Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 19th Mar 2008 10:37 UTC, submitted by Oliver
Geek stuff, sci-fi... Arthur C. Clarke, who peered into the heavens with a homemade telescope as a boy and grew up to become a visionary titan of science-fiction writing and collaborated with director Stanley Kubrick on the landmark film "2001: A Space Odyssey", has died. He was 90. The knighted British-born writer died early Wednesday in Colombo, Sri Lanka, where he had made his home for decades, after experiencing a cardio-respiratory attack, his secretary, Rohan De Silva, told Reuters. May he rest in peace, and I'd like to extend my sincere condolences to his family and friends. The pod-bay doors will open for the last time.
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Comment by Oliver
by Oliver on Wed 19th Mar 2008 11:00 UTC
Oliver
Member since:
2006-07-15

Rest in peace.

"One of the biggest roles of science fiction is to prepare people to accept the future without pain and to encourage a flexibility of mind. Politicians should read science fiction, not westerns and detective stories."

--Arthur C. Clarke

Edited 2008-03-19 11:01 UTC

Reply Score: 3

v RE: Comment by Oliver
by primelight@live.com on Wed 19th Mar 2008 15:37 UTC in reply to "Comment by Oliver"
RE[2]: Comment by Oliver
by sbergman27 on Wed 19th Mar 2008 15:52 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Oliver"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Primelight, please take this vendetta somewhere else. The quote you link to is extremely vague, not supported by the author with evidence in any way, and in such exceedingly poor taste that words fail me in describing the magnitude.

And please get a life, as well.

Sincerely,
Steve Bergman

Reply Score: 3

v RE[3]: Comment by Oliver
by primelight@live.com on Wed 19th Mar 2008 16:19 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Oliver"
RE[4]: Comment by Oliver
by sbergman27 on Wed 19th Mar 2008 16:48 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Oliver"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

You might have done a tiny bit of research, any at all, before making your slanderous accusations. Do you believe everything that people tell you that they read in the National Enquirer, as well?

http://www.scifi.com/sfw/issue63/news.html

"""
Science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke has vehemently denied a story in the sensationalist British newspaper The Sunday Mirror that claims Clarke is a pedophile. Earlier this week Clarke released a statement to the press that said, "the accusations are such nonsense that I have found it difficult to treat them with the contempt that they deserve." He added, "I categorically state that The Sunday Mirror's article is grossly defamatory and contains statements which in themselves and by innuendo are quite false, grossly inaccurate and extremely harmful."
"""

The Sunday Mirror is the Sunday version of this tabloid:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sunday_Mirror

Edited 2008-03-19 16:52 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Oliver
by Oliver on Wed 19th Mar 2008 17:45 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Oliver"
Oliver Member since:
2006-07-15

Badmouthing dead people without real proof is just inhuman. The British *tabloid* The Sunday Mirror spread this 'information', it was a newspaper hoax in the end.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Oliver
by JMcCarthy on Wed 19th Mar 2008 19:04 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Oliver"
JMcCarthy Member since:
2005-08-12

What kind of moron condemns someone based on hearsay?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Oliver
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 19th Mar 2008 19:21 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Oliver"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Rest in hell.


"One judges an artist not by his lifestyle, character, or actions, but by his art."

One of the the most important lessons I've received (from my Dutch Literature teacher).

Reply Score: 1

v RE[3]: Comment by Oliver
by primelight@live.com on Wed 19th Mar 2008 19:31 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Oliver"
RE[4]: Comment by Oliver
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 19th Mar 2008 20:56 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Oliver"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

So you are OK with possible child abuse as long as good art is produced?


Don't twist my words - I'm not approving of child abuse. All I'm saying is that someone's personal lifestyle, or wrongdoings, have no influence in my appreciation for that person's art.

If Hitler was actually a good painter (instead of the crappy one he was) and produced good art, I'd still say it was good art, despite his horrendous crimes.

UPDATE: Oops, I wrote it the wrong way in that comment. What I meant was: "One judges art not by the artist that made it, but by the art itself."

