Linked by Kroc Camen on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 12:16 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes Software moves on at a break-neck pace these days--version numbers clock up ever quicker as vendors try to market their apps as the latest and greatest. Software generally ages badly, falling into a state of looking grossly out of date, lacking new functionality that we've come to depend upon as well as compatibility problems. Dear OSNews readers, what old software (5+ years) do you still use, why, and what problems do you come across in sticking with it? Read More for my own contribution to the list
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Norton Commander
by testman on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 12:33 UTC
testman
Member since:
2007-10-15

I've always kept this around and found it handy for file management.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Norton Commander
by linxdev on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 12:59 UTC in reply to "Norton Commander"
linxdev Member since:
2006-10-26

Qmodem Pro inside Dosemu on Linux

Reply Score: 2

RE: Norton Commander
by diegoviola on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:01 UTC in reply to "Norton Commander"
diegoviola Member since:
2006-08-15

I've always kept this around and found it handy for file management.


You could use Midnight Commander, which is free, it works on Linux as well as on Windows (cross platform).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:GNU_Midnight_Commander_4.1.36_Win...

Edited 2009-06-22 18:03 UTC

Reply Score: 3

UNIX APP
by lcdumais on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 12:36 UTC
lcdumais
Member since:
2006-03-10

I use the bash console with all the "ls", "mkdir"... I work 1960s style.

Reply Score: 10

RE: UNIX APP
by xeniast on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 16:18 UTC in reply to "UNIX APP"
xeniast Member since:
2006-02-04

Emacs

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: UNIX APP
by bm3719 on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:38 UTC in reply to "RE: UNIX APP"
bm3719 Member since:
2006-05-30

I really feel sorry for all of the users out there who have not discovered the glory of the One True Editor. Not only do they waste their time memorizing a different UI paradigm for every task they could possibly ever want to use a computer for, they're not even aware of a Better Way (namely, Emacs, of course).

As an Emacs user, a conversation like this is pointless, since I use Emacs for just about everything. Whenever I want to do something new, chances are that Emacs can do it, and since I already know and love Emacs, getting a keymap for a new mode is just a C-h m away.

Emacs forever!

Reply Score: 0

RE[3]: UNIX APP
by FealDorf on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 20:52 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: UNIX APP"
FealDorf Member since:
2008-01-07

"Except it takes forever to learn"

(aww c'mon no mention of emacs is complete without vi)

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: UNIX APP
by kaiwai on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 05:40 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: UNIX APP"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

"Except it takes forever to learn"

(aww c'mon no mention of emacs is complete without vi)


I remember when I loaded up emacs for the first time - I couldn't even find a way to exit it was that scary. After my brief exposure I quickly ran back to vi and remained there to this day; when I am in my university lectures I use vi for my note taking; small, reliable and functional - without all the usual fluff that comes with the typical note taking tool.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: UNIX APP
by Soulbender on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 01:42 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: UNIX APP"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I really feel sorry for all of the users out there who have not discovered the glory of the One True Editor.


Amen, vi(m) is awesome.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: UNIX APP
by dylansmrjones on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 02:06 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: UNIX APP"
dylansmrjones Member since:
2005-10-02

nano is the One True Editor...

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: UNIX APP
by IvoLimmen on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 05:22 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: UNIX APP"
IvoLimmen Member since:
2005-07-06

You mean Notepad++ don't you?

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: UNIX APP
by Traumflug on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 06:06 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: UNIX APP"
Traumflug Member since:
2008-05-22

I'm glad to see all the "improvements" over the last years in vi are hidden well enough to not get into my way. Using vi the same way I did in 1995.

Then, there's FileMaker for the Mac. Version 3 did everything needed, newer versions make things just more complicated.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: UNIX APP
by gbanfalvi on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 08:54 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: UNIX APP"
gbanfalvi Member since:
2009-02-25

I really feel sorry for all of the users out there who have not discovered the glory of the user interface. Not only do they waste their time memorizing a different set of shortcuts for every task that needs a dedicated and properly designed application, they're not even aware that one size does not fit all.

As a common-sense-haver, a conversation like this is pointless, since I use applications for just about everything. Whenever I want to do something new, chances are that my package manager has it, and since I already know how to press buttons and hate learning dozens of obscure shortcuts - which research proves to be slower - getting an app is just an apt-get away.

