Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 5th Nov 2007 23:16 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems "A little over a week ago, reviews of Asus's Eee PC 701 started to trickle out onto the Internet. Some of the larger publications, like CNet and LAPTOP Magazine got their hands on the unit first, but as it has become more widely available sites like HotHardware and PC Perspective have now put out their own reviews of the Eee PC. The overall verdict is fairly unanimous: the device's keyboard is a bit cramped, but in terms of price, performance, and features the Eee PC hits the trifecta. Indeed, Asus appears to have gotten so many things right with the Eee PC that it could be a game-changer in the mobile market, in terms of both hardware and software."
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You just gave...
by bolomkxxviii on Mon 5th Nov 2007 23:40 UTC
bolomkxxviii
Member since:
2006-05-19

someone in Redmond a heart attack.

Reply Score: 3

Everyone wants one
by Michael on Mon 5th Nov 2007 23:47 UTC
Michael
Member since:
2005-07-01

Every article I've read on this has a comments section full of people saying "I want one" or "I'm getting one". This has got to be a huge hit for ASUS.

I've said before that the mobile market is wide open for Linux. There's no application lock-in and no directx. As long as the product does the job, people are happy, and with thousands of applications available freely, F/OSS software is the most able solution.

And may I add, I want one.

Reply Score: 8

v RE: Everyone wants one
by tomcat on Tue 6th Nov 2007 02:59 UTC in reply to "Everyone wants one"
RE[2]: Everyone wants one
by fsckit on Tue 6th Nov 2007 03:14 UTC in reply to "RE: Everyone wants one"
fsckit Member since:
2006-09-24

This dork will be.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Everyone wants one
by Bobthearch on Tue 6th Nov 2007 04:36 UTC in reply to "RE: Everyone wants one"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

And odds are, none of those dorks will ever pony up the cash and buy one.

Not for $400, that's for sure!

It's certain to be more capable than the OLPC though, and at the same price.

Reply Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

"It's certain to be more capable than the OLPC though, and at the same price."

The machines target two completely different end users and environments. They are not comparible to begin with so bringing up OLPC is really not relevant. You may have had a point if the discussion was about the Classmate but even then, it targets a different environment and end user than OLPC.

As for this dork; I'd be giving it more serious thought if I'd picked up an N800 a few months back. I really hope this trend of low consumption, small form factor, solid state machines continues though. It's nice to see hardware/software combinations coming from major vendors which consider the end user's best interests first rather than Redmond's profits.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Everyone wants one
by PJBonoVox on Tue 6th Nov 2007 12:47 UTC in reply to "Everyone wants one"
PJBonoVox Member since:
2006-08-14

To be honest, I'd probably throw a light version of XP on there. I presume there are others with the same plan, too.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Everyone wants one
by lemur2 on Tue 6th Nov 2007 13:59 UTC in reply to "RE: Everyone wants one"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

To be honest, I'd probably throw a light version of XP on there. I presume there are others with the same plan, too.


If you put XP on yourself, remember ... make sure that you don't use NTFS for the filesystem of the flash "drives". I think that leaves you only with a choice of FAT32 ... even if that makes XP less secure.

You are also going to have to find drivers online for at least the wifi, the webcam and probably the ethernet interface. See if you can't ID the chipsets here by running Linux before you start down the road of installing XP, because it is difficult to do in Windows and be sure you have downloaded the correct driver ... especially if you can't get on to the web in the first place.

... all in all, probably be better to get the OEM to put XP on it for you.

You of course realise that after you put XP on it, you are going to have to fork out a lot of additional cash for applications to bring it up to the out-of-the-box level of functionality of the Linux variant?

For XP you will of course also need to be running a virus scanner, and the CPU is going to be a bit maxed before you get to even think about applications. It will of course require activation, and a pile of Windows updates and it will start phoning home on you.

Are you sure you would want to do all that? Honestly, where is the upside?

Edited 2007-11-06 14:10

Reply Score: 8

RE[3]: Everyone wants one
by mallard on Tue 6th Nov 2007 18:27 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Everyone wants one"
mallard Member since:
2006-01-06

Actually installing XP should be easy, Asus officially support Windows XP on the eee PC.

All the drivers are on Asus's site.

http://support.asus.com/download/download.aspx?SLanguage=en-us&mode...)

