Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 18th Jan 2009 21:39 UTC
Windows When we reviewed the Windows 7 beta, we did so on a standard desktop machine. However, the big thing in hardware right now is not the desktop, but the netbook segment. Since Microsoft claims that Windows 7 is geared towards netbooks, I decided to give the beta a go on my trusty Acer Aspire One. Read on for installation instructions if you don't own an external DVD drive, and a few very short first impressions.
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yeah...
by google_ninja on Sun 18th Jan 2009 23:50 UTC
google_ninja
Member since:
2006-02-05

In other words: NVIDIA, get your act together.


I used to have a huge amount of customer loyalty towards them. The last 2-3 years they have managed to erode it all away. Between a huge dive in driver quality, and defective hardware on a massive scale (especially in the mobile space, it is hard to believe they are still making money.

Reply Score: 3

RE: its called BETA for a reason
by meeh on Mon 19th Jan 2009 09:29 UTC in reply to "yeah..."
meeh Member since:
2009-01-19

Get their act together? The OS isnt released yet and nvidia prolly havent time to iron out issues before after they considdered the API stable which maybe isnt that long ago.

SW doesnt popup magically you know, its a symbiose of all involved parties.

Reply Score: 1

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

SW doesnt popup magically you know, its a symbiose of all involved parties.


Well, Ati and Intel have perfectly working drivers. Why can't NVIDIA? Haven't they learnt anything from their Vista debacle?

Reply Score: 6

KAMiKAZOW Member since:
2005-07-06

Get their act together? The OS isnt released yet and nvidia prolly havent time to iron out issues before after they considdered the API stable which maybe isnt that long ago.

The driver API is pretty much the same in Vista and 7. 7's kernel is (on purpose) just a slightly updated Vista kernel.
As a Linux user I can fully agree that NVidia should get "the act together". It's been a year since KDE 4.0 was released (with betas even older). Plasma is exposing Nvidia driver bugs since then and NVidia is acting really slow to fix them. While some bugs are fixed (most notably the ultra slow rendering speed and corrupted graphics when OpenOffice is visible), others remain. Tray icons are still mostly distorted for example. I never had those problems on my other PC with a Radeon card.

Reply Score: 5

sergiusens Member since:
2007-09-01

"Get their act together? The OS isnt released yet and nvidia prolly havent time to iron out issues before after they considdered the API stable which maybe isnt that long ago.

The driver API is pretty much the same in Vista and 7. 7's kernel is (on purpose) just a slightly updated Vista kernel.
"

So what changed in order to break the driver?

Reply Score: 2

modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

nVidia's code

Reply Score: 2

Er, nice to know
by quackalist on Mon 19th Jan 2009 00:30 UTC
quackalist
Member since:
2007-08-27

Not sure of the point of this article as knowing how to install Windows 7 on the Aspire One, or Any Other Netbook is all very well, even if tedious.

But, is it worth the bother can hardly, and wasn't, be answered by using such a heavily modified 'Aspire 1' that has little relevance to any Netbook your readers might have to hand.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Er, nice to know
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 19th Jan 2009 00:34 UTC in reply to "Er, nice to know "
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

My netbook is actually less powerful than the stock Windows variant due to the slow drive, so yes, it's relevant.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Er, nice to know
by Glynser on Mon 19th Jan 2009 07:22 UTC in reply to "RE: Er, nice to know "
Glynser Member since:
2007-11-29

I thought you replaced that as well?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Er, nice to know
by spinnekopje on Mon 19th Jan 2009 07:48 UTC in reply to "RE: Er, nice to know "
spinnekopje Member since:
2008-11-29

Your aspire has 1.5GB ram and the stock model with windows XP has 1GB available...
The size of HD doesn't matter that much if you already took one of 30GB.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Er, nice to know
by dumbkiwi on Mon 19th Jan 2009 08:47 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Er, nice to know "
dumbkiwi Member since:
2006-01-02

Hear hear. Exactly what I was thinking when I read the article.

Reply Score: 1

list disk FAIL
by John Blink on Mon 19th Jan 2009 00:48 UTC
John Blink
Member since:
2005-10-11

I have tried doing this in the past Here is my output. My F: which is my usb key is not visible, but under explorer it is.

Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

C:\Documents and Settings\john>diskpart

Microsoft DiskPart version 5.1.3565

Copyright (C) 1999-2003 Microsoft Corporation.
On computer: VENICE

DISKPART> list disk

Disk ### Status Size Free Dyn Gpt
-------- ---------- ------- ------- --- ---
Disk 0 Online 298 GB 0 B

DISKPART>

Reply Score: 1

RE: list disk FAIL
by John Blink on Mon 19th Jan 2009 02:03 UTC in reply to "list disk FAIL"
John Blink Member since:
2005-10-11

typing list volume shows me numbers.

Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

C:\Documents and Settings\john>diskpart

Microsoft DiskPart version 5.1.3565

Copyright (C) 1999-2003 Microsoft Corporation.
On computer: VENICE

DISKPART> list

Microsoft DiskPart version 5.1.3565

DISK - Prints out a list of disks.
PARTITION - Prints out a list of partitions on the current disk.
VOLUME - Print a list of volumes.

DISKPART> list volume

Volume ### Ltr Label Fs Type Size Status Info
---------- --- ----------- ----- ---------- ------- --------- --------
Volume 0 D DVD-ROM 0 B
Volume 1 C NTFS Partition 49 GB Healthy System
Volume 2 E NTFS Partition 210 GB Healthy
Volume 3 F WIN7 FAT32 Removeable 3936 MB

DISKPART>

is this what I am looking for?

Edited 2009-01-19 02:04 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: list disk FAIL
by n4cer on Mon 19th Jan 2009 16:26 UTC in reply to "RE: list disk FAIL"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

For those partial to a GUI, the USB drive may also be setup using the Disk Management MMC snapin.

Assuming the drive is already formatted (FAT32 in this case):
Insert the USB drive.
Click the Start button.
Right-click (My)Computer.
Click Manage.
Click Disk Management.
Right-click the USB drive partition.
Click Mark Partition as Active.
Copy the files from the Windows DVD/iso to the USB drive.
You may now boot from the drive to install the version of Windows copied (Vista/7/Server 2008/Server 2008 R2).

Apparently the bootsect step mentioned in the article is only necessary if you are preparing the drive on a non-Vista/7 OS.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: list disk FAIL
by John Blink on Mon 19th Jan 2009 23:25 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: list disk FAIL"
John Blink Member since:
2005-10-11

Thanks n4cer.

Reply Score: 1

Promising!
by softdrat on Mon 19th Jan 2009 01:28 UTC
softdrat
Member since:
2008-09-17

From the article:

"Then, load up a command prompt with administrative privileges (right click, "Run as administrator..."), and enter the following commands to properly format the USB drive ..."

Cool! This is just like Linux. Maybe I can get into this "Windows" thing. But what is "administrator"? Is that like "root"? Where can I download the .iso? Can I do all this from Linux? Do I need "wine"?

Reply Score: 10

RE: Promising!
by PlatformAgnostic on Mon 19th Jan 2009 02:40 UTC in reply to "Promising!"
PlatformAgnostic Member since:
2006-01-02

It's almost certainly possible to do this from Linux using fdisk and dd for the bootsector.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Promising!
by raver31 on Mon 19th Jan 2009 21:36 UTC in reply to "RE: Promising!"
raver31 Member since:
2005-07-06

What an amatuer you are at trolling.... having to use fdisk and dd to format a USB drive? which Linux version are you talking about ? kernel v 0.9 perhaps ?

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Promising!
by PlatformAgnostic on Wed 21st Jan 2009 13:48 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Promising!"
PlatformAgnostic Member since:
2006-01-02

Eh? I was not intending to troll.. those are the tools I know which accomplish the task of formatting the drive and embedding a boot sector. What tool would you prefer? (It hadn't occurred to me that Linux would include a gui tool that can set up an MBR since Windows only has command line tools for this).

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Sodki
by Sodki on Mon 19th Jan 2009 02:53 UTC
Sodki
Member since:
2005-11-10

I've been using UNetbootin to do this kind of stuff on GNU/Linux and Windows:

http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/

I just have to select the ISO file, the device and it just works. I use it to boot Windows and GNu/Linux distributions without having to waste CDs.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Comment by Sodki
by lemur2 on Mon 19th Jan 2009 04:47 UTC in reply to "Comment by Sodki"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I've been using UNetbootin to do this kind of stuff on GNU/Linux and Windows:

http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/

I just have to select the ISO file, the device and it just works. I use it to boot Windows and GNu/Linux distributions without having to waste CDs.


