Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 6th Jan 2009 20:57 UTC, submitted by jptros
Mac OS X At the MacWorld Expo today in San Fransisco, Apple announced new versions of iWork and iLife, as well as an updated 17" MacBook Pro, which promises a battery life of 7-8 hours. More interesting, however, is the fact that yesterday was Mac OS X Server's 10th birthday.
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Server
by Buck on Tue 6th Jan 2009 21:07 UTC
Buck
Member since:
2005-06-29

Yay for the MacOSX Server. Throughout the years it has served me well. A fine tool if you know how and where to apply it.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Server
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 7th Jan 2009 16:21 UTC in reply to "Server"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Despite your own experiences, I would think that it would have to be viewed as a disappointment. Its not even considered as an option by many businesses. Its Unix, but not Linux. Its GUI Administration, but not windows. There isn't a core of sys admins that are demanding enough of it to move it in the right direction to keep up with the others.

Reply Score: 1

More interesting
by Chicken Blood on Tue 6th Jan 2009 21:30 UTC
Chicken Blood
Member since:
2005-12-21

More interesting, however, is the fact that yesterday was Mac OS X Server's 10th birthday

Hmmm, I wouldn's say that was 'more interesting' than a 17" notebook with a battery life of 8 hours is (if indeed, it delivers).

Reply Score: 2

RE: More interesting
by Adurbe on Wed 7th Jan 2009 09:47 UTC in reply to "More interesting"
Adurbe Member since:
2005-07-06

it was a truely rubbish expo..

(to clarify rubbish, I wanted a new mac mini and I was itching to go online and buy one!)

Reply Score: 2

Congrats OSX Server
by milles21 on Tue 6th Jan 2009 22:16 UTC
milles21
Member since:
2006-11-08

I have used OS X server for some time now. I can't speak for everyone , however for me it has been highly reliable. I have upgraded to new hardware by buying either refurb mac pro's.

This has allowed the cost of Mac hardware to be a non issue. Rock solid easy to maintain, easy to upgrade. Congrats OS X I can't wait for 10.6 server, with ZFS goodness.

Reply Score: 2

Ooh! Ooh!
by Devils_Advocate on Wed 7th Jan 2009 01:46 UTC
Devils_Advocate
Member since:
2006-02-09

I think I still have those discs around! Somewhere.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Ooh! Ooh!
by neozeed on Wed 7th Jan 2009 04:08 UTC in reply to "Ooh! Ooh!"
neozeed Member since:
2006-03-03

Ive got mine, in the box stamped as 1.1 along with my 1.2 upgrade CD that sadly didn't allow it to be installed on my AGP g4....

At least the OS X 10.0 public beta was what? $20?

Reply Score: 2

NeXTSTEP
by tony on Wed 7th Jan 2009 13:50 UTC
tony
Member since:
2005-07-06

Back in the mid-90s, I used NeXTSTEP quite a bit, and Mac OS X server is basically the next-gen of that operating system. Such a great operating system and environment. I remember the Mac OS X previews that were NeXTSTEP with the Mac OS 9 window treatment running on a Quadra. Ah, those were the days.

Reply Score: 2

A small quibble / elaboration
by StephenBeDoper on Wed 7th Jan 2009 19:56 UTC
StephenBeDoper
Member since:
2005-07-06

The "read more" section of the article isn't entirely clear on the relationship between the original releases of OS X Server and the current Apple OSes that bear the "OS X" name (effectively, there were two separate-but-related lines of OS X that have been called "OS X Server" - the 1.x line and the 10.x line).

IIRC, OS X Server (the 1.x versions) were effectively updated versions of Rhapsody - using a modified version of the OS 8/9 "platinum" theme, with NeXTStep tech under the hood. It was released a year or two before the original OS X public beta - and OS X Server (or its codebase) was the basis for client versions of OS X.

And after the release of 10.0, Apple released a version with some server-specific tools under the "OS X Server" label. So in a nutshell, OS X Server 10.x is based on client versions of OS X 10.x, which is in turn based on OS X Server 1.x.

BTW, for anyone else interested in the history of OS X, ArsTechnica published very thorough articles on each of the "Developer Preview" releases (from DP2 onward):

http://arstechnica.com/reviews/os/macos-x-dp2.ars

http://arstechnica.com/reviews/1q00/macos-x-gui/macos-x-gui-1.html

http://arstechnica.com/reviews/1q00/macos-x-dp3/macos-x-dp3-1.html

http://arstechnica.com/reviews/2q00/macos-x-dp4/macos-x-dp4-1.html

Reply Score: 5

OS X Server on 'The Tooth'
by itomato on Thu 8th Jan 2009 22:12 UTC
itomato
Member since:
2006-05-18

When Steve unveiled the AIO G3 (AKA The Tooth), all I could dream of was running OS X Server on that beauty..

The joy of NeXTStep, the lusty hardware that was the height of the PPC era..

I had clippings on my office wall for inspiration..

I have since had the opportunity to own said configuration, and I passed it up without much wincing.

It's a shame that they couldn't get more support behind it as NT became 2000, OS/2 and Netware were on their way out.

If they could have quietly offered X86 support for the server, while continuing to offer the 68K and PPC client support, we would have seen the shift to Intel much sooner, and OS X Server would be *far* more evolved than it is today.

I could care less about Aqua. Services are what do it for me..

Reply Score: 1