Not that I'll be that it with mine though, I'd much rather install [X]Ubuntu.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Everyone wants one
by chemical_scum on Tue 6th Nov 2007 19:44 UTC in reply to "RE: Everyone wants one"
chemical_scum Member since:
2005-11-02

To be honest, I'd probably throw a light version of XP on there. I presume there are others with the same plan, too.

I want one too, but why do you want to bjork the thing with a second rate inferior operating system. I know I have to use XP every day at work.

Though I have my doubts about the integrity of Xandros after entering the MS patent deal, it does seem like that they have but together a very nice, original and usable interface for the tiny system.

Anyway if I wanted to mess around with the OS, I would try e17 on Ubuntu.

Edited 2007-11-06 19:46

Reply Score: 1

A new mobile application platform
by Nycran on Mon 5th Nov 2007 23:53 UTC
Nycran
Member since:
2006-02-06

I'm going to pick one up in December when they arrive in Australia. As a software developer, I think the EEE (and similar) represent a new platform for mobile applications. Great job ASUS!

Reply Score: 2

This is cool + Source code
by nzMM on Tue 6th Nov 2007 00:23 UTC
nzMM
Member since:
2006-06-22

http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2007/11/05/eee-source-c...

It runs Debian. They have all the source code available, does this mean there exists the source code for the drivers as well?

Ive seen ubuntu on this thing, but a version of Ubuntu trimmed and polished for this form factor would rule.

If i had to be critical, and its something i haven't seen the reviewers comment on, its the hodgepodge of Asus interface + Gnome + KDE apps. They pull it off to an extent, but a nice uniform GNOME suite for the Eee and similar form factor PC's would rock.

I'll hold out for next year, like the ars notes, there will be more of these PC's from a number of quarters given the Eee's popularity thus far. And with Intel efforts driving forward development in the mobile + Linux world, I'm holding out for some sweet competition in the next year or two.

Get some decent 3d going and compiz with its expose and exhibit plug-ins would surely be killer on a small screen. At least i envisage it would overcome some of the dexterity limitations of a small touchpad.

Reply Score: 1

RE: This is cool + Source code
by elsewhere on Tue 6th Nov 2007 04:15 UTC in reply to "This is cool + Source code"
elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2007/11/05/eee-source-c...

It runs Debian. They have all the source code available, does this mean there exists the source code for the drivers as well?



It's optimized for Xandros, which is sort of like Debian -3 years, or so.


If i had to be critical, and its something i haven't seen the reviewers comment on, its the hodgepodge of Asus interface + Gnome + KDE apps. They pull it off to an extent, but a nice uniform GNOME suite for the Eee and similar form factor PC's would rock.


If I had to be critical, a nice uniform KDE suite would be a hell of a lot more efficient and resource friendly, a nice side effect of those icky shared libraries and components that are often referred to as "bloat", that would really rock for similar form factor PC's.

Get some decent 3d going and compiz with its expose and exhibit plug-ins would surely be killer on a small screen. At least i envisage it would overcome some of the dexterity limitations of a small touchpad.


You've just decimated the advantage of a low-powered small form-factor PC. Compiz has no place on an 800x600 screen. It calls for an optimized interface with full screen windows, something more akin to a smartphone/PDA than a typical desktop computer.

This is more about portable data access than a pocket Windows-killer, despite the way the press may try to spin it. I see it more as a PDA on steroids than a laptop-replacement. I don't see that as a bad thing... ;)

Reply Score: 12

Cost
by akeru on Tue 6th Nov 2007 00:23 UTC
akeru
Member since:
2007-06-24

I'm still disappointed about the price jump. Initially everyone quoted $199. Then early reviews started coming out saying that the unit was great for the price, but felt cheaply made - though acceptable due to the great value. Later on, rumors circulated that it might be costing more, something like $250-300. It finally releases at $399. I've read a few current reviews and I haven't seen any mention of the build quality now, but I do notice that in that PC Perspective review, they state the price of their review unit would be $299. A few sentences down they update the review saying Newegg is currently selling the same unit for $399.

I just wish that I had never heard anything about $200-300 pricing with the same specs the 4G has. Aside from the price and possible issues with build quality, the device looks awesome. I was planning on getting one, but I can't justify the cost anymore.

