Linked by Amjith Ramanujam on Tue 29th Jul 2008 18:33 UTC, submitted by Kaj de Vos
Syllable, AtheOS The Syllable project has reached another long-time milestone. It was always planned to factor out the web rendering engine of its web browser, ABrowse, into a library with a native Syllable View widget on top, so it can be embedded into more applications than just a web browser. Kristian Van Der Vliet did just that: building on Arno Klenke's WebCore port, he updated that and then stepped up the modularisation by creating the WebView class. He rewrote the browser on top of that and named it Webster [screenshot]. The first alpha version is available in the project's applications downloads. The latest Syllable 0.6.6 development build is required to run it, as several bugs in the system were fixed for the new browser. The next development build will have Webster included. The source code is available on the development site.
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The next step?
by cipri on Tue 29th Jul 2008 19:16 UTC
cipri
Member since:
2007-02-15

Perhaps the next step should be the integration of gnash into webster. Does that mean, that a "SDL View" is required? As far as I know, it is only possible to create an "SDL Window".

Reply Score: 2

RE: The next step?
by Vanders on Tue 29th Jul 2008 19:47 UTC in reply to "The next step?"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

There are a lot of steps in between, not least of which is writing the Syllable platform support for plugins in WebCore. You also can't have an SDL view running inside a "real" Syllable application, so we'll have to port Gnash to Syllable as a native port before we can create a plugin for Webster.

Reply Score: 6

Haiku
by Earl C Pottinger on Tue 29th Jul 2008 20:54 UTC
Earl C Pottinger
Member since:
2008-07-12

Sounds like something the Haiku team should keep a close eye on to see how well it works out.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Haiku
by Tanner on Tue 29th Jul 2008 21:08 UTC in reply to "Haiku"
Tanner Member since:
2005-07-06

Nice achievement!
Keep up the good work, I'm following Syllable and Haiku for a really long time... One day I will switch from Linux to one of this two oses.

Reply Score: 3

Fork or improvement?
by renox on Tue 29th Jul 2008 21:31 UTC
renox
Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm not sure I understand: what is the status of this 'webview class': was-it an improvement which has been added to WebKit or is-it a fork?

Maintaining a fork of WebKit is likely to be a highly time consuming task!

Reply Score: 2

RE: Fork or improvement?
by Vanders on Tue 29th Jul 2008 21:40 UTC in reply to "Fork or improvement?"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm not sure I understand: what is the status of this 'webview class': was-it an improvement which has been added to WebKit or is-it a fork?


WebView is a library that implements a series of native Syllable classes on top of WebCore which can be used by applications to render and control a "web view".

Maintaining a fork of WebKit is likely to be a highly time consuming task!


Yes, it would be. Simply maintaining our port is plenty enough as it is.

I understand why you're confused. To clarify, "WebKit" is two things. It is the collection of components such as WebCore & JavaScriptCore which make up the browser engine, and it is a library on top of those components which provides the API for applications to use.

However WebKit the library is not actually a fixed, solid entity: it naturally has to be specific to each platform, so for instance on OS X it is an Objective C API. So you can in fact get the entire engine without "porting" WebKit, which would really involve writing an entire version of WebKit for your platform anyway. So instead WebView is a much more simple API that does the same job that WebKit does on other platforms.

Edited 2008-07-29 21:42 UTC

Reply Score: 9

v Awesome...
by tomcat on Wed 30th Jul 2008 06:20 UTC
RE: Awesome...
by fithisux on Wed 30th Jul 2008 07:38 UTC in reply to "Awesome..."
fithisux Member since:
2006-01-22

Syllable is not microsoft in terms of slaves.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Awesome...
by Vanders on Wed 30th Jul 2008 08:10 UTC in reply to "Awesome..."
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

Imagine, I'm not Microsoft, and no one compared Webster to IE except you.

Go troll some place else.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Awesome...
by testadura on Wed 30th Jul 2008 09:44 UTC in reply to "Awesome..."
testadura Member since:
2006-04-14

And there will be numerous other milestones for Syllable that were achieved (hacked;-)) years ago by MS.

There's always room for improvement (in this case a lot). What's your point?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Awesome...
by phoudoin on Wed 30th Jul 2008 14:02 UTC in reply to "Awesome..."
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

What a great comment.

Silverberg's Internet Explorer team sized around 100 by 1996 (IE3), probably over 400 the next year (IE4) to reach 1000 by 1999 (IE5).

Comparing a full time money-backed team of 400 1997's achievement to a part time will-backed team of 1 2008's achievement... oh yeah, make so MUCH sense.

Congrats.

Reply Score: 4

Name clash
by torbenm on Wed 30th Jul 2008 09:59 UTC
torbenm
Member since:
2007-04-23

Webster is also the name of a browser for RISC OS: http://www.arsvcs.demon.co.uk/webster/

Having two quite distinct browsers with the same name is bit confusing, so I think a rename would be in order.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Name clash
by Vanders on Wed 30th Jul 2008 10:23 UTC in reply to "Name clash"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

The RiscOS browser appears to be called "WebsterXL", not "Webster".

It's pretty much impossible to come up with a name that hasn't been used someplace else at some point by another project, sadly.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Name clash
by torbenm on Thu 31st Jul 2008 07:57 UTC in reply to "RE: Name clash"
torbenm Member since:
2007-04-23

The latest version is indeed called Webster XL, but the product line and the original browser name is just plain Webster.

And, yes, it may be difficult finding a name that hasn't been used somewhere before. But there are not so many different browsers around that it should be a real problem. And a Google search on"Webster browser" would reveal that it is not only the name of a browser for RISC OS but also an add-on for Internet Explorer. Who these days do not do a Google search before deciding on a name for a new product?

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Name clash
by Vanders on Thu 31st Jul 2008 09:00 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Name clash"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

Who these days do not do a Google search before deciding on a name for a new product?


I don't, because it's of little consequence and frankly, a huge pain in the backside that detracts from the actual job of getting things done.

As you said yourself, the RISC OS browser is called "Webster XL" and the name is already overloaded anyway, so one more application with the name "Webster" that's tied to a single platform is not going to harm anyone.

Reply Score: 3