Sorry, couldn't help myself.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: UNIX APP
by tapoueh on Thu 25th Jun 2009 17:32 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: UNIX APP"
tapoueh Member since:
2009-06-25

I don't think you get it. Emacs is Unix to next level, a unified shell interface to all those command line tools you can combine with pipes. With Emacs you can interactively combine them, following grep to the source files, moving or renaming a bunch of files, etc, all of this by means of Unix traditional tool suite.

When you oppose Emacs to user interface, you're simply showing you don't know Emacs enough to be saying your own way of using software is better: you don't have the keys to understand what Emacs is, it seems. Which is fine, but please, don't pretend you do.

Emacs is a platform hosting applications which share a user interface optimized to interact with text content. Amongst other things, of course.

Reply Score: 1

For my personal computer, games
by Hypnos on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 12:36 UTC
Hypnos
Member since:
2008-11-19

For my desktop/laptop I don't have to deal with legacy code for work (unless you count scientific software written in Fortran, which are still maintained), but some games are classics that have yet to be equaled.

In my case, these are Descent 3 and Easy Bridge. Descent 3 runs fine to the extent that your 32-bit OpenGL libs work with your current Xorg setup. Easy Bridge (which helps you learn/train for the card game) just gets better and better under Wine ;)

Reply Score: 2

chemical_scum Member since:
2005-11-02

For my desktop/laptop I don't have to deal with legacy code for work (unless you count scientific software written in Fortran, which are still maintained),


Yes some of the scientific code written in Fortran is of ancient origin.

I use GAMESS no not something you play but General Molecular Electronic Structure System a quantum mechanical program. From the manual:

GAMESS was put together from several existing quantum chemistry programs, particularly HONDO, by the staff of the National Resources for Computations in Chemistry. The NRCC project (1 Oct 77 to 30 Sep 81) was funded by NSF and DOE, and was limited to the field of chemistry. The NRCC staff added new capabilities to GAMESS as well. Besides providing public access to the code on the CDC 7600 at the
site of the NRCC (the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), the NRCC made copies of the program source code (for a VAX) available to users at other sites.


It has grown and developed over the years with all the newfangled QM stuff included like DFT (Desnsity Functional Theory) but it is still at core a thirty year old program. You can get binary versions but I painstakingly compiled mine from the source code on Ubuntu Hardy. One of the reasons I stick with LTS, I don't have to rebuild it again. Anyway that's my personal computer game.

Reply Score: 2

Hypnos Member since:
2008-11-19

I work in physics, and use Gentoo. This has a few benefits:

* Many of the oldest, largest and most difficult to maintain math and physics packages (e.g., BLAS, PAW) are already in the main ebuild repository.

* If binary inconsistencies develop due to system updates, (usually) it's just a matter of doing a "revdep-rebuild" to reinstall affected packages.

* It's easy to maintain my own software by writing ebuilds and placing them in a local repository.

GAMESS is also in the main Gentoo repository.

Reply Score: 1

Windows 95?
by memson on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 12:38 UTC
memson
Member since:
2006-01-01

Most developers were running Windows NT 4.0 workstations. No one in any reasonably sized company was using Windows9x at that time.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Windows 95?
by B12 Simon on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 09:08 UTC in reply to "Windows 95?"
B12 Simon Member since:
2006-11-08

I was using NT4 at home til switching to Slackware about 4 years ago. On modern(ish) hardware it went like the proverbial off a shovel.

Reply Score: 2

PSP
by ultrabill on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 12:40 UTC
ultrabill
Member since:
2008-08-07

Still using Paint Shop Pro 7 (2000), as later versions were uselessly more complex. It still works on Win7, why would I have to change?

Reply Score: 5

RE: PSP
by Kroc on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:00 UTC in reply to "PSP"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

I stuck to PSP7 for ages, it certainly does get things done. Versions 8 and 9 were bloated and terribly disorganised. With version 10, Corel took over and put the app back on track making it more of a drawing tool than a photo tweaking app and the vectors were greatly enhanced so I switched over as I had pushed 7 to it's technical limits.

Version 11 they then lost the plot again (turning it back into a photo tweaker) and I haven't tried version 12 yet, but then 10 does everything I need and I suspect I will stick with it for another three years or more.

Reply Score: 1

RE: PSP
by biffuz on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:23 UTC in reply to "PSP"
biffuz Member since:
2006-03-27

I'm still using PSP 6 :-)

I liked it since version 2.something on my 286 and Windows 3.1, and up to 7, but I stick with 6. Didn't even look next versions.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: PSP
by JAlexoid on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 17:55 UTC in reply to "RE: PSP"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

I'm still using PSP 6 :-)

OMG! When did Sony get the time to release PlayStationPortable 6 ?!?!?!?!