Edited 2007-11-06 00:24

Reply Score: 5

RE: Cost
by Ventajou on Tue 6th Nov 2007 00:47 UTC in reply to "Cost"
Ventajou Member since:
2006-10-31

Agreed. $200-$250 would have made it a killer. For $400 suddenly it becomes more of a gadget. You can find complete laptops for close to that price with loads of storage and a readable screen. I'm sure that will make a lot of people think twice.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Cost
by elsewhere on Tue 6th Nov 2007 04:24 UTC in reply to "RE: Cost"
elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

I don't think it's targetting the same market as people settling for a sub-par Vista-basic $400 laptop.

Heck, many people smirked at the iPod when it was launched as being overpriced, and look what happened. It redefined a market because it presented a feature/value ratio that the industry had previously ignored.

It's a bold move, I have my doubts as to whether it will pay off, but I wish them well. It would be nice to see it take off and open a new market.

Edited 2007-11-06 04:24 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Cost
by netpython on Tue 6th Nov 2007 18:29 UTC in reply to "RE: Cost"
netpython Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm curious to know what the development of solid state technology will mean.

Edited 2007-11-06 18:46

Reply Score: 2

RE: Cost
by MiliTux on Tue 6th Nov 2007 06:46 UTC in reply to "Cost"
MiliTux Member since:
2007-05-16

Then early reviews started coming out saying that the unit was great for the price, but felt cheaply made - though acceptable due to the great value. Later on, rumors circulated that it might be costing more, something like $250-300.


Yes, it would be nice if it came out closer to the initial pricing. The HotHardware review said the following about the design:
The casing of the Eee PC is built of a fairly rugged plastic composite. We tested a unit built with a pearl white finish that looks great and gives the unit a very "clean presentation and feel". This unit's finish is also sturdy and resistant to scratches, within reason.

Doesn't sound like they thought it was cheap.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Cost - imagine it in a meeting room
by jabbotts on Tue 6th Nov 2007 14:28 UTC in reply to "RE: Cost"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I just had a image pop into my imagination. Imagine a meeting room table lined with suits and there giant Thinkpads. In walks the presenter, puts this little pearl white clamshell down at the end of the table beside the projector and off he goes.

It sounds like a nice clean little mobile that would work well for presentations. I'm not sure why your comment braught that to mind but so be it.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Cost
by akeru on Tue 6th Nov 2007 18:26 UTC in reply to "RE: Cost"
akeru Member since:
2007-06-24

I was speaking of this review when quoting build quality:

http://www.notebookreview.com/default.asp?newsID=3829

Reply Score: 1

v Nice concept ....
by Anon on Tue 6th Nov 2007 01:43 UTC
RE: Nice concept ....
by PJBonoVox on Tue 6th Nov 2007 12:49 UTC in reply to "Nice concept ...."
PJBonoVox Member since:
2006-08-14

I agree about the 'Americans' comment but I don't think this falls into that bracket. Those idiots allow things like the 'iPhone' to propagate though.

Reply Score: 1

kde
by aseigo on Tue 6th Nov 2007 02:21 UTC
aseigo
Member since:
2005-07-06

can't help but note here ... this thing uses a lot of kde software (in addition to open office and firefox) and you can restore the full kde desktop to it fairly easily with a rather minor amount of messing about.

a great win for free software ... and i'm really stoked that they chose a kde based distribution for it. =)

Reply Score: 7

RE: kde
by Hiev on Tue 6th Nov 2007 17:30 UTC in reply to "kde"
Hiev Member since:
2005-09-27

But dind't Xandros make a deal about patens with MS?

Reply Score: 2

at the expense of microsoft?
by pixel8r on Tue 6th Nov 2007 02:50 UTC
pixel8r
Member since:
2007-08-11

let me just say that although i'm no fan of microsoft, this article has NOTHING to do with microsoft at all.
Its simply a new linux-based laptop. ASUS also mention it will run windows XP and that a version is coming with winxp pre-installed - so how is that a loss for windows?
I'd guess the windows version will cost more.

All the same, it looks very nice but I agree with many of the above comments that its price is a little too high and detracts from the overall value. HOWEVER, whilst it is true that you can get full laptops for only a little bit more, if you want to find an Ultra-mobile one, you'd be paying more than 3 or 4x the price...so bear that in mind when comparing the price with other laptops.

That said, I may end up buying one of these sometime...they are seriously cool. ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE: at the expense of microsoft?
by lemur2 on Tue 6th Nov 2007 03:01 UTC in reply to "at the expense of microsoft?"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I'd guess the windows version will cost more.


About $30 more ... for the OS alone ... after heavy, heavy discounting by Microsoft of the cost to Asus.

