Linked by Michael Reed on Wed 21st Nov 2007 14:13 UTC
Apple When computer company Apple announced that they were planning to make a phone, most pundits felt sure that Apple would produce something a bit different from the crowd. An Apple phone would have to be a plush, prestige unit and the product of a thoughtful design process.
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Okay
by agildehaus on Wed 21st Nov 2007 14:53 UTC
agildehaus
Member since:
2005-06-29

While your points are all valid (albeit presented in a rather insulting manner), it is a first generation product and Apple most certainly will be offering an SDK for it soon enough. What other company can make such an interesting phone their first attempt? Not many. That is what makes the iPhone appealing, not to mention that it offers one of the most pleasant web browsing experiences on a mobile device out there (you're welcome to blast it for not having 3G here, I'm pissed too).

Reply Score: 5

RE: Okay
by hibridmatthias on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:23 UTC in reply to "Okay"
hibridmatthias Member since:
2007-04-11

This wasn't really insulting at all. I thought it was a nice article and I agree with him...

...though if it ran linux (:-)) or allowed me to run all the ruby apps for dosage/plasma drug level/dosage interval calculators Ive written for work on it I might consider it...

Or Ill just wait for an eeepc and use my free Nokia phone that I got with my contract...

These are my choices just like the author had his. That is what is great about (semi)free markets...and technological evolution, like the theory Linus espouses...

Edited 2007-11-21 16:29

Reply Score: 7

RE[2]: Okay
by bogomipz on Wed 21st Nov 2007 22:03 UTC in reply to "RE: Okay"
bogomipz Member since:
2005-07-11

If the iPhone ran Linux, the product wouldn't be so interesting any more. It's not the hardware that is the slick part, it's the software.

That said, I was puzzled when the iPhone arrived, and it was clear it did not support 3rd party apps. It's Cocoa based for crying out loud! Why don't they make that its greatest advantage? Well, in the last couple of months Apple has announced that this will change, so we'll see.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Okay
by Flatland_Spider on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 08:45 UTC in reply to "RE: Okay"
Flatland_Spider Member since:
2006-09-01

OS X is a *ix, so the criticism that it isn't linux is kind of silly. Besides any utilities you'll miss can more then likely be installed via macports.

If they would allow access to a Terminal I'm sure you could get them to work.

"Mac OS X 10.4 has ruby and irb (interactive ruby) installed by default, so I was able to just type "irb" and follow along with the examples."
http://aplawrence.com/MacOSX/ruby_on_rails.html
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=os+x+ruby&btnG=Google+Search

Reply Score: 1

WRT openness
by diegocg on Wed 21st Nov 2007 14:56 UTC
diegocg
Member since:
2005-07-08

Apple is going to release a SDK, you know...

Reply Score: 8

vanfruniken Member since:
2006-07-18

Really a non-issue in a few months time...

Reply Score: 2

I liked the IPhone, but..
by thabrain on Wed 21st Nov 2007 14:57 UTC
thabrain
Member since:
2005-06-29

I liked the IPhone, I wanted an iPhone, but when it came to trading out for a new phone (I'm with AT&T already), I ended up choosing the AT&T 8525 instead.

Why?

The main reason was "full" Exchange server support. The iPhone supports IMAP; which I don't have implemented, and for security reasons, is shut off.

The AT&T 8525 supports ActiveSync, which is what I needed for day-to-day use.

Also, I had gotten used to a "physical" keyboard to input data on, and in using the keyboard on the iPhone, it didn't have the tactile response I was used to. This wasn't the dealbreaker for me though.

Oh, and 3G definitely helps; I understand Jobs reason for doing so, but 3G does work better than Edge does.

Otherwise it's a great unit, and had those 2 things been more robust, I would have went with it.

Edited 2007-11-21 15:00

Reply Score: 3

RE: I liked the IPhone, but..
by Kelly Rush on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:23 UTC in reply to "I liked the IPhone, but.."
Kelly Rush Member since:
2005-06-30

Wow, this is almost EXACTLY the same path I took. =)

In my opinion, the iPhone is a smartphone for people that don't really want a smartphone. For how cool it looks, and how nice the UI is, and how slick of a package that combination makes, it really isn't that powerful; I don't mean that from a hardware perspective (because by those measures, it certainly is powerful), but more from a software perspective. First and foremost is the lack of an SDK. Yes, I know, Apple says they will release one soon (though in what form is yet to be determined), but it goes past that. On my Windows Mobile device, I can load up a hacked ROM if I want, and completely change how the phone works. The development platform is very mature at this point, so there are many, many applications available.

I like the iPhone. I think it is going to do a lot of good in moving people away from the junky throwaway free phones they are accustomed to (most of them weren't even really aware of smartphones, and if they were, didn't know why they should even care). In that regards, I am appreciative of what the iPhone is, and what I think it will do. I think it will introduce the concept of a phone as more of a portable computing device to the masses, and that is a good thing; however, I am already at that point, past that point, and I want something that does more.

Who knows, maybe a few years out, the iPhone will have evolved into more of an open device that will suit my purposes. For now though, I need something that gives me more control.

Reply Score: 6

RE: I liked the IPhone, but..
by Marquis on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:32 UTC in reply to "I liked the IPhone, but.."
Marquis Member since:
2007-01-22

Ok I have to ask what this is about and I am not in love with exchange or windows but I have to use it.

"The main reason was "full" Exchange server support. The iPhone supports IMAP; which I don't have implemented, and for security reasons, is shut off."

What is insecure about the exchange IMAP server ? What about it is any more insecure then the exchange pop3 or MAPI server?

Reply Score: 13

RE[2]: I liked the IPhone, but..
by thabrain on Wed 21st Nov 2007 21:14 UTC in reply to "RE: I liked the IPhone, but.."
thabrain Member since:
2005-06-29

Ok I have to ask what this is about and I am not in love with exchange or windows but I have to use it. "The main reason was "full" Exchange server support. The iPhone supports IMAP; which I don't have implemented, and for security reasons, is shut off." What is insecure about the exchange IMAP server ? What about it is any more insecure then the exchange pop3 or MAPI server?

IMAP only provides the email component; it doesn't provide sync support for Contacts, Tasks and Events, which I do use on a constant basis. Also, in case my phone is stolen, I can remotely wipe the device using OWA or the admin console; I can't do that with IMAP.
The iPhone also doesn't support push email for Exchange; ActiveSync does.

Edited 2007-11-21 21:15 UTC

Reply Score: 4

Functional vs. non-functional
by Larz on Wed 21st Nov 2007 14:58 UTC
Larz
Member since:
2006-01-04

Sometimes I think that people in the "geeky" crowd tend to overestimate the importance of functional demands vs. non-functional demands. Of course functions (or features) are what gets the job done. But non-functional demands (ease of use, simplicity, "feel good factor" etc.) tells us about how the job gets done.

I am certainly not saying that the "bling" factor is not a major reason behind the iPhone hype. My point is that valuing non-functional attributes is not in itself irrational, but actually very important. Its just that the process of valuing non-functional aspects is very hard, and the process will often be based on emotions.

Edited 2007-11-21 15:01

Reply Score: 7

RE: Functional vs. non-functional
by Network23 on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:39 UTC in reply to "Functional vs. non-functional"
Network23 Member since:
2005-07-11

Sometimes I think that people in the "geeky" crowd tend to overestimate the importance of functional demands vs. non-functional demands. Of course functions (or features) are what gets the job done. But non-functional demands (ease of use, simplicity, "feel good factor" etc.) tells us about how the job gets done.