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: PSP
by Cutterman on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 05:53 UTC in reply to "RE: PSP"
Cutterman Member since:
2006-04-10

PSP6 - yep, me too.

Quick, works like a charm, does everything I need.

Got PSP9, but its a dog.

Mac

Reply Score: 1

Lotus 123
by jimbofluffy on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 12:43 UTC
jimbofluffy
Member since:
2008-07-15

version 9.5 (1999). It gets done what I need a spreadsheet for in my XP VM, i.e. sorting data to be fed into/ out of Matlab, Eviews, etc.

Reply Score: 1

Let me see...
by memson on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 12:48 UTC
memson
Member since:
2006-01-01

Delphi used to be my main development platform for the longest time and I was stuck at Delphi 5.0 (1999) since release, because most companies decided to not update legacy code and develop new stuff in the emerging DotNet framework. I was still compiling legacy Delphi 5 apps in 2006, and I guess that company still does (as they were still selling Delphi based apps last time I checked.)

I ran BeOS for a long time as my main OS of choice at home.

I have a G3 powerbook and a G3 desktop Mac that still run Panther. I have a Mac 9500 that dual boots BeOS R5 and Mac OS 8.1 (might have 8.6 and/or 9.1 on it too, I forget.)

VB is a crappy language; I end up supporting code written by bad VB6 programmers who decided to move to VB.Net and make a real hash of it. It is quite frightening bad really.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Let me see...
by wawrzyn on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 18:09 UTC in reply to "Let me see..."
wawrzyn Member since:
2009-03-24

If you liked Delphi (back in time I was also using version 4, then 5 up to 2001), then you should try FPC (Free Pascal) + Lazarus IDE. It's in many ways even better (better licensing; free as a beer; a lot of components and code-base as it's very compatible with Delphi). You can also produce MS Windows, GNU Linux, FreeBSD (and more in fact) versions of your apps at the same time, because FPC/Lazarus is using "write once, compile anywhere" methodology. And one thing you can be sure - it's far more attractive than commercial Kylix was a few years ago, at least for GNU/Linux and MS Windows development. Try this:

http://lazarus.freepascal.org/

Moreover, it's definitely better option than Visual Basic 6 today, at least IMHO :-) And - what is sometimes very important - you can produce native code for given OS, not bytecode for anykind of virtual machine. For desktop applications it seems to be much better choice than Java, C# or VB.NET in many cases. Of course, it depends, but FPC/Lazaurs is still worth a try.

Personally, I like it.

Reply Score: 1

Windows 2000 Professional and Server
by DREVILl30564 on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 12:59 UTC
DREVILl30564
Member since:
2008-04-18

Does this count?

Some of the servers I manage are still running windows 2000 on them. It still does a great job for what the systems are being used for. I was one of the ones who won a free copy of windows 2000 professional in the prelaunch contest that microsoft had before it was released to the public. I ran it as my main OS on my home computer up until around the time Windows XP SP1 came out. I'm still using it on some of my older systems at home. I hate that Microsoft has pretty much pulled the plug on support for it. I still enjoy using it, and it's comfortable for me.

Reply Score: 2

Still have the old games
by vikramsharma on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:03 UTC
vikramsharma
Member since:
2005-07-06

I am still playing Unreal Tournament (1999 edition), Unreal Tournament 2003, Quake3 ,Max Payne 1&2, Soldier of Fortune II.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Still have the old games
by raffraffraff on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:50 UTC in reply to "Still have the old games"
raffraffraff Member since:
2009-04-02

Mostly old Windows applications or games that I still use occasionally. I run these Windows through Wine:

- Half-Life
- DVD Decrypter
- MP3Gain GUI
- MP3DirectCut
- BeSweet.exe
- MP4box.exe
- Exact Audio Copy + NeroAACEnc.exe

And I use these oldies natively in Linux:

- Quake 3
- Amarok 1.4.10 (not that old, but EOL)

Edited 2009-06-22 13:57 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Still have the old games
by korpenkraxar on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 20:32 UTC in reply to "RE: Still have the old games"
korpenkraxar Member since:
2005-09-10

+1 for Quake 3

Btw, do NES roms count? ;-)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Still have the old games
by friday on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 17:45 UTC in reply to "Still have the old games"
friday Member since:
2008-07-08

Carmageddon!
Richard Burns Rally
And Grand Prix Legends.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Still have the old games
by suryad on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:09 UTC in reply to "RE: Still have the old games"
suryad Member since:
2005-07-09

Carmageddon rocked! And so did the soundtrack!

