Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 2nd Jan 2009 22:06 UTC
Google Netbooks run either Windows or Linux, and both are readily available in shops all over the world. The Linux variants chosen by several netbook manufacturers are usually derived from desktop distributions, and obviously, Windows is a desktop operating system as well. However, netbooks have small displays, and both Windows and GNOME/KDE and some of their applications aren't always suited well for such an environment. Enter Android, Google's Linux-based phone operating system. It is suggested that Android-based netbooks will appear on the market in 2010, maybe even sooner.
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specs going up
by evert on Fri 2nd Jan 2009 22:35 UTC
evert
Member since:
2005-07-06

I agree that existing desktop-oriented distros are a beter fit for the Eee PC. I own a 1000H and have Windows XP running it. Screen resolution is no problem - the 1000H has a higher resolution than earlier models.

This is probably improving further. Screen resolutions will improve, so the reason to use android will become void.

Having Linux on the Eee PC is definitely an advantage. I would love to, once a replacement for Outlook is available. (Current "replacements" do not even come close.) Full hard disk encryption is also important. I currently use truecrypt, and it's slowing down startup times somewhat. This is unavoidable. But an Ubuntu distro with only /home encrypted would start up faster. Windows needs a full disk encryption because the way it manages it's files...

Reply Score: 1

RE: specs going up
by Moredhas on Sat 3rd Jan 2009 03:03 UTC in reply to "specs going up"
Moredhas Member since:
2008-04-10

Out of curiosity, what makes Outlook so special? Where do Thunderbird and Evolution fall short? How about KMail? I was never a fan out Outlook when I was using Windows, so I'm just not too sure about the differences. To me, an email client is an email client - I can use Thunderbird for emails and RSS, and I don't need anything more (though I've barely scratched the surface of what Thuderbird can do).

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: specs going up
by evert on Sat 3rd Jan 2009 03:45 UTC in reply to "RE: specs going up"
evert Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm not using it for email. Thunderbird handles my email much better than Outlook. Outlook has some problems with IMAP so I prefer TB.

But calendaring is another story. I like calendar syncing to all my devices. I want to work offline and sync later. I want to use tables, links, colors, fonts, and so on in my appointments. I even like to copy pictures or route maps to my appointments, and attach letters and so on. I mean, real attachments, not links to files. So when I attach a file, I can open that file on all computers where outlook is installed, or where I can access my Web Outlook using the Exchange server. I just like the offline mode, the syncing, the possibility to attach files and rich text to appointments, and the compatibility with a lot of devices. iCal / sunbird / korganizer / horde do not do that yet (I tried them all).

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: specs going up
by Elv13 on Sat 3rd Jan 2009 05:28 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: specs going up"
Elv13 Member since:
2006-06-12

You should give Evolution a try, with some novell and redhat plugin, it does that very well. Some of my client got Ubuntu+palm treo+google cal and they work very well together.

TB3 will also improve calender support, until that, mozilla sunbird is there, it use the mozilla plugin system, so you can extend it at your will.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: specs going up
by raboof on Sat 3rd Jan 2009 21:04 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: specs going up"
raboof Member since:
2005-07-24

You should give Evolution a try, with some novell and redhat plugin, it does that very well.


AFAIK that will still only allow you to view and manipulate your own schedule, not others'.

Right now the Outlook/Exchange has really strong group/calendar support. I don't think anything comes close when you're tied to Exchange.

If you can use a calendar server that talks a really open protocol, such as CalDAV, you might have better luck. Too bad it seems right now all web interfaces are tied to specific CalDAV servers - a good web-based interface that would work with any CalDAV server would be a great companion to the very promising Apple calendarserver ( http://calendarserver.org ).

Reply Score: 1

Android is not Linux, and not an OS
by braddock on Fri 2nd Jan 2009 23:07 UTC
braddock
Member since:
2005-07-08

I'm enjoying hacking on my G1, but...

Android is not Linux, because so far Google has refused to allow developers or users to directly use any of the Linux underpinnings.

You are locked into a non-standard Java jail.

Google seems intent on re-inventing all the Java API's Sun spent the past 15 years on, and re-developing, or at least wrapping, all the GNU/Linux libraries and app frameworks of the past 20 years.

Best example: The utter lack of usable video playback on the G1, even though I can apt-get almost every codec known to mankind in my G1 Debian install.

Android on a Netbook is not exciting - it is not an actual platform, just a Java app with some plugins. It COULD be a contender if Google comes to their senses. I hope they do.

Reply Score: 14

tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

I'm enjoying hacking on my G1, but...

Android is not Linux, because so far Google has refused to allow developers or users to directly use any of the Linux underpinnings.