This is very true.

I had the beautiful Nokia N95 with 5 megapixel camera etc and found it to be absolutely piece of shit since it takes at least eight seconds to focus and actually take a frigging picture. I now have some 4 GB worth of useless pics and it doesn't really matter that these useless pics have a 5 megapixel resolution.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Functional vs. non-functional
by butters on Wed 21st Nov 2007 20:51 UTC in reply to "Functional vs. non-functional"
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

Introductory vignette:

When I choose a gadget, the first criteria that comes to mind is: which gadget would I most like to have a beer with or have sex with (depending on the gadget's anthropomorphic gender identity). Usually the relationship ends in heartbreak and betrayal. Why don't the gadgets in my life love me for who I am rather than who they want me to be!?!...

The problem with consumer culture is that we seek emotional and social validation through our purchasing decisions. There are three distinct subconscious desires that motivate these behaviors: to fit in, to stand out, and to rise above. Whichever desire dominates in a particular individual determines their reaction to products and advertising. A fourth desire, to be oneself, is the least common, but it's the fastest growing market in much of the world.

These so-called "reformers" (from the perspective of the prevailing establishment) dominate the technical and creative intelligentsia. They don't want to be like everybody else. But they certainly don't want to be told how to be different, nor do they feel like they're better than everybody else. Why do they insist on being different? Because they are different, and they universalize this idea to suggest that we're all different.

But not totally different. Ironically, of the four groups, the reformers are the most likely--and the conformers are the least likely--to acknowledge that everybody is fundamentally similar. We're not the same, but we share a broad range of values. The difference between the reformers and the competitors is that while they both believe deeply in their own uniqueness, the reformers believe that these differences can be reconciled, whereas the competitors believe that they must battle for superiority.

The symbiotic relationship between the competitors and conformers is a cultural juggernaut, whether in politics, religion, or society. However, the relationship between the aspirers and reformers is tentative and uneasy. The reformers tend to think that the aspirers seek empowerment in all the wrong places. The reformers are broadly criticized for having an overly optimistic faith in humanity.

The conflict mainly centers around whether or not we embrace difference and whether or not we seek an active role in decision-making. The four quadrants define the four underlying social motivations.

To quote the not-so-great Donald Rumsfeld, "freedom is messy". But I believe that it's a beautiful mess so long as everybody's voice is equally heard and everybody's opinion is equally respected.

I hope you've found this comment vaguely on-topic.

Edited 2007-11-21 20:52

Reply Score: 9

Cutting edge features
by Moulinneuf on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:02 UTC
Moulinneuf
Member since:
2005-07-06

The iPhone may be lacking in the normal area that people are used to judging cellphones or really in the pack. But where it shines is in the cutting edge features the other's don't have.

- The touch screen is superbly implemented.
- The touching keyboard is working for most users.
- The Internet browser as no real equal on cellphone.
- The phone dialing is huge compared to other phone.
- the contacts info are more personal and visible.

What differentiate this phone from other is also it's HUGE screen that permit displaying and taking pictures in a way that no other phone can.

It's music player and Video player system is one of the best , the quality of the sound speaker could be a bit better. It's Music and Video distribution system as no equal from anyone yet.

It's widget system is really appealing to have information , stock and weather in real time is fun to watch.

People who say they don't want one concentrate too much on what they don't like about it , where as those who buy one know that for that price it replace :

- Phone
- Good camera
- Music and video player
- Practical web browser
- Portable map delivery system ( GPS )
- Portable search computer :

http://www.apple.com/webapps/searchtools/

Could it be better , yes , but the competition is not even trying , so Apple have the leadership to do what they want.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Cutting edge features
by agrouf on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:12 UTC in reply to "Cutting edge features"
agrouf Member since:
2006-11-17

"Could it be better , yes , but the competition is not even trying , so Apple have the leadership to do what they want."

I don't understand this sentence.
What do you mean exactly?
Nowadays, every phone has a camera, a music/video player and a web browser (except the really really cheap ones).

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Cutting edge features
by Gryzor on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:21 UTC in reply to "RE: Cutting edge features"
Gryzor Member since:
2005-07-03

You either didn't read or didn't get his points.

Cameras in phones suck. iPhone camera appears not to be much better (but nicely integrated from what I've seen).
Every music/video player I've tried is almost unusable. It's either Slow as Hell (damn symbian/nokia/etc.) or imposible to understand.
And don't get me talking about web browsers.

I have an iPod Touch (no iPhone in Spain yet), but I've used an iPhone for a "few minutes" and I use the iPod Touch almost daily.

The amount of overload they took off the user by implementing things the way they are in the iPod/iPhone is amazing.
It must not be the perfect phone, it may not copy/paste, etc., but you can definitely do things in 2 seconds, things that in my Nokia N70 (or the N95 for the matter), can take you up to 15 seconds. Seriously, have you ever used a Motorola?

Finding a contact takes at least 5 seconds. On the iPhone is SO easy to do just that, that I am shocked. I really couldn't care less for EDGE/3G. I just want a phone. Sending SMSs and calling somebody should be so simple that I don't understand what's wrong with Nokia, Sony and Motorola NOT getting the point. They insist on adding more and more stuff to already slow phones that can waste 3 seconds redrawing the screen. Not to mention when you just have to reboot because they hang.

I don't have an iPhone, I've barely seen/used one for minutes. I "just" have the "demo" version -> ipod touch.

All I can say is that if the iPhone makes finding a contact, calling him, sending him a msg, etc., as easy as the iPod Touch makes finding a song, then its a real revolution.

YMMV.

Reply Score: 6

RE[3]: Cutting edge features
by rockwell on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:13 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Cutting edge features"
rockwell Member since:
2005-09-13

//Finding a contact takes at least 5 seconds. //

Wow. 5 seconds. What a wait.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Cutting edge features
by PlatformAgnostic on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:25 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Cutting edge features"
PlatformAgnostic Member since:
2006-01-02

That is actually pretty bad. The ostensible purpose of a phone is to dial people, so finding contacts is a common case. Also, it's not like the data structures to do this efficiently are poorly-known or unimplemented. Flash on phones may be slow, but they have fast processors and lots of RAM, so they ought to be pretty quick.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Cutting edge features
by rockwell on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:27 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Cutting edge features"
rockwell Member since:
2005-09-13

Ok, but does it take 5 seconds because of the software, or because of him?

Reply Score: 0

RE[3]: Cutting edge features
by agrouf on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:29 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Cutting edge features"
agrouf Member since:
2006-11-17

"Cameras in phones suck. iPhone camera appears not to be much better (but nicely integrated from what I've seen). "
2.0 megapixels is cheap nowadays.
I expect 3.2, or even 5 for the latest phones.

I tend to agree that the software they ship usually suck (at least those I have tried : nokia and sony), but you can easilly install opera and oplayer for browsing and playing movies or rally3D for gaming.

I like the iPhone look and it is a good phone, but to say that others don't even try to compete is just plain wrong. There are tons of competing similar products.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Cutting edge features
by Moulinneuf on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:29 UTC in reply to "RE: Cutting edge features"
Moulinneuf Member since:
2005-07-06

"I don't understand this sentence. "

I know you do , you just disagree with my observation. Just by reading your comment.

