Linked by David Adams on Wed 29th Apr 2009 17:29 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Over at Wired Gadget Lab, they're taking a look back at several people who've gone to a bunch of trouble to hack up and deal with the pitfalls of netbooks running OSX. As the story's title states, it ain't pretty. In a nutshell, they found that even if you load a nice OS onto a cheap, tiny computer, you still have to deal with the inherent downsides of a cheap, tiny computer, and when you run an Apple OS on a non-Apple machine, you'll have some software problems. I read this article with great interest, because a few months ago I bought an MSI Wind (the same netbook that this guy used) with thoughts of putting OSX on it. But this article set me to thinking about netbooks, the mythical Apple netbook, and Apple's Newton legacy.
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and this is suprising because ...
by rockwell on Wed 29th Apr 2009 17:47 UTC
rockwell
Member since:
2005-09-13

Kind of like ... if built a kit-car Ferrari Modena ... and put a Ford Escort engine in it but added like five turbochargers ... it wouldn't be the same as the genuine article.

No. Really?

Reply Score: 3

OSX Wind
by Adurbe on Wed 29th Apr 2009 17:49 UTC
Adurbe
Member since:
2005-07-06

I use osx on my wind (advent4211)

Works a treat. In reality I could as happily use a linux distro, just a little less fun ;)

I was quite surprised how well osx runs on a non optimized platform with limited memory.

It does show that apple could produce a mini mini with an ion chipset for graphics that would function as a wonderful media centre

Reply Score: 3

I use my small netbook with UNR all day
by kragil on Wed 29th Apr 2009 18:09 UTC
kragil
Member since:
2006-01-04

I have a EeePC 901, with SSD and it rocks.
I wanted small and something that wouldn't break easily to surf everywhere and read PDFs and websites.

It has been great so far .. maybe the ARM powered devices with touchscreens might be better in the future.

I don't do a lot of typing on my EeePC, but the small size, the robustness and the multitouch touchpad really are great. (So is the added screen realastate provided by the Ubuntu Netbook Remix.)

Reply Score: 4

How many hours before APPLE issues a DMCA
by goffster on Wed 29th Apr 2009 18:13 UTC
goffster
Member since:
2007-11-24

on this article

Reply Score: 4

KugelKurt Member since:
2005-07-06

The aricle doesn't tell how the hack was done, so it doesn't fall under DMCA.

Reply Score: 2

WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

The aricle doesn't tell how the hack was done, so it doesn't fall under DMCA.

Hasn't stopped Apple before.

Reply Score: 5

Nope
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 29th Apr 2009 18:14 UTC
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

Pondered OS X on my Aspire One as well. Two reasons I decided not to bother.

I) No drivers for the wireless card. I'd need to replace it with another one.

II) Windows 7. Why would I go through all the trouble of hacking Mac OS X on my netbook, with all the associated DIY crap, when there's Windows 7 which I like just as much as OS X?

Edited 2009-04-29 18:14 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE: Nope
by Adurbe on Wed 29th Apr 2009 18:26 UTC in reply to "Nope"
Adurbe Member since:
2005-07-06

DIYing an OS onto unsupported hardware is half the fun :-)

I learnt more hacking OSX onto an unsupported PC system then using my real mac sitting on my desk.

Why? Because my mac 'just works' my hackintosh works.. but im sure i can make it better.. maybe a little better... little more....... Broken :-D

I would never be able to do the same on my Mac as I couldn't afford the downtime which would inevitably follow!

Reply Score: 4

Netbook
by Kancept on Wed 29th Apr 2009 18:18 UTC
Kancept
Member since:
2006-01-09

I have a Dell mini9 and really enjoy OSX on it. I think it's like OS/2 in the regard that you have to do your research first, especially on hardware to have a good experience in hacking these things. I use the netbook so much that it has now become my main machine. I just sold my 17" MBP and use this thing exclusively now. Sure, I can't video edit and do Aperture stuff, but for what I've been doing, it works great.