You are locked into a non-standard Java jail.

Google seems intent on re-inventing all the Java API's Sun spent the past 15 years on, and re-developing, or at least wrapping, all the GNU/Linux libraries and app frameworks of the past 20 years.

Best example: The utter lack of usable video playback on the G1, even though I can apt-get almost every codec known to mankind in my G1 Debian install.

Android on a Netbook is not exciting - it is not an actual platform, just a Java app with some plugins. It COULD be a contender if Google comes to their senses. I hope they do.


It's not clear why Android would be any more interesting on a Netbook than Linux or Windows. Seriously, why?!? What can't I run on Linux or Windows that I can run on Android?

Reply Score: 3

danieldk Member since:
2005-11-18

It's not clear why Android would be any more interesting on a Netbook than Linux or Windows. Seriously, why?!? What can't I run on Linux or Windows that I can run on Android?


Because, frankly, Linux on netbooks currently sucks. Every cheap Asian brand uses it's own semi-proprietary Linux distribution that is a fork of Linpus, Xandros, or something else. There is no compatibility, no consistency, whatsoever.

That's fine for our tiny contingent of the population who can install/roll our own stuff and put Ubuntu or what the heck we want on it, but that's not going to work for the majority of users out there. So, if they can choose between Windows XP (which they know) or a private distribution that requires typing commands in a terminal, even for installing basic functionality, they will use Windows.

Another thing to keep in mind is, is a netbook a small computer or phone-ish gizmo? Linux on a netbook as a small computer is not really interesting for most consumers: Microsoft dropped the prices on XP for netbooks, hardware specs are going up, and people can install pirated/non-pirated Office on their netbook. Why would they not use the same system as their home computer? Whereas, if we see a netbook as an mobile gizmo (forgive me for using that word), it does not need to be functionally equivalent to a home PC. But it requires a consistent interface, an easy manner to get or purchase applications, and a single consistent API for game and application vendors to write applications for the platform. Think iPhone, but differently. Android is a good contender for providing a software layer for such products.

Consistency is also one of the reasons why I, even though I am a daily C++ user, prefer to see Android restricted to Dalvik-based languages (Java, Scala, etc.). Having multiple runtimes, widget toolkits, and package managers is not going to help anyone in that space.

Edited 2009-01-03 09:06 UTC

Reply Score: 1

centos_user Member since:
2008-11-16

Google has become the Microsoft Monopoly and taking PRIVATE DATA from willing sheep to install their software.


Has anyone ever thought what Google is doing with YOUR personal data that you are being willing sheep and installing it.

What about Communist China, Google turned over server logs to the Communist Gov to track down people wanting to learn the truth about stuff however Google stepped in like 1984 and helped out Communist China...


NO thanks,

I will use MY Linux Distro of choice and NOT use Big Brother 2.0 on my stuff.

Reply Score: 2

vames Member since:
2009-01-04

Are you even reading what you are saying before you force out unto the world? If you do not like the fact that Google are taking information to make your search queries in Google Search better, turn it off and shut up. If you do not like that Google takes info when using Google Desktop then that is no ones fault but yours, there is an option to accept or not accept this when first installing Google Desktop, if you made a mistake then go into the settings and turn it off.

Everyone criticize Google on how they handle privacy and are mostly unaware that the option is there to turn it off, instead they like yourself blabber on the internet like blind duck. For the record, your privacy only stays on the Google servers for a maximum of 3 or 6 months before they are completely deleted.

People like yourself should probably go ahead and start a damn religion on privacy or something.

Reply Score: 0

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

To add to this (aimed at centos_user)...
If you don't want to use Gmail, don't. If you don't want your messages archived, either turn this off or go delete them every once in a while--you can actually do that, you know, surprise surprise. If you don't want your email out there, or in anyones hands but your own, run your own email server. No matter what webmail service you use, or even ISP mail service, your information is going to be used by that company, period. Don't like it? Get a spare computer, put your favorite os on it, and get that server running.
In fact, let's make this simple. To sum it all up, for complete privacy, here's what you do. Close all bank accounts and credit cards, disconnect your internet service, drop your phone service, board up your windows and doors, and enjoy yourself. Concessions to privacy are inevitable, and not just on the internet. Accept this, or go live in isolation.

Reply Score: 2

darrelljon Member since:
2008-05-29

Google has become the Microsoft Monopoly and taking PRIVATE DATA from willing sheep to install their software.


Has anyone ever thought what Google is doing with YOUR personal data that you are being willing sheep and installing it.

What about Communist China, Google turned over server logs to the Communist Gov to track down people wanting to learn the truth about stuff however Google stepped in like 1984 and helped out Communist China...