"every phone has a camera"

Yes , but do they all have a picture display as big and as fast as the one Apple iPhone as , does it sync with computer so easily can you send them as easily ?

The answer is no Win for Apple iPhone here.

"a music/video player"

Yes , but is it as beautiful ? Most of the time no , as integrated with a distribution system like iTune ? No , does it permit vertical and horizontal viewing and controlling ? No ? Does it has Album cover display , no , etc ...

Another Win for Apple iPhone.

"a web browser"

Yes , but is it a browser like safari with the same capacity and features , we are talking about a browser that is built for speed and beautiful rendering that as almost instant zooming with the touch of the screen.

Another win for Apple iPhone.

And like I said you concentrate mostly on what the other's have to compare , it's the little thing and those added feature on top of them that the iPhone as that differentiate and give it the edge over the others.

I am not saying it's the top available solution in each category , not that it's perfect and for everyone , don't get me wrong , I am sure that for each feature other's have one better solution but not all of them on the same phone.

Size , weight and design are also big factor some are brick but can do better , some are better design but can do less , other are the same but are ugly.

It's like comparing a small helicopter to a car , both are vehicules , both get you from point a to point B , except one goes over traffic and the other don't, etc ...

Put a price one each and every features , you will see that the iPhone for the number of device it replace and for what it does is at a very good price point and is superior to what the competition offer in the same price range.

Edited 2007-11-21 15:39

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Cutting edge features
by nstuart on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:26 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Cutting edge features"
nstuart Member since:
2005-07-06

See, what you don't understand is that (most) people here can't have this fudgy middle ground. It either sucks or it doesn't. It couldn't possibly be good enough for some people if it's not good enough for themselves.

As you said, the iPhone isn't perfect, it has its flaws, but know what? It does just work. It works as a phone, as a web browser, as an email reader, as a music player and does all of this with style. It does ALL of this, and people here still bitch because it doesn't have an SDK yet that only 1% of people care about. Or because it lacks some other feature they think it should have! (I'll agree on missing network types, Edge is slow!)

We here that read OSNEWS are NOT the NORM! My Mom/next door neighbor/whoever doesn't care or know what an SDK is, or that doesn't have 3G. They see a pretty UI and go "oooo! Pretty!" And then they find its not only pretty, but *shock* it actually works as advertised!

Reply Score: 1

v RE[4]: Cutting edge features
by Moulinneuf on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:50 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Cutting edge features"
RE[5]: Cutting edge features
by nstuart on Wed 21st Nov 2007 21:20 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Cutting edge features"
nstuart Member since:
2005-07-06

Articulating what you what 'else' what you would like to see in the iPhone is different then writing a whole article on ALL the reseaons why you don't want one and why you don't think its a good device.

And I never said we were smarter, we just see these types of devices from a very different view point. BIG difference.

And (as I stated before) I agree that the iPhone isn't perfect and could use improvements, so I never said don't complain or let apple know about it. But telling apply what you think and giving suggestions is different then writing a whiney article smashing the iPhone as being completely usless (ok, so this one may not be that strong, but others out there are a lot worse).

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Cutting edge features
by nstuart on Wed 21st Nov 2007 21:46 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Cutting edge features"
nstuart Member since:
2005-07-06

*please ignore some the typos in my previous reply! yeah for proof reading!*

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Cutting edge features
by eggs on Wed 21st Nov 2007 19:55 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Cutting edge features"
eggs Member since:
2006-01-23

"because it doesn't have an SDK yet that only 1% of people"

While only 1% may be developers that want to make apps, way more than 1% will download other's apps and install them if they could. Thus, one could argue that though they might not know what an SDK is lots of people want it indirectly.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Cutting edge features
by DigitalAxis on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 06:06 UTC in reply to "RE: Cutting edge features"
DigitalAxis Member since:
2005-08-28

I think he means that nobody in the US wanted touchscreen only phones until Apple brought out the iPhone

(either in that Apple did it right, or people deciding that if Apple is pushing it, it must be good enough for them.)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Cutting edge features
by Robocoastie on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:41 UTC in reply to "Cutting edge features"
Robocoastie Member since:
2005-09-15

"People who say they don't want one concentrate too much on what they don't like about it , where as those who buy one know that for that price it replace :

- Phone
- Good camera
- Music and video player
- Practical web browser
- Portable map delivery system ( GPS )
- Portable search computer :
------------------------------------

Why do you need those replaced? Why on earth would I need a slow speed web browser? Why on earth do you think I NEED a GPS "delivery system". And why do you think I'd need a phone, video, and music player rolled into one device?

Focusing on what people DON'T like compared to another is simply the most effective way of deciding between products. For me the iPhone has two huge hurdles: 1)joined at the hip to AT&T whereas any other cell phone I can switch to another carrier, IOW I own the phone (provided I'm not in a contract) it doesn't own me. 2)The whole "bricking" Apple did showed that Apple thinks they own your iPhone and that you are less than a renter (I feel the same way about MSFT's EULA on hardware such as the XBOX).

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Cutting edge features
by Moulinneuf on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:09 UTC in reply to "RE: Cutting edge features"
Moulinneuf Member since:
2005-07-06

"Why do you need those replaced?"

Less baggage to carry ... 1 device vs 6. There is no need either , just that it's a solution for those who want it.

"Why on earth would I need a slow speed web browser?"

The speed is defined by your connection and the processor and website content your browsing to , safari render in nanosecond on fast connections.

"Why on earth do you think I NEED a GPS "delivery system"."

If you get lost or are looking for a specific location on say boulevard taschereau ( it span over 6+ city )

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&geocode=&time=&date=&ttype=&q...

"And why do you think I'd need a phone, video, and music player rolled into one device? "

Why not ? you prefer to carry 3 + more device ?

"Focusing on what .. of deciding between products."

I prefer testing myself , most of the time people never tried the product and are just repeating what others are saying , each individual have different needs. It's a case by case situation.

"1)joined at the hip ... it doesn't own me."

There are unlocking methods also with most phone people get a contract , in order to get the phone anyway.

2)The whole "bricking" ... as the XBOX).

That's a problem you will have with every phone company , the telcos are very powerful lobby everywhere.

I would personaly prefer that those where to be made illegal by laws. Maybe that's what Apple is pushing for.

I am defending the Apple and iPhone user position here , but I agree with you that those are big hurdle , but as I said the competition is not doing anything better.

Reply Score: 0

v RE[3]: Cutting edge features
by Robocoastie on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 07:03 UTC in reply to "RE: Cutting edge features"
RE: Cutting edge features
by BluenoseJake on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:59 UTC in reply to "Cutting edge features"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

"- The Internet browser as no real equal on cellphone"

any phone that will run Opera has at least the option for an equal or better browser.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Cutting edge features
by Arun on Wed 21st Nov 2007 20:58 UTC in reply to "RE: Cutting edge features"
Arun Member since:
2005-07-07

Having used Opera Mini 4 on a few devices and now owning an iPhone I can say that the OPs statement is quite realistic.

The browser is not the issue. The multi-touch display and tilt sensors coupled with a large screen on the iPhone make it a lot better than any phone running Opera.