When I get home, it plugs into my 20" LCD and if I need to do a ton of typing, I use my Apple bluetooth keyboard. I have a nice tablet hooked in and all. Even put IR in mine for Keynote presentations.

I mean, really, by today's standards the thing is underpowered, but it's a 1.6 GHz processor with 2 GB RAM. I have a 16GB SSD, which works great, and if I need more storage, I have 3TB on my home network I can access. For a typical person's use it's a fine processor and such.

Yeah, I'm crazy using it for my main machine, but it works, has saved me money (sold my 17" high-rez for good coin) and works for my research and web design stuff.

Reply Score: 4

dell xps410
by frantisheq on Wed 29th Apr 2009 18:25 UTC
frantisheq
Member since:
2008-07-25

i'm running mac os on my dell xps410 (quad 2.4GHz, 8GB RAM) since tiger 10.4.7 and i love it. for me vista was no option and i like to play with photoshop sometimes which is a no go on Linux unless you want it to run under wine. as a real vista hater i must say Windows 7 is really great OS from MS after long time but Mac OS suits all my needs pretty well and if i really need something from windows world there's vmware+xp

Edited 2009-04-29 18:25 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Misleading title all the way...
by pruneau on Wed 29th Apr 2009 18:26 UTC
pruneau
Member since:
2007-08-22

Disclaimer: I own a netbook (acer aspire one), but I did not try to run OSX on it.
However, the article referred to is not about OSD: yeah the guy lost his wi-fi due to a faulty driver, but how could that be related to OSX only ???
His main complaint is about the hardware. Too bad for him: I'm subbing/biking/reading/whatevering with my aspire one in my back pack since I bought it 6 month ago, and no screw did ever loosen, even just a bit.
Now, when I have time to find the article referred two where two of his colleagues are complaining, there may be substance about real hackintosh problem.
This article is a waste of cyberspace.

Reply Score: 3

Well that's a jaded view
by drcoldfoot on Wed 29th Apr 2009 19:35 UTC
drcoldfoot
Member since:
2006-08-25

Is this an Apple "Get the Facts" campaign? I believe that this is the kind of article that Apple wants distributed over the internet. "Buy a Genuine MAC" forget what you think you'd want!
I believe that the Hackintosh and hackbook projects are worthy and educational. For $279, of course you wouldn't get the performance of the $1000+ laptops! That's a given!

Reply Score: 4

RE: Well that's a jaded view
by David on Wed 29th Apr 2009 19:46 UTC in reply to "Well that's a jaded view"
David Member since:
1997-10-01

Though it wasn't my intention to make that point, I can see what you're saying. Make no mistake, I admire the hackers and the rabble-rousers who are making netbook hackintoshes, and I don't think they should wait for table scraps from Apple. I just need to complete the four uncompleted hacking projects that I'm already working on before I take on a new one.

Reply Score: 2

Did this...
by darknexus on Wed 29th Apr 2009 21:34 UTC
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

A friend and I did this with his MSI Wind. He wanted to go all the way and he did, replacing his wireless card and everything with a Dell 1390 MiniPCI card which has the same Broadcom (yuck) chipset as the Airport cards in modern Macbooks. He also upgraded the RAM to 2gb, which IMHO is a must for running OS X with any reasonable degree of speed. Leopard, in particular, can easily swap out with only 1gb of RAM. It did work, and it worked pretty well, but eventually the custom hacks you needed to do to keep it updated to the latest Leopard revisions got on his nerves, and mine too whenever I had to remotely fix it either by ssh or by phone. It was his Wind, but I knew more about OS X itself, so everytime something broke he'd end up asking for my help. I didn't have a netbook at the time, and I have a real Mac so I didn't bother making a hackintosh myself.
It's one of those hacking projects that, if you're a computer geek, you enjoy doing and can feel quite the sense of accomplishment after doing it. As long as you don't have to keep up with the latest OS X revisions, it works fine at least on the MSI Wind with its wifi card swapped out. In the end though, something tends to crop up whether it's a problem with updates, or for some reason your kexts stop being automatically loaded... it's often more trouble than it's worth in the long haul. Sometimes, it made some of the Linux upgrade issues I've had look like nothing by comparison. In general, once you get a hackintosh running... leave it alone or you're likely to break it. OS X is fragile on non-Apple hardware, and there are some really crappy drivers out there.
When I got my Eee pc 1000HE, I didn't bother with it even though it's pretty well suited to be a hackintosh. I'm sick of Apple in any case, and didn't want to deal with yet another unfinished hacking project, so I just stuck Ubuntu 9.04 on it.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Did this...
by cmost on Wed 29th Apr 2009 22:56 UTC in reply to "Did this..."
cmost Member since:
2006-07-16