NO thanks,

I will use MY Linux Distro of choice and NOT use Big Brother 2.0 on my stuff.

China is not communist - it is state-capitalist. Obama is a capitalist too. Communism is not about authoritarianism - to say it is amounts to a deductive fallacy. Communism is about sharing - such as sharing source code in FOSS projects.

Reply Score: 1

BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

What about Communist China, Google turned over server logs to the Communist Gov to track down people wanting to learn the truth about stuff however Google stepped in like 1984 and helped out Communist China...


That begs the question: what exactly do you think Google should have done instead? Cease operating in China altogether? Or maybe stage a coup to overthrow the Chinese government?

Reply Score: 1

raboof Member since:
2005-07-24

so far Google has refused to allow developers or users to directly use any of the Linux underpinnings.

You are locked into a non-standard Java jail.


To be fair, isn't the development phone ( http://code.google.com/android/dev-devices.html ) fully unlocked (both simlock and bootloader), and the relevant platform code now available open-source (though I seem to have misplaced the link)?

Android on a Netbook is not exciting - it is not an actual platform, just a Java app with some plugins.


Not sure if it's an `actual platform', but Android sure is a hack of a lot more than just a Java app: they wrote a somewhat-complete `J'VM for use in resource-constrained environments (Dalvik), quite a feat!

That said, I feel Android's advantage is that it runs well in little resources. Netbooks will be much less resource-constrained, so I'm not so sure if Android would be so valuable there. It would be nice if applications would be portable between Android and whatever will run on those netbooks, though.

Reply Score: 1

Why? Compatibility
by mabhatter on Sat 3rd Jan 2009 00:16 UTC
mabhatter
Member since:
2005-07-17

I think the reason for Android will be compatibility with whatever mobile app store Google opens to be like iPhone. Because EVERYBODY will be doing it. The BIG question is if pay-for apps will run properly under non-OEM installs of the virtual machine. A poster at engadget mentioned that using the VM inside Ubuntu remix might be the optimum solution. When the Google Android apps start to trickle in, having that available to netbooks would be the killer app needed to keep netbooks from being "just little PCs".

I don't think an Android -OS on a netbook would be useful because it's too limiting. But it would be a nice feature to have as it is STANDARD and the apps will be designed for lots of devices. It might be the glue needed between the OSS world and the commercial world.

Reply Score: 3

Technological Convergence
by middleware on Sat 3rd Jan 2009 00:42 UTC
middleware
Member since:
2006-05-11

Android must not stay only in the smart phone field for ever. It's a time of technological convergence. No hardware should be too weak to run a general-purpose OS. And no OS should be too specific to run hardware other than a smart phone.

Reply Score: 1

KDE4/Plasma
by bralkein on Sat 3rd Jan 2009 14:21 UTC
bralkein
Member since:
2006-12-20

I certainly have no objection to the idea of running Android on netbooks, but I wouldn't count out the current major FOSS desktop environments either. I know for instance that one of the hopes for the KDE4 Plasma desktop shell was that it would allow for the easy creation of UIs more suited to small form factor devices. Blog linky: http://aseigo.blogspot.com/2008/03/plasma-on-mobile-devices.html

I don't really follow GNOME so I don't know if those guys are working on anything but I wouldn't be surprised if they had some ongoing project up their sleeve, too. Any GNOME fans know anything about any work in this direction?

Reply Score: 2

Drool
by motang on Sat 3rd Jan 2009 16:25 UTC
motang
Member since:
2008-03-27

This has gotten me extremely excited, I can't wait to see more. Definitely I will be looking forward to Android running on netbooks. I might have to hold out on getting the HP Mini 1000 and see what this blossoms into. ;)

Reply Score: 1

v Google - aka (Big Brother Android)...
by centos_user on Sat 3rd Jan 2009 17:48 UTC
gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

[insert facepalm here]

Reply Score: 1

ho hum
by poundsmack on Mon 5th Jan 2009 18:57 UTC
poundsmack
Member since:
2005-07-13

I think I might be one of the only people who just isnt that excited about Android. After playing with it and taking it appart i was not really impressed. I would much rather see WinCE 6.5 (an eventualy 7.0) netbooks. the battery life would be off teh charts not the mention with the Windows standard shell (looks like win 98 or xp in clasic mode) its super easy to use and comfortable.

I like knowing i can write .NET apps in Visual Studio and compile it against WinCE and have a working app in little time (on x86). But then again there is a little bit of bias as i am just not a google person, was always a yahoo person myself. personaly i find them just as open as google (if not more) yahoo's stuff is just under the radar.

Reply Score: 2