Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 1st Aug 2007 06:25 UTC, submitted by JK
Hardware, Embedded Systems The Acer Aspire 5710Z has gone on sale in Singapore pre-loaded with Ubuntu Linux instead of Windows. Ubuntu is currently one of the world's most popular and easiest-to-use Linux distributions. But a spokesperson for Acer told ZDNet.co.uk on Tuesday that the company - one of the world's top laptop manufacturers - had 'no plans' to sell any Linux-based systems in the UK. "[Acer models] with Ubuntu pre-loaded are available at the factory level. However, there is no demand for it in the UK. Therefore, those configurations are not an option [for UK customers] at the moment," said the spokesperson.
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Well
by liamdawe on Wed 1st Aug 2007 10:38 UTC
liamdawe
Member since:
2006-07-04

Are they blind? Dell seems to do pretty well with Linux systems.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Well
by Joe User on Wed 1st Aug 2007 10:55 UTC in reply to "Well"
Joe User Member since:
2005-06-29

I tend to agree, but Acer already has experience selling Linux-loaded laptops in Asia. Does Dell sell Ubuntu laptops in the UK? The US, Singaporian and UK markets are different. I guess they did a study prior to their decision. They wouldn't lose the opportunity to make a dent into the UK market. Time will tell.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Well
by Laurence on Wed 1st Aug 2007 11:16 UTC in reply to "Well"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

It's a pity this as I'd sooner buy an Acer laptop than a Dell laptop

Reply Score: 5

RE: Well
by Al2001 on Wed 1st Aug 2007 12:22 UTC in reply to "Well"
Al2001 Member since:
2005-07-06

Source?

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Well
by ichi on Wed 1st Aug 2007 13:47 UTC in reply to "RE: Well"
ichi Member since:
2007-03-06

http://desktoplinux.com/news/NS7159701171.html

No actual sales figures, but "have exceeded expectations".
That and the announcement from Dell that they'll be expanding the linux line suggest they're not doing bad at all.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Well
by Al2001 on Wed 1st Aug 2007 17:37 UTC in reply to "RE: Well"
Al2001 Member since:
2005-07-06

AFAICT that is referring to what's happening in the US market, don't think their available in the UK, are they?

The UK is obviously a much smaller market a business model that is workable in the US isn't neccesarily going to work
in the UK.

Reply Score: 1

I might be 1 in a few million
by Beta on Wed 1st Aug 2007 11:06 UTC
Beta
Member since:
2005-07-06

Ö but I still count, I am demand!


* btw, has anyone else had problems buying a laptop in the UK recently? My brother had a 4 week wait with Evesham messing him around until he cancelled, and went with *I forget*, and itíll be the end of 5 weeks wait when it might arrive this Friday.

Reply Score: 3

RE: I might be 1 in a few million
by PJBonoVox on Wed 1st Aug 2007 11:52 UTC in reply to "I might be 1 in a few million"
PJBonoVox Member since:
2006-08-14

To be honest, if you're going to buy from from a slipshod outfit like Evesham, you're in for a rocky ride.

Reply Score: 2

true
by raver31 on Wed 1st Aug 2007 12:29 UTC
raver31
Member since:
2005-07-06

there actually is hardly any UK based joe users who have actually heard of Linux, never mind want a copy.
they want what computer shops TV adverts are showing them.

Linux needs to get its profile lifted a lot more in the UK.

General Computing <> Microsoft, as the UK population seem to think

Reply Score: 4

RE: true
by JohnFlux on Wed 1st Aug 2007 13:51 UTC in reply to "true"
JohnFlux Member since:
2007-01-04

I tend to talk to random joe public people whenever I'm on a bus, train, plane etc. I'm in the UK and actually most people _have_ heard of linux. They might not know what it is exactly, but they have heard of it.

Reply Score: 2

Not for Acer, anyway
by bimbo on Wed 1st Aug 2007 13:38 UTC
bimbo
Member since:
2006-05-09

Most people with a clue about computers (which would pretty well correlate with Linux users) wouldn't buy Acer laptops after having seen them in stores.

Their LCD displays are quite ok for the price, though.

Reply Score: 1

No Demand...!
by mlauzon on Wed 1st Aug 2007 14:19 UTC
mlauzon
Member since:
2005-07-25

I am not in the UK, but in Canada...don't you just love how companies are still telling endusers after all these years that there is no demand (read: no market) for our products.

