Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 11th Jan 2009 16:13 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes This week, we start with a new regular occurence on OSNews: the imaginatively named Week in Review, where we do a quick rundown of the preceding week's most important news, and maybe add in a few new items that didn't make the cut earlier in the week. We will close off each of them with My Take, a short random musing about whatever subject we please. This week, the news was dominated by MacWorld, Windows 7, and Palm.
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Comment by matatk
by matatk on Sun 11th Jan 2009 16:38 UTC
matatk
Member since:
2005-07-06

Great summary of a very busy week for tech news; thanks. I would not normally post to say just that (and that IMHO Apple is either spreading itself very thinly, or losing interest in the Mac; though the stuff demonstrated in the keynote was pretty impressive, it wasn't what was anticipated) but given your excellent review of what Roxette was all about I felt compelled to write. I remember listening to Roxette and playing on the new-fangled N64 "back in the day" and you're right -- they had a great style and I miss them -- and will definitely check out Alphabeat.

I do think that Roxette did some very good "grown-up" songs -- including C.B.B. of course but also (the original) It Must Have Been Love, The Rain and the sublime Here Comes the Weekend. It's their upbeat and incredibly catchy hooks mixed with fantastic middle 8s that always manage to lift one's spirits, though, eh!

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by matatk
by Laurence on Mon 12th Jan 2009 10:03 UTC in reply to "Comment by matatk"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

and will definitely check out Alphabeat


They're not great. In fact I'd say they're one of the worst examples of "fun pop music".


FAO Thom:

The reason pop has changed is as much down to the record labels as it is the artists.
In fact, with music being my first passion, I could write a whole article on how any hope of hearing good new pop music was lost when Simon Cowell became a celebrity - which is also why I don't listen to the radio anymore and instead source out those smaller artists yet to have a chart influence.

Reply Score: 3

tyrione
Member since:
2005-11-21

...you don't go out with a big splash. You save it for future events.

Reply Score: 1

wynand32
Member since:
2009-01-11

I'm pretty sure that it was the licensing servers that were overwhelmed. Thus, bittorrent wouldn't have helped.

Reply Score: 2

I like this "Week in Review" thing
by flanque on Sun 11th Jan 2009 20:54 UTC
flanque
Member since:
2005-12-15

Hi Thom,

I like this week in review style article. Is it something you're going to continue doing? I'd love to see this continue.

Sorry if you've announced this elsewhere.. I've somehow missed it if you have.

Reply Score: 2

Kokopelli Member since:
2005-07-06

The announcement the the week in review would be a regular occurance was well hidden in the first sentence of the article. ;)

Reply Score: 3

flanque Member since:
2005-12-15

Haha.. Damn it! Sorry, Thom.

Reply Score: 2

hollovoid Member since:
2005-09-21

Don't feel bad, I was wondering the same thing and had a DOH when I saw that comment. Another opportunity to laugh at myself I guess.

Reply Score: 2

Did they really have to steal the Dock?
by nutshell42 on Sun 11th Jan 2009 23:18 UTC
nutshell42
Member since:
2006-01-12

The new taskbar clearly comes out of Cupertino, and that's a bad thing. There is a reason Apple zealots never used the dock as an example why OSX is superior.

You can go on about document-centric interfaces as long as you like. The simple fact is that when an explorer window is open in 7, and I want to open another one, it's needlessly complicated. The same for editors, browser windows and anything else. Pinning programs to the taskbar is useless and with that new "feature" MS effectively eliminated the quicklaunch functionality from Windows.

(even worse is that 7 doesn't let you open a new eplorer window while another one shows the same directory. If you want to open two windows and browse to different directories to drag&drop, you have to change the dir in the first one before you can open another window. 100% braindead)

Reply Score: 2

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

The new taskbar clearly comes out of Cupertino, and that's a bad thing. There is a reason Apple zealots never used the dock as an example why OSX is superior.