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Still have the old games
by vikramsharma on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 01:47 UTC in reply to "RE: Still have the old games"
vikramsharma Member since:
2005-07-06

Forgot to mention Doom3, Age of Empires 1&2, Age of Mythology, Medal of Honor, Battlefield 1942, The Need for Speed series (awesome games imho). I still have the Nintendo console (the one with Mario Brothers, Galaxy and Battle Stations, anyone remember that)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Still have the old games
by biffuz on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 07:46 UTC in reply to "Still have the old games"
biffuz Member since:
2006-03-27

As for games, I still enjoy SimCity 2000 (1993, first game I bought with my own money). But I prefer SimCity 4 nowadays.
But in my hearth, nothing will replace Monkey Island and the other wonderful LucasArts adventures :-) Not even the remakes recently announced.

Reply Score: 1

Old stuff
by Glynser on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:07 UTC
Glynser
Member since:
2007-11-29

I am still using Windows XP ;)

Well, besides old games and so on, I also used VB6 for quite a long time (I stopped using it in 2005 or so). And I still use Office 2002 or 2003 (don't know actually).

Another thing is Micrografx Picture Publisher 7 or 8, I think 8, it's from maybe 2000 or so, and it's still my favourite picture editing software. Besides that, I also use MS Paint quite a lot. It's perfect for quick stuff, and if you really know how to use it, you can do a lot of things with it.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by LB06
by LB06 on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:13 UTC
LB06
Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm using several userland GNU or BSD tools which may or may not have been updated since 1960 ;) . But I guess they don't really count.

And I occasionally play a SNES game (on an up to date version of zsnes though), but apart from that, not really. I tend not to use software that is no longer maintained. I do use a lot of 'old' software, but all of them have been updated along the road at least a couple of times.

Reply Score: 3

Sheep Screenmate (POO)
by werfu on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:20 UTC
werfu
Member since:
2005-09-15

I mostly play old games using DosBox. Other than that... hum, I still have that screen mate sheep called poo. I've dumped the ressource from the executable a while ago in the goal of recoding the sceenmate, but I didn't had the time.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Sheep Screenmate (POO)
by arbour42 on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:55 UTC in reply to "Sheep Screenmate (POO)"
arbour42 Member since:
2005-07-06

You still have that little Sheep? that's amazing you mentioned it. I still let it walk around at times. The timestamp on mine says 1997 - i think i first ran it on a Win95 system.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Sheep Screenmate (POO)
by werfu on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 14:39 UTC in reply to "RE: Sheep Screenmate (POO)"
werfu Member since:
2005-09-15

I first run on 16 bits version of it on my old IBM PS/1 under Windows 3.0. The current version I have is a 32bits apps though. I think the author have updated it after 95.

Thinking of it, used to run the Sierra Screenantics Johny Castaway screen saver. They never made a 32bit version of it though. I could try to export all the ressources and recode it, or I could even decompile it. Win16 applications were far from complicated.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Sheep Screenmate (POO)
by Glynser on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 06:50 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Sheep Screenmate (POO)"
Glynser Member since:
2007-11-29

Ohh yes, Johnny Castaway was simply the best screensaver!

Reply Score: 1

Comment by Stephen!
by Stephen! on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:20 UTC
Stephen!
Member since:
2007-11-24

Windows 2000
Paintshop Pro 5
Photoshop Elements 2
DOGA-L1 (3D software)
DVD Shrink
DVD Decrypter
Ulead DVD Workshop 2
MPEG-VCR
WinDVD 2000

Reply Score: 1

Symantec Q&A for Dos
by systyrant on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:21 UTC
systyrant
Member since:
2007-01-18

Still works too.

Reply Score: 2

Basic windows apps
by Loki_999 on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:21 UTC
Loki_999
Member since:
2008-05-06

Notepad, calc, etc.... ok, maybe they have been recompiled since their origins but functionality has not changed.

Reply Score: 1

Starcraft
by HappyGod on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:23 UTC
HappyGod
Member since:
2005-10-19

In all its 640x480 pixel, 256 colour glory!

Still a cracker of a game though!