Of course, not only will it cost more, but the Windows variant would come with considerably less software.

whilst it is true that you can get full laptops for only a little bit more, if you want to find an Ultra-mobile one, you'd be paying more than 3 or 4x the price


For a Windows UMPC with the equivalent software load, it would be far more than just 3x or 4x times the price.

The equivalent Windows software for UMPC alone would cost you 5x the price.

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20071105-game-changer-asus-eee...
The device does support Windows XP, but Linux seems to be the OS of choice for all of the reviewers for performance and ease-of-use reasons. In this respect, Microsoft has well and truly blown it, because this device is poised to introduce a few million Best Buy shoppers to a pleasantly usable, non-embedded Linux distro. Even more ominous from Redmond's perspective is the fact that the Eee PC is just one of a breaking wave of Linux-powered portable devices that will reach consumers in the coming year, and that it's the hardware makers that are driving the Linux push.


Edited 2007-11-06 03:10

Reply Score: 4

Earl Colby pottinger Member since:
2005-07-06

This does bring up the point about what happens if any company does succeed in shipping a large number of Linux machines before they even try shipping a Windows version.

Microsoft has always depended that computer manufacturers or sellers have Windows machines as the bread and butter of their sales. Thus they always must meet Microsoft conditions or license fees or see their OS costs increase.

If a manufacturer instead is already making it's main income from Linux machines, then Microsoft will have to cut some very sweet deals to compete against a free OS. Expect that if machines like this succeed then the Windows tax to the manufacturers will be slashed to the raw bone and then some.

Edited 2007-11-06 03:28

Reply Score: 5

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Expect that if machines like this succeed then the Windows tax to the manufacturers will be slashed to the raw bone and then some.


... which, of course, is the whole point of having free-market competition, instead of monopoly lock-in, in the first place.

It should succeed just as soon as consumers find out what a 20k-packages-Debian respository full of extra, free, no-malware software to install to your hearts content is like.

I had heard that there was an Ubuntu variant working for this machine also ... possibly Fluxbuntu or the still-to-be-released Ubuntu embedded.

Reply Score: 4

elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

Microsoft has always depended that computer manufacturers or sellers have Windows machines as the bread and butter of their sales. Thus they always must meet Microsoft conditions or license fees or see their OS costs increase.


MS is prohibited by the US anti-trust agreement from playing silly bugger with OEM license pricing based on VARs offering competitive products. They can utilize volume discounts, but they can't penalize VARs for not standardizing.

Where they play games is with the MDF (marketing development funds). These funds are generally made more readily available to vendors that "get with the program". That's the main reason you find a "xxx recommends Windows yyy" on the majority of vendor ads, even if they're advertising non-MS systems.

There's always a way around the system... ;)

Reply Score: 4

Earl Colby pottinger Member since:
2005-07-06

But again even that fails if the company is already successful selling Linux machines as it's main source of income, changing over to a Windows machine makes them a me-too manufactor. Just being offer marketing discounts is not enough, they need enough money to get themselves noticed in a sea of other Windows companies.

That means Microsoft needs to pay them big bucks to do the change-over.

Reply Score: 1

psychicist Member since:
2007-01-27

Microsoft have caused these problems themselves. When you buy a notebook for running Windows you're either stuck with the old malware-prone XP or the very slow and unstable Vista.

At many places for home and business use I've already given the various computers a second life using Linux and the people that use these systems come by just fine with the occasional minor annoyance but nothing like Windows horror stories.

What I've seen over the last few days of totally broken Windows XP installs where even USB/PS2 keyboards just stop working, so it has to be reinstalled from scratch, is just beyond what I consider an acceptable user experience and considering the uptake of Linux and Apple systems many people agree.

What can be taken away from the possible success of this kind of product is that Linux matters very much but the processor architecture will not going forward, i.e. you can run your Linux OS on x86, ARM, MIPS, PowerPC etc. and not have to think about this fact at all because of the mostly seamless support on all of the aforementioned ones.

Reply Score: 3

DigitalAxis Member since:
2005-08-28

It tells me
1.) People don't know about alternatives
2.) People don't care about alternatives
3.) The alternatives are outside their comfort zone
4.) They think that's the way computers are SUPPOSED to be

Reply Score: 3

dagw Member since:
2005-07-06

5.) People tested the alternatives and found that they didn't meet their needs.

I'm a Linux user and the simple truth is that XP isn't that bad.