I'm sick of Apple in any case, and didn't want to deal with yet another unfinished hacking project, so I just stuck Ubuntu 9.04 on it.


Umm, excuse me? What do you think Ubuntu (or any Linux distribution for that matter) is if not an unfinished hacking project? Ubuntu, being based on Debian is nothing more than a snapshot of Debian's Unstable branch at a given point in time. Polished and finessed of course until good enough for daily use (debatable.) Nevertheless, still a work in progress.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Did this...
by darknexus on Thu 30th Apr 2009 00:08 UTC in reply to "RE: Did this..."
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Not the point, and I guess I shouldn't've even brought up Ubuntu, since it's going to throw the conversation back into another Linux vs OS X vs whatever flamewar. Appologies in advance before the flamewar sparks...
What I meant was that I do not want to be constantly hacking/fixing my system. Any os, be it Windows or Linux or OS X, needs some regular maintenance and upkeep. But I don't feel like dealing with tempramental kexts on a daily basis, being concerned that the latest hacked update will break something or cause unforseen issues with another driver, etc. All oses have issues, but at the moment I find dealing with Linux much less of a headache than dealing with hacked OS X installations after a few months. Your milage and experience may vary, of course, but my findings are that a hackintosh is more effort than it's ultimately worth, particularly on a netbook. On a desktop, now... with Apple's prices, that may be worth the trouble if you want a relatively cheap and powerful OS X machine, especially since you can build a machine more powerful than the entry level MacPro for a third of its price.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Did this...
by Phase Angle on Thu 30th Apr 2009 08:57 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Did this..."
Phase Angle Member since:
2006-06-28

Yeah I tried it on a few desktop and a laptop but found the same problems. Some thing breaks on my brothers Hack every week it seems and he was the one who talked me into trying it. I found linux to be a similar experience but it is better with older hardware. With a hackintosh older hardware becomes a real problem.

Reply Score: 1

Newton will not be back..
by tobyv on Thu 30th Apr 2009 05:51 UTC
tobyv
Member since:
2008-08-25

For better or worse, Newton will never make a comeback while Steve Jobs is around.

Like Hypercard, anything created by John Sculley's Apple is gone forever ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE: Newton will not be back..
by werpu on Sat 2nd May 2009 09:52 UTC in reply to "Newton will not be back.."
werpu Member since:
2006-01-18

For better or worse, Newton will never make a comeback while Steve Jobs is around.

Like Hypercard, anything created by John Sculley's Apple is gone forever ;)


Well the PDA market is absolutely dead, it has merged with the mobile phones to the smartphone market...

Reply Score: 1

Comment by gfx1
by gfx1 on Thu 30th Apr 2009 09:42 UTC
gfx1
Member since:
2006-01-20

I tried osx on my pc last week (desktop) the ideneb 1.4 install went pretty smoothly, obviously the graphics card wasn't supported (ati hd3200 onboard) (but vesa worked) sound worked, dvd burning didn't work.
It's nice but I could not see any advantage about it over running xubuntu.
I still don't like itunes, prefer firefox above safari.
It's fun to try but I'm really not desparete enough to buy one. I can live with linux and the odd windows box.

Edited 2009-04-30 09:48 UTC

Reply Score: 3