Edited 2007-11-21 21:12

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Cutting edge features
by BluenoseJake on Wed 21st Nov 2007 22:10 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Cutting edge features"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

I was responding to the parent post's assertion that it was the best mobile browser. I never argued about the interface of the phone itself.

Reply Score: 2

v RE[4]: Cutting edge features
by Moulinneuf on Wed 21st Nov 2007 22:58 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Cutting edge features"
RE[5]: Cutting edge features
by BluenoseJake on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 12:46 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Cutting edge features"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

"The Internet browser as no real equal on cellphone"

That is the same as saying that it is the best browser for cellphones, or the worst. When soemthing has no equal (in english) is is the best, unparalleled, nothing is better.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Cutting edge features
by christianhgross on Wed 21st Nov 2007 21:11 UTC in reply to "Cutting edge features"
christianhgross Member since:
2005-11-15

>Could it be better , yes , but the competition is not even trying , so Apple have the leadership to do what they want.

Nice fanboy action dude... Have you even looked at the competition. I have and interestingly enough I am looking at the Sony Ericsson and not the iPhone. No idea why, but while the iPhone is interesting it is not for me.

Maybe it is the fact that I restrict and have everything determined for me???? Ever think of that one?

Reply Score: 3

v RE[2]: Cutting edge features
by Moulinneuf on Wed 21st Nov 2007 23:43 UTC in reply to "RE: Cutting edge features"
Honk! Honk!
by Weeman on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:17 UTC
Weeman
Member since:
2006-03-20

I've bought an iPod Touch, which is the same platform minus the phone. And even Apple didn't release the SDK yet, I have a fair load of third party applications installed, including ScummVM, to replay my favorite classic LucasArts adventures. So that point's moot already.

And if the SDK is out in February, software will be more readily available.

Reply Score: 2

im getting an iPhone
by REM2000 on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:21 UTC
REM2000
Member since:
2006-07-25

Ive gone through many phones and they have all lacked in one way or anothers.

My P910i is great smartphone, but lousy at taking pictures, occasonally crashes and is very big and bulky compared to other phones.

My E60i is great email/messenger tool, great at surfing the net and can access many documents (PDF's word etc..) however it hasn't got a phone and the multimedia aspects are practically non existant.

My Sony K550i takes mediocre pictures (2MP), it's pretty good at email and useless at surfing. It's ok at multimedia and bluetooth support.

I could bore everyone and go on with this list. The things i want from a phone can be found in the iPhone. This is not something i have just leapt into, i considered the N95 and the Sont K850i. However i like the ability to carry films, music videos and music around with me, i like the QWERTY keyboard (ive got a touch so im used to the typing), i like the excellent email support (i use a IMAP email account). I like the phones ease of use, making conference calls, putting people on hold and switching between people on hold. I like the web browsing experience.

I have considered everything about the iPhone and it's list of negatives such as lack of 3G, however the plus points still win out.

The iPhone is not for everyone, phones are quite a personal thing, what works for one doesn't work for another, we all have different needs. However the one thing that the iPhone brings to everyone is competition. Something which the phone industry has needed in a long while. This sounds like a stupid statement given the number of phones and manufacturers. However they all have one thing in common, they all release there phones far to early, resulting in bugs and glitches, they also don't innovate enough. Hopefully the iPhone will push the industry as a whole, and make all of the manufacturers thing more carefully about their phones UI and other abilities.

Reply Score: 3

v RE: im getting an iPhone
by rockwell on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:35 UTC in reply to "im getting an iPhone"
What's the relevance?
by cipri on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:23 UTC
cipri
Member since:
2007-02-15

"The iPhone: I Don't Really Want One".
And I don't like dark chocolate.
What's the relevance of both propositions?

Reply Score: 2

Why did I read this?
by ninjawombat on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:28 UTC
ninjawombat
Member since:
2007-11-17

Not getting a device that you want because it is too "hyped" is the same in my mind as getting it because it is hyped. In both cases you base your decision on what others think rather than on what you need. Silly.

The brilliance of the iPhone is that it is almost unique in the category of high-end *consumer* phones. If you want a smartphone that does corporate email, those already exist! If you want a cheap phone with all the best hardware but the software is so lame that you can't really do much with it, there are bazillions of those. If you really want your keyboard to take up have of your device such that you have a smaller screen, you're already happy. What about the rest of us?

Every feature is a compromise. Hardware keyboards or big screen. Top specs or usability. Third party support and iPhone release delayed by 1 year, or release now and support 3rd parties later. Etc. Etc. Let's be glad that Apple at least is making different compromises compared to everyone else and offering a different device. That's why saying that the iPhone isn't for you is about as interesting a me saying that the crappy entry-level motorola phone most people get for free with their plan isn't for me.

I don't have an iPhone and won't get one, but I just see the logic behind Apple's decision and from a business point of view of pleasing one type of customer *very* well, they are by and large the right ones. But somehow people have to complain over and over about the fact that Apple didn't make their first device just for them! All I have to say is don't get an iPhone, and you don't need to tell me about it.

Reply Score: 3

Utter rubbish.. can't believe OSNews publishes
by Arun on Wed 21st Nov 2007 15:45 UTC
Arun
Member since:
2005-07-07

trash like this.

So according to Reed anyone that purchased an iPhone didn't have a well reasoned process.

I am waiting for all the stories of how Michael Reed didn't buy the thousand other phones on the market and bought the one he did because he has the best reasoning on the planet. What a joke?

Who cares if Michael Reed didn't buy an iPhone? Who the hell is Michael Reed anyway?

Reply Score: 8

Michael Member since:
2005-07-01

Who cares if Michael Reed didn't buy an iPhone? Who the hell is Michael Reed anyway?

Well, according to Wikipedia, he's a British cinematographer who worked on such films as "Dracula: Prince of Darkness" and "On Her Majesty's Secret Service". Sounds like a pretty cool guy.

Reply Score: 2

DigitalAxis Member since:
2005-08-28

Wait, he did Bond but he doesn't like gadgets?

That can't be right.

Reply Score: 2

Arun Member since:
2005-07-07

Well, according to Wikipedia, he's a British cinematographer who worked on such films as "Dracula: Prince of Darkness" and "On Her Majesty's Secret Service". Sounds like a pretty cool guy.

May be I should write an article about why I didn't watch either of the movies.

Also According to his picture on his blog he looks too young to have worked on "On Her Majesty's Secret Service".

Reply Score: 2

Arun Member since:
2005-07-07

http://www.unmusic.co.uk/?module=NukeWrapper&file=all_about_me.html

"My name is Michael Reed aka Robin Hyder. I am boy/girl/thing who was created on 31/01/76. I live in a grim town in the North East (UK) with my mum and her husband and two cats. Not wishing to sound boastful but I'm more of a geek than a nerd."

Sorry you have the wrong guy. The link on the Article has the above blurb in the About Me section.

Reply Score: 2

tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

So according to Reed anyone that purchased an iPhone didn't have a well reasoned process.

Read the article again. Reed never says that. What he says is that the iPhone falls short in several areas, goes on to point out what they are, points out how over-hyped the device is, and then suggests how to react to somebody who chose the device purely for reasons that can't be expressed rationally. He's not saying that YOU didn't use a well reasoned process. You may well have done so. But many people don't. Pet rock, anybody?