Shocking thought I know.

Reply Score: 3

chemical_scum Member since:
2005-11-02

I'm a Linux user and the simple truth is that XP isn't that bad.

Shocking thought I know.


I'm a Linux and XP user and the simple truth is that XP isn't that good. I hear Vista is worse.

Reply Score: 2

psychicist Member since:
2007-01-27

Hmmmmm. I hear this complaint a lot from Linux advocates, but I just don't see it materializing much in real life. Perhaps the hundreds of millions of functional Windows XP machines are simply an aberration.


Do you have any telepathic gifts? I've seen the systems in a totally unusable state that I've never managed to get Windows XP into myself. I've never said that people couldn't be happily running Windows XP, but there are surely many people that aren't all that happy about it either.

Or maybe you're simply unlucky. Or perhaps you're simply incompetent. Either way, you guys are vastly exaggerating problems in hopes that people will switch. So far, it really hasn't happened. What does that tell you?


I find it preposterous to claim that I'm incompetent, when I didn't install the systems to begin with. I got them in this state and was asked to fix them, for pay of course. Also I'm only one person and don't suffer from a multiple personality disorder so who is "you guys" actually?

I've reinstalled Windows XP on them with many open source applications that I'd also install on Linux, Mac OS X or Solaris, with the hope that they don't become as easily infected as when I just left the MS crap as the defaults.

You can stick your head in the sand but it's a reality today that in spite of the vast improvements in the stability of Windows (with the exception of Vista) since 95 was released it's still far easier to break than a Linux system, particularly Slackware based.

Reply Score: 2

ssa2204 Member since:
2006-04-22

Isn't funny and ironic that the people that complain most about Windows are the ones who either do not use it or simply do not like the OS in the first place?

Reply Score: 1

psychicist Member since:
2007-01-27

I've run every version of Windows from 95 to Vista at very high load and seen improvements over the years but also not the kind of stability and resilience (a.o to malware and rogue processes) that you get with UNIX based systems.

For those who really want Windows XP I'll install it to be as fast and stable and locked down etc. as possible but in the end it still appears not to be enough.

A large part is probably that most people (have to) run as root because otherwise their applications or peripherals don't function correctly.

As it is (or perhaps with the arrival of Vista, was?) using Windows under a limited user account is too annoying and frustrating because too many things don't work, so people take the easy route and just run as administrator.

Primarily Microsoft because of their lack of application permission enforcement early on and secondarily ISVs because of their neglect to code to Microsoft's guidelines are to blame for this situation. It's not something end users can do a lot about.

What UNIX brings to the table is a much stricter permission scheme that was imposed from the get go, starting with CTSS and Multics.

Windows has the same kind of enforcement with NT permissions but it's not as integrated within the NT kernel, more of an add-on. Please correct me if I'm wrong with this and provide links to authoritative information.

What I really want to know is how many of those who say Windows is such a wonderful operating system and in a certain sense the third coming, have ever run another OS, that is either UNIX, VMS or MVS based or even something entirely different.

Reply Score: 3

Earl Colby pottinger Member since:
2005-07-06

No, it is not.

It is us techs and nerds who tend to use the non-windows systems but have to maintain Windows as part of our jobs that are doing the complaining.

Most machines I have bought in my life have been non-windows from day one. The laptops I have bought did come with Windows, the hard drives were replaced within minutes BeOS, Haiku or Linux. There is a reason I did that.

Reply Score: 2

v Uh, no thanks
by tomcat on Tue 6th Nov 2007 02:57 UTC
RE: Uh, no thanks
by lemur2 on Tue 6th Nov 2007 03:15 UTC in reply to "Uh, no thanks"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Great, just what I want in a laptop: a "cramped keyboard". /not


0.92 kg. 15W. Full software suite. 15-30 seconds boot. $399. No viruses.

"You can't do that with Vista".

Reply Score: 11

RE[2]: Uh, no thanks
by elsewhere on Tue 6th Nov 2007 04:34 UTC in reply to "RE: Uh, no thanks"
elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

"Great, just what I want in a laptop: a "cramped keyboard". /not


0.92 kg. 15W. Full software suite. 15-30 seconds boot. $399. No viruses.

"You can't do that with Vista".
"

You could barely do that with MS-DOS. ;)

Reply Score: 6

add more applications
by zerohalo on Tue 6th Nov 2007 04:17 UTC
zerohalo
Member since:
2005-07-26

Is it possible to install other debian apps, or is it limited to those pre-installed?