Reply Score: 6

RE: Starcraft
by MamiyaOtaru on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 14:57 UTC in reply to "Starcraft"
MamiyaOtaru Member since:
2005-11-11

When a game is this old and people still play it it should tell you something. Starcraft and UT99 all the time here.

Reply Score: 2

Surprised to see
by REM2000 on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:23 UTC
REM2000
Member since:
2006-07-25

some fellow readers using the same software

1. Paint Shop Pro 7, it's ultrafast, uses hardly any memory, nice streamlined interface and it simply gets the job done quickly.

2. Delphi 6, builds incredibly fast win32 apps and the IDE is nice and clean.

Reply Score: 2

ZOC
by dlundh on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:23 UTC
dlundh
Member since:
2007-03-29

I started using ZOC, Zap-O-Comm, back when it was available for OS/2.
Since then I've migrated to Windows where I ran it and lately Mac OS X which it was fairly recently ported to.

And yes, my registration number from the OS/2 days have been working all along!

It's a great terminal app as it supports everything from plain telnet to 5250 and 3270.

http://www.emtec.com/zoc/

Reply Score: 1

Comment by BiPolar
by BiPolar on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:26 UTC
BiPolar
Member since:
2007-07-06

Winamp 2.95

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by BiPolar
by bibe on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 19:55 UTC in reply to "Comment by BiPolar"
bibe Member since:
2005-07-09

Oh yes the last good clean fast audio focused no bullshit Winamp.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by BiPolar
by FreakyT on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 01:40 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by BiPolar"
FreakyT Member since:
2005-07-17

If you install the latest Winamp but don't install any of the useless extra plugins you basically get the same thing.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by BiPolar
by UltraZelda64 on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 02:19 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by BiPolar"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

If you install the latest Winamp but don't install any of the useless extra plugins you basically get the same thing.

Exactly... while getting all the latest bug/security fixes. There's very few programs I use "old versions" of, but there are a lot of programs that are old and I *would* still use. Would being the key word here... they're mostly for Windows, and since I made the decision to switch to Linux a couple years ago, I no longer am able to use them. Sure, there's Wine, but it seems to add some additional overhead (with only 256MB RAM) and some programs (Winamp included) don't run flawlessly in it last time I checked.

That said, I still have a directory with all the Windows programs I always liked, if only for nostalgia and in case I ever want to use them again. One standout program which hasn't been updated in a while is Metapad, an excellent Windows text editor, similar to Notepad with its interface and speed. Metapad development has stalled over the last few years, but its source code was recently put out under the GPL. Hopefully that paves the way for continued development/forks.

When it comes to old, unsupported proprietary software... various classic DOS games (with the help of DOSBox) and paid download copies of PerfectDisk 6 and Paint Shop Pro 8 are all that comes to mind. And considering there are alternatives to PSP (The GIMP) and defragmenting is really not that necessary outside of Windows, I don't even use those to programs any more. It's not like PerfectDisk would work outside of Windows anyway. ;) I do use xfs_fsr on my XFS-based drives to defrag every once in a while, though.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by BiPolar
by viton on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 19:07 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by BiPolar"
viton Member since:
2005-08-09

Oh yes the last good clean fast audio focused no bullshit Winamp.

Heh, the only good winamp was Winamp3 IMHO
2.x/5.x - unusable trash IMHO ^_^

foobar2k FTW!

Edited 2009-06-23 19:08 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by BiPolar
by Moochman on Wed 24th Jun 2009 09:34 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by BiPolar"
Moochman Member since:
2005-07-06

Winamp3 was horribly slow and the skins were 99% hideous.

I always thought it had potential, tho, and was surprised when they ditched it.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by BiPolar
by Michael Oliveira on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 21:10 UTC in reply to "Comment by BiPolar"
Michael Oliveira Member since:
2005-07-07

AIMP2

is the perfect replace for Winamp 2 series

Reply Score: 1

GoldED+
by croco on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:27 UTC
croco
Member since:
2005-09-16

GoldED+ ;) Thanks to Fido-Paket deluxe ( http://www.it-dienste.de/fpd/english.htm ) I'm still able to use Fido Netmail, Echos, VGA Planets and all that fun over Internet.

Reply Score: 2

X-Com: UFO Defense
by Ian Christie on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:36 UTC
Ian Christie
Member since:
2005-07-06

One of the best and classic turn based strategy games out there.

