.

Edited 2007-02-21 14:14

Reply Score: 3

fretinator
Member since:
2005-07-06

"So, you're a Java programmer. Good, our web team needs a lot of javascript..."

That statement always makes me want to scream and run out of the room. I really wish Netscape had called it webscript, or browserscript, or something like that.

Am I alone in this feeling?

Reply Score: 5

Sphinx Member since:
2005-07-09

Hey enrages me. I feel exactly the same way about the 'C' shell too.

Reply Score: 2

fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

I think the bottom line is that the people involved in hiring programmers often have so little knowledge about the subject.

[Warning, begin off-topic rant]
Where I live, .NET is the big thing. I always get these questions about whether I am a C# developer or a VB.NET developer. I try to explain to them that in the .NET world the two are almost the same. You are coding the exact same API, and that I wouldn't trust a programmer who couldn't translate code between the two. When I say this, all I see are glazed eyes. To the people who do the hiring, they are as different as VB6 and Visual C++. I finally just gave up trying to explain it, and just made sure I had equal experience with both.

I mean, can it really be that hard to change:

Dim frmNew as Form
frmNew = new Form()
frmNew.text = "My Form"

To:

Form frmNew;
frmNew = new Form();
frmNew.text = "My Form";

Wow, what a magical transformation!

Granted, there are some subtle differences - keyword differences (shared vs static), initialization differences, etc, but they are trivial compared to the old days of Visual C++ vs. VB6. In fact, I think the differences are more mindset than anything - geek snobs vs. code cowboys (I'll let you decide which is which ;} )

[End off-topic rant]

Reply Score: 2

Savior Member since:
2006-09-02

So true. Ironically, it was originally meant to be "livescript", but later changed to javascript, because it was released at the same time as the java-enabled Netscape. Apparently, they were confused about it themselves ;)

Reply Score: 2

Joe User Member since:
2005-06-29

This is so true... I hear it all the time, people saying their site is done in Java, and the extension is .php, or programers who say they know Java, and then when you talk about JSP, netbeans, servlets, they don't know what you're talking about, then you say they are probably talking about Javascript, and they say "Yes, Javascript, or Java, same thing, every site uses Java these days". Too sad.

Reply Score: 2

Jon Dough Member since:
2005-11-30

Well, Under ECMA standard 262, it's known as ECMAScript.

http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/standards/Ecma-262.h...

Reply Score: 2

Sphinx Member since:
2005-07-09

Thanks, I'd almost forgotten.

Reply Score: 2

Joe User
Member since:
2005-06-29

I personally enjoyed O'Reilly's Javascript: The Definitive Guide, by David Flanagan. It's a sort of Javascript Bible.

http://www.amazon.com/JavaScript-Definitive-Guide-David-Flanagan/dp...

Reply Score: 2

snozzberry Member since:
2005-11-14

Actually, Goodman's JavaScript Bible (Wiley) is a sort of JavaScript Bible. It's a reference, not a tutorial, but it's been indispensable to me for seven years running.

Reply Score: 2

no starch press
by happycamper on Wed 21st Feb 2007 16:54 UTC
happycamper
Member since:
2006-01-01

I like No Starch Press's books. I have read many of their books, currently I'm reading Absolute OpenBSD and Debian system, javacript looks really good I'll added to my reading list.

Reply Score: 1

review
by Monkeyget on Thu 22nd Feb 2007 19:43 UTC
Monkeyget
Member since:
2005-07-10

Someone makes a review of a book. If it's a good critic and helps me to make a decision as to weither or not buy the book why not reward the author of the review he wrote?

Reply Score: 1