Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 2nd Dec 2008 18:45 UTC
Red Hat Red Hat's Spacewalk project is getting into place. The project wants to feed development of the Red Hat Network Satellite product for system management. Satellite is a critical tool for Red Hat users as it provides management capabilities for multiple servers for software deployment and updates. Almost six months ago, Red Hat kicked off the Spacewalk project in an effort to create an open source version of Network Satellite that would serve as the upstream project that drives development. According to Red Hat executives, Spacewalk is still in the process of getting aligned with Network Satellite releases in terms of the development model. As well, Spacewalk is now gearing up to replace Network Satellite's proprietary Oracle database backend with an open source database. It's all part of Red Hat's larger efforts to use the open source model effectively in all parts of its business, as well as reducing the costs associated with proprietary databases.
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nice
by poundsmack on Tue 2nd Dec 2008 18:58 UTC
poundsmack
Member since:
2005-07-13

I dont care what anyone says about how much other companies contribute and what they contribute, but Red Hat really steps up to the plate and delivers. Keep the good stuff comming Red Hat, keep it comming.

Reply Score: 7

RE: nice
by Bitterman on Tue 2nd Dec 2008 21:12 UTC in reply to "nice"
Bitterman Member since:
2005-07-06

This is why i use Fedora and Redhat. Keep doing what you guys do eventually people will see where their bread is buttered.

Reply Score: 2

awesome!
by 2501 on Tue 2nd Dec 2008 21:48 UTC
2501
Member since:
2005-07-14

Redhat is always exceeding .... Fedora 10 rules!

Reply Score: 2

GO RH
by spikeb on Tue 2nd Dec 2008 22:25 UTC
spikeb
Member since:
2006-01-18

redhat already uses very little proprietary software, getting rid of what is there is great

Reply Score: 3

Red Hat has survived
by centos_user on Tue 2nd Dec 2008 23:58 UTC
centos_user
Member since:
2008-11-16

I started out with Red Hat 6.0 Professional when you could call a 1-800 number for support up to 30 days.

However, a hobby turned into a career in which I would have never guessed after years of not knowing what I was doing would lead to getting Red Hat Certifications and learning the core of the OS.

Fedora 10 is really nice, in fact I am running it on my Dell XPS M1530, but I run CentOS on other boxes and will be waiting for the release of RHEL6 which will be next year.

Red Hat has really shined when the giants in the software industry were trying to bring them down.

It is amazing how 'free software' has turned out to be a primary choice for the Enterprise. I would have had no idea over 10 years ago, that working with Red Hat Linux would be a daily job function.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Red Hat has survived
by 2501 on Wed 3rd Dec 2008 00:33 UTC in reply to "Red Hat has survived"
2501 Member since:
2005-07-14

I envy you!

I have a Dell Inspiron 600m + Fedora 10 and it works like a charm. I am using it to write Fortran programs and I have no complains...even my wife likes it. :-)

-t

Reply Score: 1

RE: Red Hat has survived
by diegoviola on Wed 3rd Dec 2008 04:03 UTC in reply to "Red Hat has survived"
diegoviola Member since:
2006-08-15

I started out with Red Hat 6.0 Professional when you could call a 1-800 number for support up to 30 days.

However, a hobby turned into a career in which I would have never guessed after years of not knowing what I was doing would lead to getting Red Hat Certifications and learning the core of the OS.

Fedora 10 is really nice, in fact I am running it on my Dell XPS M1530, but I run CentOS on other boxes and will be waiting for the release of RHEL6 which will be next year.

Red Hat has really shined when the giants in the software industry were trying to bring them down.

It is amazing how 'free software' has turned out to be a primary choice for the Enterprise. I would have had no idea over 10 years ago, that working with Red Hat Linux would be a daily job function.


What wireless chipset does your XPS M1530 have? Mine come with a broadcom and having to use ndiswrapper sucks ;) .

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Red Hat has survived
by binarymutant on Wed 3rd Dec 2008 07:22 UTC in reply to "RE: Red Hat has survived"
binarymutant Member since:
2008-11-11

having to use ndiswrapper sucks
you should try the native drivers, b43, they might work

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Red Hat has survived
by diegoviola on Wed 3rd Dec 2008 16:12 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Red Hat has survived"
diegoviola Member since:
2006-08-15

having to use ndiswrapper sucks
you should try the native drivers, b43, they might work


The b43 doesn't work for the device I have AFAIK.

"If you have an USB device with Broadcom chip, please try the RNDIS driver. The b43/b43legacy driver will never support this device."

http://linuxwireless.org/en/users/Drivers/b43

:(

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Red Hat has survived
by TechGeek on Wed 3rd Dec 2008 17:52 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Red Hat has survived"
TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

Honestly, the best answer is replace the card (mini-pci probably) with an Intel one. You can find one cheap on ebay and they have great support in Linux.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Red Hat has survived
by diegoviola on Wed 3rd Dec 2008 22:15 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Red Hat has survived"
diegoviola Member since:
2006-08-15

Honestly, the best answer is replace the card (mini-pci probably) with an Intel one. You can find one cheap on ebay and they have great support in Linux.


Would this work?

http://www.amazon.com/Wireless-Wifi-Link-Mini-Card/dp/B000QAY00K/re...

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Red Hat has survived
by TechGeek on Thu 4th Dec 2008 01:19 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Red Hat has survived"
TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

It should. Looks like a b/g/n wifi card. I would check your current card to make sure the connector end is the same. If it is I don't see why it wouldn't work. That card has three antennae hook ups, one for each band. Your laptop may only have one or two antennae, so you need to make sure you hook them up for the bands you will be using. Probably only the b band or g band.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Red Hat has survived
by diegoviola on Thu 4th Dec 2008 01:21 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Red Hat has survived"
diegoviola Member since:
2006-08-15

It should. Looks like a b/g/n wifi card. I would check your current card to make sure the connector end is the same. If it is I don't see why it wouldn't work. That card has three antennae hook ups, one for each band. Your laptop may only have one or two antennae, so you need to make sure you hook them up for the bands you will be using. Probably only the b band or g band.


Ok, I bought this:

"IntelĀ® WiFi Link 5300"

http://www.intel.com/network/connectivity/products/wireless/adapter...

Thanks a lot for your help ;)

Edited 2008-12-04 01:21 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Red Hat has survived
by centos_user on Wed 3rd Dec 2008 13:37 UTC in reply to "RE: Red Hat has survived"
centos_user Member since:
2008-11-16

Let me check it out, I would have loaded CentOS 5.2 however the network card would not work with the kernel or it would have taken putting in another kernel and lots of headaches.

I like the Dell XPS, mine has the 1920x1200 display and 7200 rpm hard-drive.

The VPN works like a charm in NetworkManager I am quite impressed with this tool.

Reply Score: 1