The dock and the taskbar have always been fairly similar. Windows 7 does move some inches closer to the dock, but in the end, the fundamental difference in approach to apps/windows is still there.

The simple fact is that when an explorer window is open in 7, and I want to open another one, it's needlessly complicated.


ctrl+n.

Pinning programs to the taskbar is useless and with that new "feature" MS effectively eliminated the quicklaunch functionality from Windows.


No, they have not. They merged quicklaunch with the taskbar, which is different.

(even worse is that 7 doesn't let you open a new eplorer window while another one shows the same directory. If you want to open two windows and browse to different directories to drag&drop, you have to change the dir in the first one before you can open another window. 100% braindead)


ctrl+n.

Reply Score: 2

DCMonkey Member since:
2005-07-06

Shift+Click and Middle Click will also launch new instances of windows from w7 taskbar buttons.

Reply Score: 2

sultanqasim Member since:
2006-10-28

"The simple fact is that when an explorer window is open in 7, and I want to open another one, it's needlessly complicated. The same for editors, browser windows and anything else. Pinning programs to the taskbar is useless and with that new "feature" MS effectively eliminated the quicklaunch functionality from Windows."

Ever heard of keyboard shortcuts? I don't think that pressing Ctrl-N is that hard.


Edit: Why did Thom have to publish his comment before me! :p

Edited 2009-01-11 23:42 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Punktyras Member since:
2006-01-07

even worse is that 7 doesn't let you open a new eplorer window while another one shows the same directory. If you want to open two windows and browse to different directories to drag&drop, you have to change the dir in the first one before you can open another window. 100% braindead)


Doesn't explorer has „split window“ capability yet? If it is so, shame on explorer...

Reply Score: 3

Showing Up Quite A Lot
by Jason Bourne on Mon 12th Jan 2009 00:57 UTC
Jason Bourne
Member since:
2007-06-02

I think Tom is showing himself up quite a lot recently... this could not be very benefitial, because all you read it's him. Soon people will start to question this site credibility. I've seen some real strange stuff over the past months, even personal rants between him and another publisher. Forgive me, but this is looking more like a personal blog than a news site!

Reply Score: 2

RE: Showing Up Quite A Lot
by Morgan on Mon 12th Jan 2009 01:12 UTC in reply to "Showing Up Quite A Lot"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

OSNews has always had a "rough around the edges", personal feel to it. It's one of the reasons I've been here for so many years. I will admit, Thom's attitude in the past has put me off for a bit, but I get over it because I know it's not personal.

So, if you don't like the way OSNews is going, please create a website more in line with your idea of how it should be done. Drop us a link and I for one would love to visit and help you build a following. As I've always said: If you don't like the way something is done, do it better and you won't have anything to complain about.

Reply Score: 2

Apple hardware
by FriedmannSolution5 on Tue 13th Jan 2009 23:09 UTC
FriedmannSolution5
Member since:
2008-12-28

I think what Apple needs to do is publish an open source version of their OS, but have compile flags in the code which (if available) make calls to proprietary hardware. this way, you could run OS X on a regular machine, but never get the advantages of running it on Apple hardware, which might have cool multi-core PA-semi coprocessors etc that take full advantage of OpenCL. sure, it'll run on a standard i686 box, but you'll be missing out in terms of the cool stuff. this way, they could really grow their developer base, move into business applications in a serious way (no reason for the IT dept to have to buy Apple HW) but at the same time, reserve their cool gear for higher margin. and leave OSX neat and closed the way it is. this way developers will not resent Apple hardware as being expensive because it'll have stuff that no other machine can actually do - so there's little risk to Apple to have everyone buy generic white boxes - the hw is still incredibly desirable and can command a higher margin. But they get into the business app world in a more serious way once they get rid of the Mac stigma that IT managers just roll their eyes at, and always will. apart from certain departments like audio/visual and creative and sound where Apple is appropriate, there's little chance of Macs getting into the standard desktop environment no matter how good they are almost - Apple should wake up to this, and step outside "Mac" a little more.

Reply Score: 1