Hope that clears it up.

Edited 2008-03-19 20:58 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by Oliver
by h3rman on Wed 19th Mar 2008 21:33 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Oliver"
h3rman Member since:
2006-08-09

If Hitler was actually a good painter (instead of the crappy one he was) and produced good art, I'd still say it was good art, despite his horrendous crimes.


Except that that's purely hypothetical.

A good tree cannot bear bad fruit,
nor can a bad tree bear good fruit.

:)

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Oliver
by Quag7 on Thu 20th Mar 2008 03:12 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Oliver"
Quag7 Member since:
2005-07-28

"Rest in hell" - wasn't that a Chuck Norris line before he trashed a whole mess of bozos in that one movie?

Anyway, for anyone who cares:

---

http://www.thelastoutpost.com/site/1456/default.aspx

On February 1st 1998, a British Tabloid newspaper (The Sunday Mirror) reported that Clarke, then a recent candidate for knighthood, was a pedophile and was living in Sri Lanka in order to facilitate that lifestyle. The Mirror article quoted a supposed interview with Clarke: "Once they have reached the age of puberty, it is OK... It doesn't do any harm. and "I am trying to think of the youngest boy I have ever had because, of course, you can't tell it here. I think most of the damage comes from the fuss made by hysterical parents afterwards. If the kids don't mind, fair enough.". The newspaper account also claimed that Clarke had links to well-known pedophile rings operating in Britain and Europe

On February 3rd 1998, Clarke issued a statement denying the charges and asked for a postponement of his knighthood ceremony. He said that having always had a particular dislike of pedophiles, few charges could be more revolting to him than to be classed as one. Clarke said that he had not been sexually active in 20 years, and that the reports were "nonsense, contemptuous and revolting". He also declined to speak with the media "on legal advice".to him than to be classed as one. Clarke said that he had not been sexually active in 20 years, and that the reports were "nonsense, contemptuous and revolting". He also declined to speak with the media "on legal advice".

---

I would also add, that this is the website for the paper that this quote appeared in. Draw your own conclusions. I'm sure people in the UK are more than familiar with this paper, but maybe not those who aren't in the UK.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/

None of this is going to change the fact that 2001: A Space Odyssey blew my mind and, having seen it as a young age, probably impacted the way in which I view the world significantly, at least in scale. I am sad that he is dead.

Edited 2008-03-20 03:13 UTC

Reply Score: 2

burnttoy
Member since:
2006-07-28

"Any suitably advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic"... and it's true - do people know (or even care) how the international networks of computers and phones operate? Noop... it's a good as magic!

Reply Score: 3

RIP
by astroraptor on Wed 19th Mar 2008 12:15 UTC
astroraptor
Member since:
2005-07-22

Strangely enough, I thought he had died years ago. Maybe I'm thinking of someone else. :|

Reply Score: 1

RE: RIP
by Gryzor on Thu 20th Mar 2008 12:11 UTC in reply to "RIP"
Gryzor Member since:
2005-07-03

Maybe you were thinking of Stanley Kubrik?

Reply Score: 2

RIP!
by Gryzor on Wed 19th Mar 2008 12:23 UTC
Gryzor
Member since:
2005-07-03

"ALL THESE WORLDS ARE YOURS, EXCEPT EUROPA. ATTEMPT NO LANDINGS THERE. USE THEM TOGETHER. USE THEM IN PEACE" (From the MOVIE 2001 A Space Odisey)

:)

Reply Score: 2

RE: RIP!
by Phloptical on Thu 20th Mar 2008 00:05 UTC in reply to "RIP!"
Phloptical Member since:
2006-10-10

Actually, it was from 2010....but nice quote anyway.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: RIP!
by Gryzor on Thu 20th Mar 2008 00:10 UTC in reply to "RE: RIP!"
Gryzor Member since:
2005-07-03

Yes, you're right. It was in 2010. Curiously in the book the part "use them togheter. Use them in peace" doesn't exist. :S