For example, take all the video game companies, they've been telling us since the '80s that there is no market for RPGs in North America, that is why we hardly get any.

Stop telling us, the endusers, that there is no market...how do you know, have you actually asked us what products we use?!

Simple answer to that: No.

Reply Score: 5

RE: No Demand...!
by Yamin on Wed 1st Aug 2007 14:49 UTC in reply to "No Demand...!"
Yamin Member since:
2006-01-10

What are you talking about? Do you think companies don't want your business?

And as a Canadian, you might be aware of good RPGs from Bioware like Baldur's Gate... We have plenty of RPGs in North America. Now, even on the console there are good RPGs (jade empire, morrowwind, oblivian...)

Now if you want some the same Japanese RPGs...well despite the worship of Japanese culture by some North Americans, they're just not that popular with most people. Not popular enough to warrant selling it here.

But back on topic...linux in the UK. Here, there might be a case of corporate nudging. Maybe they only want to sell ubuntu in market with high piracy. Maybe they might lose some special deals with MS if they sell in the UK...or maybe...just maybe...there is just not enough demand in the UK.

In either case, ID software is not the MS of gaming, scaring away RPG competition.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: No Demand...!
by mlauzon on Wed 1st Aug 2007 15:14 UTC in reply to "RE: No Demand...!"
mlauzon Member since:
2005-07-25

I know about the ones from BioWare, I do not include them in what I said...of course I should have been more specific. I was talking about all the RPGs that Japan has -- and has had; predating BioWare -- that none of the gaming companies want to translate to English because they still believe there is no demand in North America. There is a lot of demand for Japanese RPGs, gaming companies still stick to some unproven notion that is going on 30 years old that no one in NA really likes RPGs...well it's been disproven time and again.

It's the same thing that Acer is doing to the people of the UK. Did they ask...again the answer always tends to be "No"; it's a bad business choice. Sharp did the same thing to Canada, when they came out with their Linux-based PDA, we had to buy it from the US which cost us almost two times as much. I, and other consumers -- possibly -- are getting tired of this.

What if your favourite videocard, etc. vendor decided not to sell a certain card where you live, but sold it everywhere else?

What has id Software to do with anything, until they bring out an RPG?

Edited 2007-08-01 15:20

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: No Demand...!
by fretinator on Wed 1st Aug 2007 16:14 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: No Demand...!"
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

Sharp did the same thing to Canada, when they came out with their Linux-based PDA, we had to buy it from the US which cost us almost two times as much. I, and other consumers -- possibly -- are getting tired of this.


So which state are you moving to, eh?

Reply Score: 2

No demand from RETAILORS
by aent on Wed 1st Aug 2007 14:52 UTC
aent
Member since:
2006-01-25

In the article, it doesn't say anything about whether or not users are wanting it, it specifically says the retailers in the UK do not want it. Users could very well be demanding it, but the computer shops have no desire to carry it, probably because they're scared it won't sell, even with the success Dell has been having. Dell won't have this problem, obviously, as they are selling it online, no actual inventory.

Reply Score: 6

RE: No demand from RETAILORS
by mlauzon on Wed 1st Aug 2007 15:23 UTC in reply to "No demand from RETAILORS"
mlauzon Member since:
2005-07-25

Possibly being pressured by MS not to sell it, which tends to be the case in most instances.

And, yes I do know what I am implying...there was a computer store in Toronto that refused to sell Linux products, but sold Windows products only; turned out MS threatend to pull their reseller license if they started selling Apple or Linux-based products.

Reply Score: 6

v It's about profit
by ssa2204 on Wed 1st Aug 2007 19:25 UTC
RE: It's about profit
by archiesteel on Wed 1st Aug 2007 19:59 UTC in reply to "It's about profit"
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

You might have had a point if you hadn't resorted to name calling and strawman arguments.

The fact is that Acer *does* offer Linux laptops elsewhere, ergo they must have drivers available for their hardware. And while it's Acer's right to decide that there is not enough demand, that doesn't mean that this is actually the case - you're talking as if corporations never make mistakes with their business decisions.

The fact of the matter is that Dell is enjoying a nice return on their decision to sell Ubuntu laptops in the US. Whether or not such a move would be financially beneficial in the UK or not is up for debate - and despite your aggressive assertions, there is simply not enough hard evidence to say for sure.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: It's about profit
by google_ninja on Wed 1st Aug 2007 20:05 UTC in reply to "RE: It's about profit"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

We have yet to see what kind of returns Dell is seeing in north america. The fact of the matter is that at this point, they have a reputation in the home desktop market unseen since eMachines, due to shoddy hardware and worse support. Considering the marginal cost to offer linux, it would probably be worth their while even if all they get from it is good press, and the image that they are again industry leaders.