This works well for Ubuntu and Fedora .iso files, but I had no luck with Mandriva or SuSe.

I'm looking forward to the speed and power of KDE 4.2 on one of these netbooks. IMO this will be the only really viable way of running a full-powered desktop experience at speed on a netbook.

Edited 2009-01-19 04:49 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by Sodki
by TQH ! on Mon 19th Jan 2009 07:40 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Sodki"
TQH ! Member since:
2006-03-16

Do I understand correctly that the iso needs to be on a partition on the computer in question?

For me it didn't seem to write it to the usb-key at least.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Sodki
by spiderman on Mon 19th Jan 2009 16:13 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Sodki"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

I installed Mandriva on my netbook easily:
download the 'free' iso, mount it, get the vmlinuz and all.rdz from the isolinux/alt0 directory, add that to menu.lst in grub and boot. Then tell it to mount the iso from the hard drive or from the USB key and it will install your Mandriva. You didn't even need a USB key. Just let the iso on the hard drive and you can go.
http://wiki.mandriva.com/en/Docs/Installing_Mandriva_Linux

Edited 2009-01-19 16:15 UTC

Reply Score: 2

SSD? Dont bother
by rkvirani on Mon 19th Jan 2009 03:11 UTC
rkvirani
Member since:
2009-01-19

If you have an SSD drive in your Aspire one (8GB Model) dont bother its not woth the hassle, windows is unusable.

http://lifesdirection.wordpress.com/2009/01/19/windows7-on-the-acer...

Edited 2009-01-19 03:13 UTC

Reply Score: 4

Comment by bnolsen
by bnolsen on Mon 19th Jan 2009 04:15 UTC
bnolsen
Member since:
2006-01-06

There's also the wastefulness of running a virus scanner on these netbooks which will also bring them to their knees.

If anything the last year of netbook experiments has given the linux distro maintainers time to try to get their act together to put together useful distros.

Having an acer aspire one myself (previously having access to an EEE 701) this thing works great as a web access device, webmail reader and for watching media. It should also work well for taking notes.

Reply Score: 4

Get their act together?
by abdavidson on Mon 19th Jan 2009 04:54 UTC
abdavidson
Member since:
2005-07-06

Think you're being ridiculous to tell a company to get its act together because they have a non-optimal driver for a beta release. That is all.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Get their act together?
by REM2000 on Mon 19th Jan 2009 09:37 UTC in reply to "Get their act together?"
REM2000 Member since:
2006-07-25

I think the main reason that nVidia's driver quaility was called into question even on a beta product is that the release of drivers for Vista was a shambles from nVidia. Im a big fan of the cards but when they have had a beta product (Vista) for so long and still release drivers which had poor performance and would BSOD a computer on RTM then they was seriously lazy.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Get their act together?
by lemur2 on Mon 19th Jan 2009 09:48 UTC in reply to "RE: Get their act together?"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I think the main reason that nVidia's driver quaility was called into question even on a beta product is that the release of drivers for Vista was a shambles from nVidia. Im a big fan of the cards but when they have had a beta product (Vista) for so long and still release drivers which had poor performance and would BSOD a computer on RTM then they was seriously lazy.


In the same timeframe (early 2007) as their problem with Vista drivers, nVidia also had a huge performance problem with their driver for Linux. This problem has only just recently been fixed. The Vista problem, at least, was fixed within a couple of months.

Reply Score: 3

Nvidia drivers
by 3rdalbum on Wed 21st Jan 2009 10:53 UTC
3rdalbum
Member since:
2008-05-26

I agree that Nvidia drivers leave a lot to be desired.

On ATI and Intel graphics, you don't have to do ANYTHING in order to get your videos playing properly. No matter if your video player ships with XVideo or X11 output as the default, it'll work.

Use the open-source nv driver and XVideo will work.

Use the Nvidia proprietary driver and if your video player uses Xv, it will not render the video's colours properly. If yours works properly, hang tight - the next driver version will cause mine to work properly and yours not to work.

Nvidia knows about this bug; I'm not the first to have told them, and I'm not the last either. They never fix the problem, they just keep moving it to a different set of cards.

Reply Score: 1