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: RIP!
by Phloptical on Thu 20th Mar 2008 00:27 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: RIP!"
Phloptical Member since:
2006-10-10

Really? I didn't read the book. Probably better than the movie. I did read 2056, though. That was pretty cool. Good enough for me to read twice, back to back.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: RIP!
by Gryzor on Thu 20th Mar 2008 00:39 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: RIP!"
Gryzor Member since:
2005-07-03

Alas the third book is 2068 ;) and the last is 3001.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: RIP!
by sbergman27 on Thu 20th Mar 2008 03:47 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: RIP!"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Alas the third book is 2068 ;)


2061

I thought that one was a bit boring. But it would have been even more so if they'd really been 7 years late and the comet had already gone. :-)

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: RIP!
by Gryzor on Thu 20th Mar 2008 12:09 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: RIP!"
Gryzor Member since:
2005-07-03


2061
I thought that one was a bit boring. But it would have been even more so if they'd really been 7 years late and the comet had already gone. :-)


LOL You're entirely right. I gotta re-read 'em all, it's been sooo long ago…

Here's the complete serie:
2001 - A Space Odissey
2010 - The Year we Made contact
2061 - The Third Odyssey
3001 - The Final Odyssey

And I remember that in 2061 they used Halley Comet... yes! It was about them landing on Europa and being rescued. I read it like 20 years ago. :S Must re-read, Must re-read ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: RIP!
by Phloptical on Thu 20th Mar 2008 21:37 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: RIP!"
Phloptical Member since:
2006-10-10

Yeah, 2061, 56, 68...one of those. It was the story that had Jupiter turn back to a planet, if I remember correctly. They landed on Europa and pissed the aliens off. It was probably over 15 years ago that I read it.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: RIP!
by Gryzor on Thu 20th Mar 2008 23:51 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: RIP!"
Gryzor Member since:
2005-07-03

Well it's a complex story that mixes strange stuff ;) A "giant" diamond grows on Europa... yeah. It was a boring book, but nice anyways ;)

Reply Score: 2

RAMA
by yanik on Wed 19th Mar 2008 12:26 UTC
yanik
Member since:
2005-07-13

What a coincidence, I'm reading Rendez-vous with Rama right now, and I love it.

RIP Clarke.

Reply Score: 2

RIP
by merkoth on Wed 19th Mar 2008 13:14 UTC
merkoth
Member since:
2006-09-22

This is a sad day, have a peaceful trip Mr. Clarke.

See you at the stars.

Reply Score: 3

First Gygax
by eggs on Wed 19th Mar 2008 14:16 UTC
eggs
Member since:
2006-01-23

then Clarke? It has been a sad few weeks for geeks ;)

Reply Score: 2

We are all children of stardust ...
by mind!dagger on Wed 19th Mar 2008 14:16 UTC
mind!dagger
Member since:
2007-06-26

All the greats are passing their energy into the cosmos. Authur C. Clarke, John Stewart "Jack" Williamson, Gary Ernest Gygax, Carl Sagan.

We are all children of stardust, it's just a matter of time before Sol reclaims its children and then scatters us back into infinity.

Reply Score: 3

"My God, it's full of stars!"
by SamAskani on Wed 19th Mar 2008 15:01 UTC
SamAskani
Member since:
2006-01-03

Just as Dave Bowman's last words.

By far 2001: A Space Odyssey is one of my all-time favorites books and the movie that I have re-watched the most. At least 12 times.

RIP

Reply Score: 1

My choice as leader in FreeCiv...
by JacobMunoz on Wed 19th Mar 2008 15:19 UTC
JacobMunoz
Member since:
2006-03-17

I've found myself choosing the "Martians" as my nation, and he's my preferred leader. I don't know why, I just seem to have better luck when I choose him.

Sad to hear this. Martians, march on!

Reply Score: 1

The Fountains of Paradise
by sbergman27 on Wed 19th Mar 2008 15:42 UTC
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

I'll have to dig up my old copy of "The Fountains of Paradise" to reread in honor. It seems appropriate.