Reply Score: 1

RE: add more applications
by lemur2 on Tue 6th Nov 2007 04:26 UTC in reply to "add more applications"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Is it possible to install other debian apps, or is it limited to those pre-installed?


AFAIK it is possible to replace the whole OS with another distribution (or even with Windows for that matter).

It is more-or-less a generic PC, architecture-wise.

I'd be very, very surprised if it didn't have links to Debian repositories already set up for you.

If it doesn't, then just add some. There will doubtless be a lot of places springing up on the Internet offering "get your free eeePC software here".

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: add more applications
by phoenix on Sat 10th Nov 2007 03:24 UTC in reply to "RE: add more applications"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

The Add/Remove Software applet only connects to the Asus repos, and does not have a lot of software available.

However, with a little work, you can get Konsole to open (use Open With from the file manager), and then you have access to anything you can get via apt-get.

Reply Score: 2

RE: add more applications
by elsewhere on Tue 6th Nov 2007 04:35 UTC in reply to "add more applications"
elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

Is it possible to install other debian apps, or is it limited to those pre-installed?


It's Xandros-based, which means it's Debian-based, but it will be touch-and-go with the latest packages. Give it time, and the community will throw up specialized repos.

Reply Score: 6

RE: add more applications
by spikeb on Tue 6th Nov 2007 05:08 UTC in reply to "add more applications"
spikeb Member since:
2006-01-18

it doesn't run debian, it runs the debian based as proprietary as possible xandros

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: add more applications
by lemur2 on Tue 6th Nov 2007 06:06 UTC in reply to "RE: add more applications"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

it doesn't run debian, it runs the debian based as proprietary as possible xandros


So put Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy) on it instead, then:

http://community.zdnet.co.uk/blog/0,1000000567,10006278o-2000331777...
http://community.zdnet.co.uk/blog/0,1000000567,10006284o-2000331777...

There is certainly no shortage of software for Ubuntu.

Reply Score: 3

RE: add more applications
by lemur2 on Tue 6th Nov 2007 11:05 UTC in reply to "add more applications"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Is it possible to install other debian apps, or is it limited to those pre-installed?


The short answer: YES you can install other apps.

The long answer:
http://www.downloadsquad.com/2007/11/02/up-close-with-the-eee-pc-pa...
http://forum.eeeuser.com/
http://wiki.eeeuser.com/howto:icewmstartmenu

Edited 2007-11-06 11:16

Reply Score: 3

v their directly lying announcements
by Redeeman on Tue 6th Nov 2007 07:08 UTC
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

they just shouldnt have said $200 and not have it be reasonably close to that. From where i come, we call this LYING.


They weren't lying. Prices of some components changed, particularly the flash memory and the screen.

A very similar thing happened to the OPLC, which had an initial price estimate of $100 per unit and has ended up costing twice that per unit to produce ... non-profit.

If you don't want one, then don't get one ... but you shouldn't let the initial optimistic price target put you off ... if the company could have made them for that initial target price, it would have.

If you are realistic about making a decision on one of these, ask yourself the following questions:
(a) do I actually want a UMPC?
(b) can I get any other one as capable as this one, with all software pre-installed for me, for anywhere near the price?

Edited 2007-11-06 10:49

Reply Score: 4

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

If your component prices are that variable -- we're talking about DOUBLE the original price


No we aren't. Not double.

http://www.osnews.com/permalink.php?news_id=18882&comment_id=283100

$299 is not double $200. It is a 50% increase over original optimistic estimates.

Reply Score: 3

Redeeman Member since:
2006-03-23

well, yes, i do want an umpc, can i get one comparable cheaper? maybe not, but that doesent mean they should be directly putting out fake announcements of golden cheap prices.

Reply Score: 1

At that price...
by Downix on Tue 6th Nov 2007 11:37 UTC
Downix
Member since:
2007-08-21

At $400, I'd sooner buy the OLPC's buy-one-give-one. I'm just looking for a cute laptop for my son.

