Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 27th Jul 2007 18:13 UTC
Java Mac OS X is a powerful platform for Java development. While the Java development environment is fully integrated into Mac OS X, the Eclipse integrated development environment brings a fully integrated Java development environment to Mac OS X that provides a consistent cross-platform experience. This article shows you how to use this environment to import existing Xcode projects into Eclipse, tweak key bindings, and integrate Eclipse with the Mac OS X-bundled Concurrent Versions System.
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I like Eclipse
by nevali on Fri 27th Jul 2007 18:59 UTC
nevali
Member since:
2006-10-12

…but on Mac OS X, it still looks like an ugly duckling. I really can't bring myself to use it for anything serious—TextMate + Terminal just seems to win consistently.

Reply Score: 3

RE: I like Eclipse
by BlackJack75 on Sat 28th Jul 2007 06:48 UTC in reply to "I like Eclipse"
BlackJack75 Member since:
2005-08-29

Well, I use it daily on mac and it works pretty fine and doesn't look that ugly.

I use Textmate too but hum... how do you do refactoring in TextMate exactly?

Reply Score: 2

Java
by Harald on Fri 27th Jul 2007 19:14 UTC
Harald
Member since:
2006-03-10

Don't hate me...read this on Slashdot:

"Saying that Java is good because it works on all platforms is like saying anal sex is good because it works on all genders."

Reply Score: 5

RE: Java
by Chicken Blood on Fri 27th Jul 2007 19:15 UTC in reply to "Java"
Chicken Blood Member since:
2005-12-21

So that's a ringing endorsement then.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Java
by Luminair on Fri 27th Jul 2007 19:23 UTC in reply to "Java"
Luminair Member since:
2007-03-30

I have to get behind this post

Reply Score: 3

RE: Java
by fepede on Fri 27th Jul 2007 19:58 UTC in reply to "Java"
fepede Member since:
2005-11-14

That only works for people who uses the same criteria to judge sex and software :-)

Reply Score: 3

RE: Java
by snozzberry on Fri 27th Jul 2007 22:46 UTC in reply to "Java"
snozzberry Member since:
2005-11-14

It isn't?

Reply Score: 1

Java Cocoa Bindings
by thebackwash on Fri 27th Jul 2007 20:31 UTC
thebackwash
Member since:
2005-07-06

Aren't the Java cocoa bindings deprecated as of 10.4?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Java Cocoa Bindings
by Ralf. on Fri 27th Jul 2007 21:48 UTC in reply to "Java Cocoa Bindings"
Ralf. Member since:
2005-08-13

Yes, this is true. But what is your point?

I found it really strange to mix up Java and the Cocoa Widgets. Because you loose the platform independency (wasn't this what Java is for?) and the Swing Widgets with the OS X Look-and-Feel are looking goot and they are working well.

Edited 2007-07-27 21:52

Reply Score: 1

RE: Java Cocoa Bindings
by Simba on Fri 27th Jul 2007 22:53 UTC in reply to "Java Cocoa Bindings"
Simba Member since:
2005-10-08

> Aren't the Java cocoa bindings deprecated as of
> 10.4?

Eclipse doesn't use the Java cocoa bindings. It uses SWT, which is written using Carbon.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Java Cocoa Bindings
by MamiyaOtaru on Sat 28th Jul 2007 22:07 UTC in reply to "RE: Java Cocoa Bindings"
MamiyaOtaru Member since:
2005-11-11

>> Aren't the Java cocoa bindings deprecated as of
>> 10.4?

> Eclipse doesn't use the Java cocoa bindings. It uses
> SWT, which is written using Carbon.

That same Carbon that won't have a 64 bit version? That sounds like it could be fun going forward.

> the Swing Widgets with the OS X Look-and-Feel are
> looking goo(d) and they are working well.

Sort of. I mean they don't look bad, but they aren't seemless. And I don't like being stuck with aqua pinstripes only (the brushed metal look is a hack and apparently not a priority: the resize thumb at the bottom right is still an Aqua thumb etc.) I wonder how/if things will change with the more uniform UI I hear rumours of for Leopard

Edited 2007-07-28 22:09

Reply Score: 2

WOLips
by tyrione on Fri 27th Jul 2007 22:46 UTC
tyrione
Member since:
2005-11-21

For WebObjects developers, the WOLips project and Eclipse are part of the WebObjects Transition.

Reply Score: 1

Uhmmm
by kefkathecruel on Fri 27th Jul 2007 22:52 UTC
kefkathecruel
Member since:
2006-01-17

Did they ever get the Eclipse preferred UI development tools working under Mac OS X? Last I checked they were not functional. They are also based on Carbon which is even a worse situation. I like Eclipse and have used it for a few projects but if you ask me as of 3.x they had a long way to go before it was good to go.

Reply Score: 1

Eclipse on the Mac
by evangs on Sat 28th Jul 2007 17:24 UTC
evangs
Member since:
2005-07-07

I work with Eclipse on the Mac almost daily and I cant fault it in terms of UI fidelity. It looks good, feels better than Netbeans and works better with Java than Xcode.

Browser: SonyEricssonW810i/R4EA Browser/NetFront/3.3 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1

Reply Score: 2

RE: Eclipse on the Mac
by werpu on Mon 30th Jul 2007 10:47 UTC in reply to "Eclipse on the Mac"
werpu Member since:
2006-01-18

Well XCode while probably being the best environment for ObjectiveC development definitely lacks behind significantly once you touch the realm of java, there is no way apple really can catch up to Netbeans and a fully configured well packed Eclipse distro in that area!

Reply Score: 1

OSX is a lousy java development platform
by werpu on Mon 30th Jul 2007 10:46 UTC
werpu
Member since:
2006-01-18

Sorry for sounding so trollish, while I like the work Apple constantly has put into OSXs java, their Swing implementation integrates really nicely, I cannot say Apples work nowadays really helps OSX as java development platform. There is only one reason for that. Their java implementation lacks in terms of being on time currently more than a year. Java6 has been out for more than a year now and yet OSX still does not have it and wont have until their next os version update.

The main problem with this approach is, while it is not critical for deployment, since the server deployments often are half a decade behind the development, it often is critical for development.

Add to that that Eclipse and other platforms are noticably slower on OSX than any other platform and you will get the problem that I prefer to develop under Windows or Linux running in a VM than osx natively.

Reply Score: 1