Reply Score: 1

Style
by Almafeta on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:08 UTC
Almafeta
Member since:
2007-02-22

Style can refer to ease of use and ergonomics - in other words, how something fits into a person's life. Style can be the difference between "plug in and play" and "become frustrated while fiddling with drivers, settings and connectors".

Very true, but contradicted by this:

However, being a closed platform, the iPhone makes it very difficult for third parties to develop software for it.

You can't have your cake and eat it too -- third-party software, or standardized coherent user experience. Unless, of course, you 'vet' all third-party software...

(Of course, that might have been the entire point you were making. If so, don't mind me, carry on.)

Reply Score: 1

RE: Style
by Robocoastie on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 06:36 UTC in reply to "Style"
Robocoastie Member since:
2005-09-15

"Style can refer to ease of use and ergonomics - in other words, how something fits into a person's life. Style can be the difference between "plug in and play" and "become frustrated while fiddling with drivers, settings and connectors"."

Not true, you've just revealed how new to computers you actually are. "Plug and play" actually refers to not having to adjust com ports and IRQ's by hand. It has nothing to do with drivers. Even a basic usb mouse has a driver, it just happens to be included in most operating systems.

Reply Score: 0

Justify
by MikeekiM on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:12 UTC
MikeekiM
Member since:
2005-11-16

I can justify the iPhone if I can sync notes, from my computer.
Still waiting...

Reply Score: 1

I am waiting...
by sigzero on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:13 UTC
sigzero
Member since:
2006-01-03

I will look harder at the "next gen" iPhone. I think by 2.0 there will be a full SDK and a lot of the "bugs" worked out.

Reply Score: 2

It's not luck!
by affect on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:13 UTC
affect
Member since:
2006-09-27

"Apple are on a run of good luck"

Apple is not lucky, rather, it is innovative and competent, something that MS is not, despite the monopoly status and an endless supply of cash.

I won't get an iPhone myself, not because it is not a terrific product, but because it doesn't meet my needs now. If it doesn't meet yours, you shouldn't get one, but you cannot deny that many do find it a revolutionary product and have voted for that with their dollars (check the numbers).

To pre-empt any "Mac Fanatic" attacks, let me say that when apple stops making decent products, I'll sell my MacBook and buy a Dell. I don't see that happening any time soon, though!

Reply Score: 1

RE: It's not luck!
by rockwell on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:51 UTC in reply to "It's not luck!"
rockwell Member since:
2005-09-13

// rather, it is innovative and competent, something that MS is not, despite the monopoly status and an endless supply of cash. //

I was wondering how long till we got a token "anti-Microsoft" rant, just for the sake of it.

How is Microsoft related to the iPhone again?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: It's not luck!
by affect on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 05:12 UTC in reply to "RE: It's not luck!"
affect Member since:
2006-09-27

Microsoft, via Ballmer, ranted about how expensive the iPhone is and tried to dismiss it just like the writer of this ranting article.

I find it bothersome when someone dismisses innovation rather than give a well-balanced critique. Sure the iPhone is not a geek's dream and doesn't have all the features in the world, but it does have some unique features that no other phone has. And it is an innovative product with mass-market appeal. When did microsoft last bring us an innovative and competently-made product like OSX, iPod, iPhone, ...?

See the connection now?

Reply Score: 1

v RE[3]: It's not luck!
by rockwell on Wed 28th Nov 2007 22:34 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: It's not luck!"
Well, I DO want an iphone.
by Sabon on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:15 UTC
Sabon
Member since:
2005-07-06

As soon as my contract with Verizon is up, I'm moving to an iPhone. It does everything I need and want it to except sync to my Prius' phonebook. I'm sure someone will figure that one out.

Reply Score: 2

Smeagol
Member since:
2006-01-16

Yet another random Joe opinion. It doesn't match my opinion, so I am not going to read this article. Maybe in a future version of this article he'll fix the 2 major missing things. He's just been lucky that I even bothered to post this.

Reply Score: 3

BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

"He's just been lucky that I even bothered to post this."

Why, just like you are not interested in his opinion, I doubt that he is that interested in yours, if you can't be bothered to read the article anyway

Reply Score: 3

Clear some things up
by Neopoe82 on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:23 UTC
Neopoe82
Member since:
2007-11-21

First Apple is not a computer company. It's a company now, not just computer company. The change from Apple Computer Company to Apple inc.

Iphone was never advertised as a business phone. It was advertised as a phone.

If you didn't take the time to watch the presentation of the phone before it was released, then you have nothing to complain about the reason it is desired. There's no circular logic about it.

Reply Score: 1

Phones are a fashion statement
by PlatformAgnostic on Wed 21st Nov 2007 16:52 UTC
PlatformAgnostic
Member since:
2006-01-02

The iPhone does so well because phones, more than almost any other piece of electronics, are a fashion statement. Why do you think the Motorola RAZR was so popular with all its various colors? The author of the article is right that Apple does a great job of selling devices that both appear cool (delighting the user's emotional side) and work quite well (appealing to the user's logical side). For something as visible as a phone, as long as it meets the bar of basic functionality, the coolness trumps everything else.

MS isn't incompetent, as someone suggested earlier. They just have a different mindset which produces products that are more rationalistic and less emotionally appealing. Thus you get Windows Mobile, which competes with BlackBerry for businesses, and iPhone which competes with the throwaways for consumers and geeks. Or you have Windows, which does quite well on the corporate desktop, and MacOS, which is popular on college campuses. In some sense, the Apple people might have difficulty thinking the MS way and vice-versa, so this dichotomy might persist for a while.

I, for one, hope the oPhone takes off:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WazA77xcf0A.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Phones are a fashion statement
by Odisej on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 09:43 UTC in reply to "Phones are a fashion statement"
Odisej Member since:
2006-05-11

Well, now, really. The iPhone does so well because Apple puts millions of dollars in advertising. That's it. They sell ridiculously expensive equipment to the masses and you can only do that by building hype. That's what Apple does best. Whether it's computers, mp3 player or whatever. I've used better and cheaper alternative in all categories. But of course, since nobody advertises sansa, acer ferrari or alienware using Einstein (who would never use an Apple, btw, being too smart and all) nobody cares. i, for one, don't buy equipment so that I can brag around.

Reply Score: 3

ssa2204 Member since:
2006-04-22

You are absolutely correct on this. Regardless of the merits of the device, a good portion of the sales has more to do with the hype. It is a sad testament to the materialism in society. There is a large percentage out their that want one simply because of this trend.

I do not mean to necessarily knock the iPod, but in many ways this is a product that is built upon a lot of hype. I remember having a Diamond Rio, one of the first ones out there. So I am actually shocked when I see mainstream articles present the iPod as the first out there. As of today, there are numerous devices out there that are a better bargain in terms of price/storage size.

The iPhone at $500+ dollars is a testament to material obsession. How many purchasing, how many who waited in line really need an iPhone. Or better yet how many will even use any of the features that supposedly make it distinct. Similar to all those that rushed out to get the first camera phones, regardless of how crappy the quality of the camera is.

Another aspect is something I really have to question, do you REALLY need e-mail, web browsing etc.. on ANY phone? Are you truly that important that you must be this accessible? For about 99% the answer is no. I remember years back I was the director of IT at this company. The VP insisted upon having everything in the book, and my god so much time was invested in making sure his Ipaq synched, his contacts and calender synched etc.. Problem was, this guy was about as worthless to the company as a pencil. Yet his ego demanded that he was this important as to require my help desk to constantly attend to him while forgoing more serious issues. I have no doubt that if this was the present he would demand an iPhone. You see, for him this was all about ego, and not necessity.

