Linked by Tony Steidler-Dennison on Tue 8th Jul 2008 12:11 UTC, submitted by LostAirman
Legal The way the Internet is set up now, an I.P. address, by itself, doesn't identify an individual user. But an I.P. address can be traced to a specific Internet service provider, and with a subpoena, the Internet provider can be forced to identify which of their customers was assigned a particular I.P. address at a particular time. That is how the recording industry has been identifying and suing people who use file sharing programs.
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I.P. ?
by trenchsol on Tue 8th Jul 2008 13:32 UTC
trenchsol
Member since:
2006-12-07

I have never heard of someone calling IP address an "I.P. address". It might even be grammatically correct, but it's very unusual.

DG

Reply Score: 4

Id like to know...
by FunkyELF on Tue 8th Jul 2008 14:05 UTC
FunkyELF
Member since:
2006-07-26

I'd like to know if there is a list of ISP's track records with cooperating with the RIAA MPAA.

Like ones that will give it up if they just ask, or ones that will wait for an actual subpoena, or ones that will actually fight and protect the rights of their customers.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Id like to know...
by phoudoin on Tue 8th Jul 2008 14:31 UTC in reply to "Id like to know..."
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

I'll bet that it wont take long before we start to see power users using pseudo-anonymous technologies like I2P, TOR or ANTS networks and the like. Plus encrypted exchanges.

Which in the end will be counter-productive for the music/movie industries but, unfortunatly, the far more important fight against pedophily networks, drugs and other dangerous organization using the Net.

All to protect an anchronic physical-media business model that worked only because duplication had a cost, which made every item far rarer than its digital immaterial version.

Mission accomplished, guys.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Id like to know...
by FunkyELF on Tue 8th Jul 2008 15:25 UTC in reply to "RE: Id like to know..."
FunkyELF Member since:
2006-07-26

Which in the end will be counter-productive for the music/movie industries but, unfortunatly, the far more important fight against pedophily networks, drugs and other dangerous organization using the Net.


A lot of those guys dealing with that kind of stuff are pretty dumb and don't know about anonymity. They use IRC, AOL chat rooms, and usenet. Now, thanks to the RIAA and MPAA, technology like tor, bittorrent, and others are going to become mainstream and these creapy pedophiles are going to start using it.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Id like to know...
by phoudoin on Tue 8th Jul 2008 15:50 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Id like to know..."
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

My point, exactly.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Id like to know...
by phoudoin on Tue 8th Jul 2008 15:51 UTC in reply to "RE: Id like to know..."
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

anachronic, sorry.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Id like to know...
by Michael on Tue 8th Jul 2008 22:40 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Id like to know..."
Michael Member since:
2005-07-01

I think you meant anachronistic actually, in the sense of belonging to another time.

You're quite right anyway. Though I suspect the effort required to secure oneself would put off the casual user. Tor gets a lot of coverage but never feels like it's about to "take off" and become mainstream.

Reply Score: 2

Theft is theft but
by jefro on Tue 8th Jul 2008 21:22 UTC
jefro
Member since:
2007-04-13

Shame other types of internet crimes don't seem to get investigated. Bunch of crooks out there doing all sorts of bad stuff that need to be behind bars or better.

Reply Score: 2