Some authors remain with us always. It's been 16 years, and I still miss Isaac Asimov very much.

Reply Score: 2

The Last Theorem
by sbergman27 on Wed 19th Mar 2008 17:05 UTC
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

Great authors enjoy an odd sort of immortality. They don't die. They just fade away.

He has a new book coming out. :-)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_Theorem

Reply Score: 3

What a sad day!
by red_devel on Wed 19th Mar 2008 18:01 UTC
red_devel
Member since:
2006-03-30

I can honestly say that I would probably not be an Aerospace Engineer today if I hadn't become incurably addicted to Mr. Clarke's writing in High School. His science fiction, having a fairly solid root in reality and generally staying confined within the actual limits of physics, was incredibly awe inspiring. I absolutely HAD to be a part of that stuff.

I can't imagine I'm the only person for whom that is the case. I think A.C.C. has a huge legacy of people who were inspired to pursue science and engineering by his work. I think thats what he would have wanted; knowing that the world is closer to accomplishing the things he dreamed about because of his contributions. RIP, Mr. Clarke.

Reply Score: 2

The Man
by 2501 on Wed 19th Mar 2008 21:21 UTC
2501
Member since:
2005-07-14

Rest in peace.

I read 2001 when I was in college getting my BS in Mathematics and it helped to have a different understanding of the world around me. Also, I found out later that he invented the communication by satellite which I think it is one of the best invention of the modern world.

For me he was a genius, a visionary and a good man. God bless you.

-2501

Reply Score: 1

Arthur C. Clarke -- Predicitions
by 2501 on Wed 19th Mar 2008 21:24 UTC
2501
Member since:
2005-07-14

Nice article he wrote about his predictions.

-2501

------------

Beyond 2001
Reader's Digest
February 2001

Sir Arthur C. Clarke:

No one can see into the future. What I try to do is outline possible "futures" - although totally expected inventions or events can render predictions absurd after only a few years. The classic example is the statement, made in the late 1940s, by the then chairman of IBM that the world market for computers was five. I have more than that in my own office.

Perhaps I am in no position to criticise: in 1971 I predicted the first Mars Landing in 1994; now we'll be lucky if we make it by 2010. On the other hand, I thought I was being wildly optimistic in 1951 by suggesting a mission to the moon in 1978. Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin beat me by almost a decade.

Still, I take pride in the fact that communications satellites are placed exactly where I suggested in 1945, and the name "Clarke Orbit" is often used (if only because it's easier to say than "geostationary orbit").

Some of the event listed here, particularly the space missions, are already scheduled. I believe all the other events could happen, although several, I hope, will not. Check me for accuracy - on December 31, 2100.

2001 Cassini space probe (launched 1997) begins exploration of Saturn's moons and rings. Galileo probe (launched 1989) continues surveying Jupiter and its moons. Life beneath the ice-covered oceans of one moon, Europa, appears likely.

2002 The first commercial device producing clean, safe power by low-temperate nuclear reactions goes on the market, heralding the end of the Fossil Fuel Age.

2003 The motor industry is given five years to replace all fuel-burning engines with the new energy device. The same year, NASA's robot Mars Surveyor is launched.

2004 First (publicly admitted) human clone.

2005 First sample sent back to Earth by Mars Surveyor.

2006 Last coal mine closed.

2008 A city in a developing country is devastated by the accidental detonation of an atomic bomb in its armoury. After a brief debate in the United Nations, all nuclear weapons are destroyed.

2009 The first quantum generators (tapping space energy) are developed. Available in portable and household units, from a few kilowatts upwards, they can produce electricity indefinitely. Central power stations close down: the age of pylons ends.

Electronic monitoring virtually phases out professional criminals.

2011 Largest living animal filmed: a 76-metre octopus in the Mariana Trench. By coincidence, even larger creatures are then discovered when the first robot probes drill through the ice of Europa.