To add to that, I really have to question WHY you want all this all the time? Are there not times when you can simply just go out and NOT be connected to your e-mail, IM, web? I see these days kids justing sitting around playing with their phones, yet they are hardly conversing. Some of my best memories from college were the nights my friends and I went out and did nothing but converse. I remember once seeing a group of about 3-4 younglings, for over an hour all I saw was them talking, IM'ing, and text messaging OTHER people. There is something wrong when you go out in public and you need to do this. I can accept if your wife is pregnant wanting to insure contact with all the family in case the water breaks...but come on, 99% of you do NOT need to be checking your e-mail while out on Friday night. This is just vanity, and the iPhone hype helps to insure your vanity is solid. In the end, it is just a phone, and the wise consumer needs to question why is $500 a value for a phone when they can get one for under $100.

Reply Score: 5

Robocoastie Member since:
2005-09-15

I don't think they are overpriced actually as much as everything else which relies on chinese and Tawainese slave labor is underpriced.

Reply Score: 1

......
by islander on Wed 21st Nov 2007 17:02 UTC
islander
Member since:
2007-04-11

The iPhone: I Don't Really Want One *sigh
I want a Linux smart phone ! ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE: ......
by hibridmatthias on Wed 21st Nov 2007 17:22 UTC in reply to "......"
hibridmatthias Member since:
2007-04-11

AWESOME! Me too...one that i can program apps for...

Reply Score: 2

So
by zombie process on Wed 21st Nov 2007 17:29 UTC
zombie process
Member since:
2005-07-08

Am I allowed to agree with the author that I don't need or want one?

Reply Score: 2

RE: So
by Soulbender on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 04:45 UTC in reply to "So"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Sure, but just as with the author not a single person on this planet cares if you want it or not.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: So
by zombie process on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 16:50 UTC in reply to "RE: So"
zombie process Member since:
2005-07-08

OMFG TEH BURNZ!!!!!

Reply Score: 0

iPhone: The leash of the Marketeer.
by davonshire on Wed 21st Nov 2007 17:30 UTC
davonshire
Member since:
2007-11-15

I've read, and read about the iPhone. I recognize it as a great big techno lollipop with a flavor that lasts and lasts and doesn't make your fingers sticky. none of that inspires me to own one.

It can browse the web via edge or wifi and Steve sensible being that his is recommends where possible do it wifi. Again nothing to inspire me to own an iPhone.

Excellent interface for your contacts and messaging. God knows iPhone enthusisists have so many contacts it can take them minutes to find the person they were wanting to call or send a message to on a normal phone. So this just helps make everyone tighter. I'm certain by now most of them have iPhones too. Still nothing here for me to get excited about.

It is by and large a fine cludge of technologies to wow the masses and accomplish many things in one, svelt package. Admittedly there in lays a reason to consider owning one. If only to minimize the number of physical items to keep track of in my daily goings.

But then, there is the one thing I wanted, something that actually had me chomping at the bit to really consider owning one of these marvels of Steve Job's belly button lint.. Multimedia enjoyment. I can watch video, movies, listen to my favorite music wirelessly. No more being tethered to a tiny device that has all these amazing things going for it except...

Well crap it doesn't actually have A2DP or any means to talk to a stereo wireless headphone. It has Bluetooth 2.0 but.. it doesn't have this seemingly natural, obvious, pratically manditory capability. So here is the stumbling block. I'm not a Marketeer's pet. I will not be sold on something that is suppose to be so revolutionary, so mind blowingly capable and easy to use, under the premise that someday, many fixes and versions down the road, perhaps will be made availible to me.

Or maybe it will end up in the 3rd or 4th generation of the unit. I just have to upgrade to the newest device and I'll have what should have been there in the beginning.

Other cellphone makers pack as much into their high end phones as they can. Apple puts only as much into their product as they can to get a WOW and buzz running. And then thinks about adding more as time and market allows.

Everyone complains about how new software is Market and patch after sale. This is no different. Perhaps a software upgrade will give the iPhone A2DP. But it's not in it now and that's what makes the difference.

I have a portable media player that's smaller than an iphone. It's got 4GB of storage and I can plunk in another 4GB of SD if I want for a total in device storage of 8GB. It can play videos, music, record in stereo, has a FM radio that it can record from as well, has 2 wired headphone jacks and bluetooth 2.0 and has A2DP. It can even connect straight to my video system and play MPEG4 video. Oh yes and I can change the battery on it myself.

It doesn't make phone calls. It doesn't surf the web. But it did something that the iPhone at this moment can't. It satisfies all the things I want in one package. And less than a quarter of what an iPhone's purchase price is.

I didn't have to pay with a credit card for my device, I didn't have to install software on my computer to enable the capabilities it provides. I didn't have to sign into itunes or even use any media manager of any kind.

I never have to worry that leaving my media player on, I'll end up with a phone bill for thousands. Or that updating my media player will disable it because of code I ran on it.

It's simply a reasonably priced device that does what any media player does with a number of convenient enhancements. For the price I paid, every thing they put into the device works as one would expect with no exception. Infact it actually surprised me on a few things it did have I was not aware of at the time I purchased it. Which to me means I got 'Value' for every dollar I spent.

If the iPhone does all you want right now. I'm happy for you. I'm sure it will be a treasure to you for some time to come. But if you bought it in hopes that eventually you can use all it should be able to do. I'd say you've got a very nice leash there. And eventually your Marketeer will decide when you can have what they want you to have.

Wow I got wordy on this. Sorry for the rant. ;)

Have a happy.

Davonshire

Reply Score: 4

The Apple faithful vs. Apple fanatics
by bousozoku on Wed 21st Nov 2007 18:00 UTC
bousozoku
Member since:
2006-01-23

There is a difference in the groups. The Apple faithful aren't necessarily fanatical or gullible but the fanatics are. They've conjured grandiose visions of the next Apple product and made it to be 1000 % bigger and better than what Apple have done, so as to be completely disappointed. They will curse Apple for not meeting their desires, even though the desires are ridiculous, and they'll curse Apple for not giving it away for free.

Those fanatics had been outside Apple stores for days in advance, ready to buy a phone just so they could shove it in your face and say "haha, I've got an iPhone and you don't."

The current iPhone is perfect for them. It's not enough for the rest of us who already have 3G data access and can live with a lack of ease of use a bit longer. I like the iPhone software because it's quite thoughtful but the hardware is lacking for now.

June 2008 can't come soon enough.

Reply Score: 2

Bluetooth - Audio
by elsmob on Wed 21st Nov 2007 18:34 UTC
elsmob
Member since:
2006-01-09

This is my biggest complaint. I know Apple is talking about adding support in the future, but...today, it does not exist. Nor does syncing, copying files or any other feature over bluetooth...just voice.

I do have a Jabra A120S bluetooth device that works on anything that has a 3.5mm jack. Problem is, the jack on the iphone does not allow the connector to be completely pushed in so I never get sound.

Not a big fan if itunes, but I can get over that. Wished I could sync with corporate exchange server, but..oh well, I can still use a browser to get my mail.