Reply Score: 1

To everyone who wants a $200 version
by Moochman on Tue 6th Nov 2007 11:51 UTC
Moochman
Member since:
2005-07-06

I forget where I read it but supposedly they may be introducing other models in the next few months. This may include one for around $200 with 2GB SSD and no webcam:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASUS_Eee_PC#Configurations

Reply Score: 2

Prices
by Kishe on Tue 6th Nov 2007 12:41 UTC
Kishe
Member since:
2006-02-16

Eee PC 4G $399 with 512MB memory and 4G flash drive and built-in camera


Eee PC 4G Surf $349 with 256MB memory and 4G flash drive and built-in camera


Eee PC 2G Surf $299 with 256MB memory and 2G flash drive

Reply Score: 2

RE: Prices
by BBlalock on Tue 6th Nov 2007 15:04 UTC in reply to "Prices"
BBlalock Member since:
2006-01-15

And if it'll boot off an external USB drive then the 2G version will good enough for many folks.

Use the internal drive with the original Linux OS for normal stuff and then have a 8G thumb drive for whatever "full-featured" OS you like.

Heck, put a custom server distro on it and turn it into a wireless access point with NAS using a 3.5" USB drive enclosure.

Reply Score: 2

Laptop ACER with HP Printer for $499
by truckweb on Tue 6th Nov 2007 22:49 UTC
truckweb
Member since:
2005-07-06

And this is the $CAN price. You can check it out at www.thesourcecc.com

ACER AS4315-2097 NOTEBOOK PC
Features an Intel Celeron M530 1.73GHz processor, 512MB DDR2 SDRAM, an 80GB hard drive, 14.1" CrystalBrite TFT LCD WXGA display, DVD-Super Multi double-layer drive, Intel® Graphics Media Accelerator, and Windows Vista Basic.
HP PHOTOSMART C3180
WORDPERFECT OFFICE X3

For $499 !!!!

Okay, it's bigger than the EEE, but....!!!

Reply Score: 1

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Features an Intel Celeron M530 1.73GHz processor, 512MB DDR2 SDRAM, an 80GB hard drive, 14.1" CrystalBrite TFT LCD WXGA display, DVD-Super Multi double-layer drive, Intel® Graphics Media Accelerator, and Windows Vista Basic.


There is a good argument to say that "Windows Vista Basic" is not a feature.

I do have a way around that deficiency for this laptop, though.

Since this laptop uses Intel GMA, which has an open-source 3D graphics driver, and it has an HP printer, which has Linux drivers (hplip), then I would consider buying this unit, keeping the Vista license sticker, wiping the hard drive and installing Ubuntu, and then downloading libdvdcss, Microsoft core fonts and any other fonts and codecs from Microsoft that Ubuntu can use. Windows drivers shouldn't be necessary for this laptop.

The Vista sticker I would keep in case anyone questions my use of Microsoft's fonts and codecs under Ubuntu on this laptop. Since I paid for Vista, and I have the sticker to proove it, I clearly have a license to use any Microsoft-patented technology in Vista.

Edited 2007-11-07 00:00

Reply Score: 3

andrew Member since:
2005-06-30

May I ask who would care about your use of fonts and codecs? I mean who in the world would bother you about that?

Reply Score: 1

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

May I ask who would care about your use of fonts and codecs? I mean who in the world would bother you about that?


Only people posting on sites such as OSNews where they like to claim such things as "using Microsoft codecs is illegal on Linux" ... even though Microsoft offer said codecs and fonts for free download or as part of the base OS install.

To such claims you can then simply reply: "I couldn't buy a PC without Vista basic pre-installed, so because of that I have paid for a Microsoft license for this machine, even though there is no Microsoft OS left on the machine now ... neener neener".

See? The monopoly tax is good for something, at least. At last!

Reply Score: 3

tonestone57 Member since:
2005-12-31

You're right, I can also find regular notebooks with 14 or 15" screens that sell for $500 to $600 ( with better specs ) than the Eee PC.

Many people want something that is real compact, easy to carry around & lightweight. This is what makes the Eee PC the next cool thing to own.

No one else offers a subnotebook for this price. Subnotebooks tend to sell for lots more money. And yes, they do have better specs, but people want a low cost, sub-notebook and the Eee PC is the only one selling right now ( VIA has the NanoBook but it doesn't look as good - so, no real competitor ).

Sub-notebooks tend to have a screen size of 8 to 11" or close to that ( smaller & lighter than regular notebooks ).