I'm not saying they arent doing well with it, and it will be really interesting to see some numbers, but as of now all we can really say is that it isnt making things worse then they already are.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: It's about profit
by SlackerJack on Wed 1st Aug 2007 21:43 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: It's about profit"
SlackerJack Member since:
2005-11-12

The cost of the OS dont come into it, it's about shifting machines. Microsoft let OEM's have Windows dirty cheap to shift machines but because of the shearer amount of them, Microsoft makes the money.

This is like any new product linux or otherwise.

Edited 2007-08-01 21:45

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: It's about profit
by google_ninja on Wed 1st Aug 2007 21:58 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: It's about profit"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

when dell totally dumps MS, and starts offering high quality, well supported products with ubuntu by default at a lower price then the competition, then we will talk.

I just went to the dell website, and after poking through several "customize" options on laptops and desktops, didndt see ubuntu anywhere. in fact, the only mention of linux i could find on the site is dell.com/linux where they talk about their deep commitments and whatnot.

IMHO it is exactly what i said, a desperate attempt to get a better reputation.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: It's about profit
by archiesteel on Wed 1st Aug 2007 22:27 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: It's about profit"
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

I just went to the dell website, and after poking through several "customize" options on laptops and desktops, didndt see ubuntu anywhere.


You know, you could have just typed "Linux" or "Ubuntu" in the search box at the top of the Dell homepage...

Personally, I think your cynicism is misplaced. Dell is taking baby steps, but it seems that it is already paying off. Dell is also getting more involved with the community, though again in a careful manner - for example, Dell was a gold sponsor of the Ubuntu Live and OSCON conferences.

This is to be expected - a large company like Dell isn't going to rush into things (though one has to say the time between the Ubuntu/Dell announcement and the systems' availability was remarkably short). Give it time.

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: It's about profit
by google_ninja on Wed 1st Aug 2007 22:35 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: It's about profit"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

Found it ;-) if you click on any personal/home office links, then scroll down a ways, Open Source PCs is in the essential links category. Click that, scroll down, then click "Shop For Ubuntu", which brings you to a special section with three choices.

Hopefully it plays out the way you suggest, it isn't right to be forced into buying even an oem version of windows if that is not what you use. However, the only people who will find that page are people who are really looking for it, I really don't see how this will increase linux marketshare in any way.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: It's about profit
by SlackerJack on Wed 1st Aug 2007 23:24 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: It's about profit"
SlackerJack Member since:
2005-11-12

Why are people obsessed with market share, it's like dipping your toe in water to test it. Linux world domination takes time. ;)

Reply Score: 3

Freewheeling in Marketing
by TheBadger on Wed 1st Aug 2007 23:15 UTC
TheBadger
Member since:
2005-11-14

This is mostly a story about people not really doing their jobs properly in marketing. Step 1: insist that people don't want Linux. Step 2: don't offer Linux. Step 3: make observation that there's no demand for Linux. Do people tell resellers that they want Linux? Try having a conversation with the local Dixons/Currys/PC World trainee about anything they haven't been trained to sell. Are they really going to pass customer requests back to Acer? And what if people have already asked Acer directly about offering Linux? It's so convenient to claim there's no demand than to actually do anything about it. (And it's convenient for the punters to go elsewhere, too.)

This would just be the usual "safe", "don't stray too far from the pack" mentality on display were it not for Dell's tentative steps with Ubuntu and the whining from Acer recently about Vista making it hard for them to shift laptops, whilst Acer offer only Vista across most of their range. And I don't buy various claims about preinstalled operating systems and inventory. If you buy a Windows laptop these days, Windows isn't actually usable out of the box: it has to finish off the install before anything works.

So, vendors (and competition authorities): how about vanilla hardware and the punter gets to choose which shiny install disk they get to take away? And Acer and friends, how about making your hardware compatible with Linux? Or is it more than just marketing that takes an early lunch break and doesn't show up back at the office afterwards?

Reply Score: 2

Linpus, not Ubuntu
by kirios66 on Sun 5th Aug 2007 06:33 UTC
kirios66
Member since:
2007-06-26