Overall, the phone is great and I believe (excluding the jack problem) most annoyances will be resolved in future firmware updates...well, maybe just the bluetooth.

Reply Score: 1

iPhone
by anevilyak on Wed 21st Nov 2007 18:40 UTC
anevilyak
Member since:
2005-09-14

For me the issue isn't really the hardware/software bundle, though I'd definitely like to see exactly what restrictions the SDK does and doesn't have on it before making a decision on that point. The bigger hurdle in the way for me to adopt an iPhone is AT&T. I refuse to give that company money, and as a consequence, Apple will see no business from me until the exclusive deal's up.

Edit: And yes, I'm well aware that you can technically hack it to unlock the carrier, load 3rd party apps, etc. now, but I have neither the time nor the inclination to engage in that perpetual cat-and-mouse game of firmware updates.

Edited 2007-11-21 18:44

Reply Score: 3

Two-seaters
by StephenBeDoper on Wed 21st Nov 2007 18:48 UTC
StephenBeDoper
Member since:
2005-07-06

I ask you, is a person who buys a two seater, open-top, sports car a fool? Does such a car beat a sensible car in terms of pure utility?


Unless you define the usage scenario a little more specifically (not to mention what is meant by a "sensible car"), then you can't really answer that question conclusively.

If you're talking about a family that regularly needs to transport 3-4 people, large amounts of groceries, etc, than yes - a larger car does make more sense in that scenario. But if you're talking about a single person who normally travels alone or with one other person, isn't a two-seater much more "sensible" - not to mention less-wasteful?

Reply Score: 2

thavith_osn
Member since:
2005-07-11

What a waste of an article. What did it tell us?

Like someone else here pointed out, why doesn't tell us what else he won't be buying, like chocolate?

I'm not sure why OSNews publishes this. I don't mind that the guy doesn't want an iPhone, I probably won't get one either, who knows, but he had no "real" reasons. He kept telling us there was nothing wrong with it and that Apple had made a great phone...

He might get a phone with more "geek" features - lol... Please, give us a break... I hope he has a great "geek" car and "geek" house and goes on lots of "geek" holidays (maybe to the "geek" islands - lol)...

Sorry, I keep laughing at my jokes...

Reply Score: 6

StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

Like someone else here pointed out, why doesn't tell us what else he won't be buying, like chocolate?


Perhaps he might have, if there was some contextual reason to do so.

But I don't think there's been any sort of insane hype-fest centering on chocolate lately, nor have I seen any forum postings asserting that chocolate will be the death-knell of every other remotely-similar food item.

Reply Score: 4

Apple dropped the ball
by eggs on Wed 21st Nov 2007 19:58 UTC
eggs
Member since:
2006-01-23

They had the perfect opportunity to rock the phone world, but they decided to leave off 3G and leave developers out in the cold. One of the main contributing factors for Microsoft's rise to power (and Linux) is friendliness to developers. I don't think I've used an IDE I like more than Visual Studio and you can't beat looking at everyone else's code in the open source world.

But Apple decides to lock everyone out rather than try and build a community around it, which they should be all for considering the community is the only reason they made it through the 90's.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Apple dropped the ball
by VManOfMana on Wed 21st Nov 2007 21:45 UTC in reply to "Apple dropped the ball"
VManOfMana Member since:
2006-11-01

They didn't leave developers out in the cold; the SDK is not ready yet, with the Safari-based platform available in the meantime. Sure, at the end the fact is that today there is still no public API developers can use, and I am not going to argue that. What I am arguing against is the overdone assumption that Apple made a deliberate decision to close the iPhone to outside development.

Apple had their priorities straight: put up a product with a feature set that is solid for most people to use on a daily basis. 3G and the SDK are not part of that. 3G is something that will be added when the coverage, cost and others factors allow it. The SDK is still on development. But compared to other things such as the GUI, touchscreen interface, random access voice mail, Safari, etc., they are not critical components of what makes the iPhone stand out. It's going back to the 'not the what, but the how' details that a feature list-oriented mindset seems to miss.

As of myself (clarifying where I stand), I really admire the iPhone as a consumer device since it really appeals to my geek side (user interfaces). But I don't have one. The simple fact is that my current needs for phone and music does not justify getting an iPhone or a smartphone.

Reply Score: 1

Usable phone
by Leroy on Wed 21st Nov 2007 20:45 UTC
Leroy
Member since:
2006-07-06

All this talk about features is nice and all, but the one thing I have never found in any article is this: Range.

Really, when you need to call (yes, I prefer to talk instead of text), you need a signal. I'm on my third phone due to the new AT&T (same old AT&T) changing the technology. Everytime the ability to make a call has been reduced.

Anybody remember cellphone antennas for cars?

Yes, I've seen the iPhone. Even have to support one on the network. Now don't get mad. I don't hate the iPhone nor do I like it. I just want a phone with great signal range.

Reply Score: 2

JonathanBThompson
Member since:
2006-05-26

And I'd certainly appreciate pure opinion pieces being labeled as such, as this isn't an "article" worth reading, and reeks of an attack on users of the mentioned product as to their mental fitness. If there's any mental fitness in question, it'd be that of the writer of the article for going out and lambasting the people that purchase the iPhone, and then that of the editors of OSNews not labeling this as purely an opinion piece.

(Note: I do not own an iPhone)

Reply Score: 3

yakirz
Member since:
2006-05-11

but I'm waiting for Mac Expo 2008. I am hoping for GPS, and looking forward to 3rd party apps. I'd love 3G, but the iPhone will probably get it long before my region supports it. I have EDGE on my Treo 680, and it's serviceable using the Treo's browser or Opera Mini, but not much better than dial-up speeds.

Why is the iPhone not considered a "smartphone?" I guess I don't have the definition in front of me, because it does much more than just allow telephone conversations. It has e-mail, web, camera, PIM, etc., so what is missing? Is Exchange Server compatibility what makes the difference? Because I don't run Windows and don't give a damn about Exchange.

Reply Score: 1

Wha...
by postlogic on Wed 21st Nov 2007 22:39 UTC
postlogic
Member since:
2007-06-28

Ok, I haven't read all of the 60+ comments, so if this has been mentioned, I'm sorry for repeating.

Anyway, I see you say "I was able to download a piece of software that let me revisit some of the classic computer games from my youth by effectively turning my hand-held into circa 1984 vintage computer. Great fun, but this is the sort of thing that the iPhone isn't very good at."

The iPhone is not a PDA, as far as I've understood. My cellphone, a HTC S710, is also not PDA. I can't do that. I was hoping you'd, in the same paragraph, complain about it not being to run most midp-apps. So you kind of lost the entire thread in that as far as I'm concerned. Being able to run an old app on your PDA is *not* the same as being able to run an old app on your cellphone (smartphone). The iPhone not being able to run java apps, is one of the greater downsides for my part.

Java, while, especially midp, is hell and gruesome, it has a shitload of apps on this platform. As well as games. Not supporting that, in my opinion, is just plain poor. And while it's being fazed out, it's STILL used a LOT.

Also, I don't want the iPhone because it can't even send a damn MMS. That's just low.

Edited 2007-11-21 22:42

Reply Score: 1

RE: Wha...
by nevali on Wed 21st Nov 2007 23:13 UTC in reply to "Wha..."
nevali Member since:
2006-10-12

Java, while, especially midp, is hell and gruesome, it has a shitload of apps on this platform. As well as games. Not supporting that, in my opinion, is just plain poor. And while it's being fazed out, it's STILL used a LOT.