Reply Score: 2

v2 or v3 maybe
by Not_So_Deep_Thought on Tue 6th Nov 2007 23:48 UTC
Not_So_Deep_Thought
Member since:
2007-11-06

Following the ultra mobile pc market from announcements to releasing of respective projects (OLPC, UMPC and EeePC) the one I beleive that has done the best so far is the OLPC. I know the OLPC is geared for grade school children but it has features I would like to see incorporated into the next Eeepc. First being the screen, not size wise as I would like a bigger screen on the Eeepc (9.5" 16:10), but their oled screen would be perfect especially with it ability to switch to a high-resolution mode that is sunlight readable, higher resolution ( no side scrolling)and low power req. Second being the tilt/swivel screen with scroll buttons added (up/down) so it could be more easily used as a ebook reader. Third would be to make the screen a touchscreen. Fourth add bluetooth with physical on/off switch for it and wifi. Fifth use a standard Compact flash slot (user accessible/replaceable) for the the main drive and a second CF slot for additional storage or to make use as a /home drive. Sixth upgrade the camera 1.3mp still & 640*480 30fps video and make it able swivel around to rear. Seventh would be a better touchpad. I think with these refinements/additions Asus would have something few if anyone could match or beat and would be a runaway success even @ a $399.00 price point.

Reply Score: 1

waiting for new version
by buff on Wed 7th Nov 2007 00:57 UTC
buff
Member since:
2005-11-12

I was thinking of getting one for school. Newegg was selling them but a user posted a comment that 1 Gig version with 8 MB Flash RAM will be out before the end of the year. I think the 1 Gig version will suit me better. I can't wait to get it. It will be perfect for connecting to the school's wifi system from lounges and study rooms.

Reply Score: 2

At last! Sometheing to replacement my Psion
by lamare on Wed 7th Nov 2007 15:38 UTC
lamare
Member since:
2007-11-07

It seems that at last some company sees the light in offering a small ultra-portable device with a decent keyboard, like the Psion 5mx had years ago.

I use my Psion daily in the train between home and work to read e-books, type reports, etc. It's the only thing so far I found that is both portable enough to always carry with you *and* has a useable keyboard to be able to type draft reports and small notes without freaking RSI'ing your thumbs....

Mine runs Debian Linux (text-only) from a 2 GB compact-flash card. I can run bash, vi and python, but....

Major drawbacks of the 5mx are its display, the lack of a decent pdf viewer and no wireless connectivity. It's about time someone came up with a replacement.

Still, the 3e is no match for the battery-life of the 5mx. My Psion lasts at least a week on 2 standard 2500 mAh penlight rechargeables...

It also beats me why todays manufacturers seem to be unable to build anything that uses *standard* batteries. For my Psion I can buy replacement batteries at any street-corner, years after the device went out of production. Why does each and every manufacturer think its nececarry to wrap the batteries with their own non-standard wrapper, while they could easily make a sleeve for 3 or 4 standard penlight cells, like the Psion had years ago?

Anyway, 3 or 4 hours of battery life is enough and all the other plusses more then outweigh the silly non-standard batteries. Nobody but me seems to care about things like that anyway.

So,... I can't wait until I can get one.

Edited 2007-11-07 15:44

Reply Score: 2

v i don't care
by muffenme on Wed 7th Nov 2007 23:48 UTC
RE: i don't care
by Torsten Rahn on Thu 8th Nov 2007 18:06 UTC in reply to "i don't care"
Torsten Rahn Member since:
2005-08-20

Well one of the nice things about the Asus Eee PC is of course the fact that in opposite to other smaller devices it's a "real" computer ;-). That means that people can run all linux-x86 binaries that work on their desktop PC or on their larger notebook. Also you can just plug in a larger USB keyboard, a USB-mouse, maybe an external 2.5"-USB-harddisk and a large LCD monitor and there won't be much of a difference compared to any other "real" PC (except for lower performance). Try to do that with any other "smaller" device :-)

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: i don't care
by muffenme on Mon 12th Nov 2007 03:56 UTC in reply to "RE: i don't care"
muffenme Member since:
2006-01-05

Any computer can run linux look at the playstation 2. This isn't a selling point the other thing makes your small light computer into a desk top when you think for what you need to equal to notebooks that was sold 4 years ago. This thing isn't that small.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: i don't care
by muffenme on Mon 12th Nov 2007 03:57 UTC in reply to "RE: i don't care"
muffenme Member since:
2006-01-05

Any computer can run linux look at the playstation 2. This isn't a selling point the other thing makes your small light computer into a desk top when you think for what you need to equal to notebooks that was sold 4 years ago. This thing isn't that small.

Reply Score: 1