2012 Aerospace-planes enter commercial service.

2013 Prince Harry becomes the first member of the British royal family to fly in space.

2014 Construction of Hilton Orbiter Hotel begins by converting the giant shuttle tanks previously allowed to fall back to Earth.

2015 An inevitable by-product of the quantum generator is complete control of matter at the atomic level. Within a few years, because they are more useful, lead and copper cost twice as much as gold.

2016 Existing currencies are abolished. The "mega-watt-hour" becomes the universal unit of exchange.

2017 On his hundred birthday, December 16, Sir Arthur C. Clarke is one of the first guests in the Hilton Orbiter.

2019 A major meteor impact occurs on the north polar ice cap. The resulting tsunamis cause considerable damage along the coasts of Greeland and Canada. The long-discussed "Project Spaceguard," to identify and deflect potentially dangerous comets or asteroids, is finally activated.

2020 Artificial Intelligence reaches human level. From now on there are two intelligent species on Earth.

2021 The first humans land on Mars.

2023 Dinosaur facsimiles are cloned from computer-generated DNA.

2024 Infrared signals are detected coming from the centre of the Galaxy, obviously the product of a technologically advanced civilisation. All attempts to decipher them fail.

2025 Neurological research finally leads to an understanding of all the senses, and direct input becomes possible, bypassing ears, eyes, skin, etc. The result is the metal "Braincap." Anyone wearing this close-fitting helmet can enter a whole universe of experience, real or imaginary.

The Braincap is a boon to doctors, who can now experience their patients' symptoms (suitable attenuated). It also revolutionises the legal profession, as deliberate lying is now impossible.

2040 The "Universal Replicator," based on nanotechnology, is perfected: any object, however complex, can be created - given the necessary raw materials. Diamonds or gourmet meals can, literally, be made from dirt.

As a result, agriculture and industry are phased out - along with work. There is an explosion in the arts, entertainment and education. Hunter-gathere societies are deliberately recreated, with huge areas of the planet allowed to revert to their natural state.

2045 The totally self-contained mobile home (envisaged almost a century ago by Buckminster Fuller) is perfected. Any additional carbon needed from food synthesis is obtained by extracting carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

2050 Bored in this era, millions decide to use cryonic suspension to emigrate into the future in search of adventure.

2057 On October 4, the centenary of Sputnik 1, the dawn of the space age is celebrated by humans on Earth, the Moon, Mars, Europa, Ganymede and Titan, and in orbit around Venus, Neptune and Pluto.

2061 Halley's Comet returns - first landing by humans, And the sensational discovery of both dormant and active life forms vindicates Wickramasinghe and Hoyle's century-old hypothesis that life exists through space.

2090 Burning of fossil fuels is resumed to replace carbon dioxide "mined" from the air and to try to postpone the next Ice Age by promoting global warming.

2095 The development of a "Space Drive" - a propulsion system reacting against the structure of space-time - makes the rocket obsolete and permits velocities close to that of light. Human explorers set off to nearby star systems.

2100 History begins...

Reply Score: 1

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

I started to reply that the 2017 prediction has turned out to have been a tad optimistic. But then I remembered that with science fiction authors, anything is possible. I guess I'll have to wait another 10 years to see if he somehow shows up. And if he does, I really hope he brings Isaac with him. ;-)

Edited 2008-03-19 22:46 UTC

Reply Score: 3

he was not a pedophile
by unclefester on Wed 19th Mar 2008 23:12 UTC
unclefester
Member since:
2007-01-13

The racist Sri Lankan government deported all foreigners. Clarke was the last one remaining. The created a smear campaign to get rid of him. End of story.

Reply Score: 1

Last interview
by sergiusens on Thu 20th Mar 2008 18:47 UTC
sergiusens
Member since:
2007-09-01
See you again soon...
by Chreo on Fri 21st Mar 2008 13:26 UTC
Chreo
Member since:
2005-07-06

AC Clarke's writings caused me to study science. I know of no other author that has had such a profound effect on me even though others has caused me to change my thinking or ways. Thank you for showing me a way to put my curiosity to use.

Reply Score: 1