It's pretty obvious to anybody who's used either the iPod Touch or the iPhone why neither ships with a JVM: it would either suck, or require massive amounts of engineering resources in order to make it not suck.

Apple doesn't tend to just throw ugly stuff into their products because a portion of the potential market finds it essential: if you go down that route, you end up being Microsoft, or any Linux vendor, or random phone manufacturer.

If you're in that segment, Apple doesn't begrudge the fact that its product doesn't suit your needs—and expects the same courtesy in reverse. Lots and lots of people are happy with the iPhone that doesn't do 3G, can't send MMSes (I don't actually know the last time I or anybody I know sent or received one, for example), doesn't do Java, and so forth. Lots of people wouldn't be happy with that, so didn't buy it. There is no debate, or locking of horns—or rather, no need for one. I have a Volkswagen, but it doesn't mean that I need to write articles about why I didn't buy a Toyota, and people would think it a bit odd if I did.

There is a third group of people, of course: those who bought the product and then complain that it doesn't do the things that nobody said it would in the first place. Those people are just idiots, though, and are welcome to gripe to each other from here until eternity about how their laptop doesn't make their morning coffee and why their car doesn't drive itself along the morning commute.

Seriously, if you bought an iPhone, it's a pretty safe bet that you knew what it could or couldn't do beforehand and there's a very high probability of you being very happy with it. If you didn't buy one, there's probably a very good reason for it, and I hope you're just as happy as the guy who did buy the iPhone. If people want a platform for lamenting about the things Apple has or hasn't done with its product… well, you're just like every other Apple follower now.

Welcome to the party.

Reply Score: 2

Great phone, but not for me
by moleskine on Wed 21st Nov 2007 23:22 UTC
moleskine
Member since:
2005-11-05

It's the screen, stupid - to borrow a phrase. The computer and the screen become one. No more awkward buttons and switches. This is hardly a new paradigm but it's the first time it's been done reasonably right. On its own, fairly limited terms, it works very well and so Apple have shown up the rest of the mobile industry for producing too many kludgy, dodgy, unreliable handsets that are all about doing well by the industry and sod the consumer.

Like the author, I wouldn't buy an iPhone, preferring a basic but very solid phone that is good at one thing: making phone calls. I did Apple for most of the 90s and would never willingly submit to King Steve's questionable spells and obession with lock-in again. And where I live, in the UK, folks are used to either buying a phone without the airtime on pay-as-you-go or buying the airtime on contract with the phone thrown in for free. Since Apple want folks to pay for both, and pay a great deal, they probably aren't going to do all that well here, at least initially. Still, it would be churlish to pretend that this product hasn't broken the mould. No more nice, cosy deals for the Nokias of this world with their crappy cameras, buggy software and under-performing batteries. That must be good for us all.

Reply Score: 2

Raises some interesting points
by kaiwai on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 05:04 UTC
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

And for me, I'm not going to get an iPhone; even when Germany and France pry open the closed nature to allow unlocked phones.

Lets look at it from this angle. I had an iPod 60gig model (Photo/Video), a great device, but decided to uprade. I headed down the road and I had sufficient money to purchase a iPod Touch if I so wished. I tried out the iPod Touch, and the iPod classic. When it boiled down to it, what did the 'iTouch' provide over the iPod? apart from a bigger screen and a few other nifty things - nothing much? For me, I don't watch video, I don't do photos - I just listen to music, so I treat my iPod as nothing more than a glorified Music player. I ultimately decided to go with the iPod Classic (80gig model).

Now, transpose that into the iPhone world. I have a Nokia 6165i phone, I send text messages and phone - I don't use an other functionality. So when faced with the iPhone, I question whether all those hyped features are actually worth it given my very basic feature set. Out of that, there are many out there like me, but the difference, they buy crap which they don't really need. What I question therefore is whether the iPhone has the resilience to keep growing given the troubled economic waters ahead, rising consumer debt, reducing house prices etc. etc.

When push comes to shove, will Apple truly have something that can compel customers to the iPhone. Take the iPhone web browsing; if it were to launch in New Zealand, we pay 3cents per 10 kilobytes - how will Apple, in that sort of climate justify the addition of a web browser given how expensive it would be to utilise the web browser on the given network?

Edited 2007-11-22 05:12

Reply Score: 1

Article tone
by shahid on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 05:10 UTC
shahid
Member since:
2007-09-22

Probably the most pointless and definitely the most pretentious article ever posted here.

Reply Score: 2

RE: It's not luck!
by affect on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 05:16 UTC
affect
Member since:
2006-09-27

Microsoft, via Ballmer, ranted about how expensive the iPhone is and tried to dismiss it just like the writer of this ranting article.

I find it bothersome when someone dismisses innovation rather than give a well-balanced critique. Sure the iPhone is not a geek's dream and doesn't have all the features in the world, but it does have some unique features that no other phone has. And it is an innovative product with mass-market appeal. When did microsoft last bring us an innovative and competently-made product like OSX, iPod, iPhone, ...?

See the connection now?

Edited 2007-11-22 05:17

Reply Score: 2

I don't...
by BlackTiger on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 08:30 UTC
BlackTiger
Member since:
2005-07-22

I don't really want to read why he doesn't really want one...

Such "reviews" are so boring...

Reply Score: 4

RE: I don't...
by l3v1 on Fri 23rd Nov 2007 07:21 UTC in reply to "I don't..."
l3v1 Member since:
2005-07-06

No, this one is not. He's just telling he doesn't want an iPhone because ... well, just because. There you have it ;)

Reply Score: 2

This Operating System News?
by Coxy on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 11:07 UTC
Coxy
Member since:
2006-07-01

Michael Reed won't be getting an iPhone?

Can't this kind of thing be written buy this guy on his blog? My Grandmother won't be getting one either, can she get an article published about why she's not getting one?

Edited 2007-11-22 11:10

Reply Score: 2

RE: This Operating System News?
by Soulbender on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 13:31 UTC in reply to "This Operating System News? "
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

My Grandmother won't be getting one either, can she get an article published about why she's not getting one?


Please, let her. I'm sure whatever she writes is going to be more interesting than this article.

Reply Score: 2

Honk! Honk!
by Weeman on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 19:04 UTC
Weeman
Member since:
2006-03-20

Someone on the first comment page said that on Windows Mobile you could change the way the phone works, but on the iPhone not.

That's not entirely true. Maybe it is not true at all. Case in point, the SpringBoard replacement SummerBoard. While it replicates the functionality while adding new things, someone could have aswell developed a whole different paradigm.

Having taken a look at the filesystem, even the phone functionality is consolidated in an application, so there's no reason why you can't completely change over the iPhone experience.

Reply Score: 1

Toot! Toot!
by Weeman on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 19:56 UTC
Weeman
Member since:
2006-03-20

Well, granted, one of the reasons I've bought that iPod Touch is that it has a nice screen and runs *nix. But that's more tech affinity than hype.

And hey, it helps a lot shutting down my Solaris machine via SSH when the evening is going to be spontaneously replanned while away.

Reply Score: 2

v Convergence Devices Aren't Converging...
by tomcat on Fri 23rd Nov 2007 00:58 UTC