Reply Score: 3

RE: X-Com: UFO Defense
by pashar on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 14:29 UTC in reply to "X-Com: UFO Defense"
pashar Member since:
2006-07-12

Second that ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: X-Com: UFO Defense
by neuroscr on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:09 UTC in reply to "RE: X-Com: UFO Defense"
neuroscr Member since:
2009-06-22

There's a steam version which they ported it to dosbox and fixed up some bugs. I still play it too.

Reply Score: 1

RE: X-Com: UFO Defense
by wazoox on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 20:02 UTC in reply to "X-Com: UFO Defense"
wazoox Member since:
2005-07-14

Never got as good as UFO: Enemy unknown IMO.

Reply Score: 1

X-Com: Apocalypse
by stabbyjones on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 00:10 UTC in reply to "X-Com: UFO Defense"
stabbyjones Member since:
2008-04-15

I play this game almost every year start to finish. my cousin bought it new and i still have the copy he made for me well over a decade later.

best game ever!

Dos with a win 95 installer, needed a few patches for xp. needs even more now that i don't have windows.

it beats 1&2 for the sole reason that it had real time and was more visually appealing to me back then. tense soundtrack too.

Reply Score: 2

Delphi, Photoshop 7
by arbour42 on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:45 UTC
arbour42
Member since:
2005-07-06

It's great to see people here still using Delphi. I'm still using Delphi 6, and am maintaining apps I made back in '02, which run just fine.

It's amazingly sad, but nothing this decade comes close to the 15 year-old Delphi data-aware control framework. Nothing from .NET, or Java, or Flex or Javascript. Only MS Access comes close. I'm thinking of replicating the data part of the VCL in WPF 4 / Silverlight, but am only at the outlining stages.

I also just used Photoshop 7 for some graphics on a web site I just built. Is that old enough? It does everything I need.

Reply Score: 1

Not many
by Soulbender on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:46 UTC
Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

Other than old games probably none. I'm presuming that you mean software that havent been updated in the last 5 years and not software released more than 5 years ago that is still being updated.

Reply Score: 2

In education, almost everything is old ...
by MacTO on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:49 UTC
MacTO
Member since:
2006-09-21

Educational software publishers seem to treat software for the elementary grades like cartoons or books: kids won't notice how old it is and parents will treat it as classics, so why spend money even updating it. Just pull the oldest OS off of the system requirements and put the latest OS on the supported list. It doesn't matter if it won't work on new hardware because the new hardware is too fast or has too much RAM. It doesn't matter if it won't run on the newest OS because it requires access restricted to administrative users. Just say it's fine and hope that no one notices.

It wouldn't surprise me if there are still Windows 3.x programs on the market.

In reality I do use a lot of older software by choice. It doesn't make sense to use new software when the old stuff: (a) does everything I need and does it better, (b) works on my current hardware/OS, (c) doesn't consume resources for no apparent reason, (d) has a cleaner user interface, and (e) is cheaper.

Reply Score: 2

Photoshop 7.0
by remerico on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:54 UTC
remerico
Member since:
2005-07-06

I still use Photoshop 7.0 since I bought a copy way back 2002. It never failed me (aside from a few crashes) and I spent working my best art projects with it!

I remember it as a memory hog on my old 400Mhz celeron and 64mb memory. Now it runs blistering fast on my Core 2 Duo and 2GB RAM. Pure delight.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Photoshop 7.0
by RavinRay on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 14:14 UTC in reply to "Photoshop 7.0"
RavinRay Member since:
2005-11-26

Same here, along with its stablemates Illustrator 10 and InDesign 2.0.

Norton Commander for Windows 95 (believe it or not, most features still work on a NTFS drive under XP)

PC/Geos

Norton SystemWorks 2002. Though I've got 2005 as well.

Roxio's 5.0 suite, though I've got 8.0 as well.

Basically when I get a newer version of an app, the older one get a new lease on life on my older, 128MB RAM, AMD K6-II 400MHz enhanced Socket 7 system.

Reply Score: 1

A few
by fretinator on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 13:54 UTC
fretinator
Member since:
2005-07-06

Half-life 1 (About 12 years old now!) I run it in Crossover Games.

Jazz Jackrabbit - amazing scrolling on a 386! I run it in Dosbox.

Powerdesk - when I do the Windows thing, I like my Powerdesk - a NC style file manager. I've used it since version 1.

My dream is to get a laptop running with DOS and Wifi - there were a few 802.11b cards that had Dos drivers - and surf the web with Arachne. It's quite a challenge, because it is hard to get the PCMCIA stuff working under DOS. Plus, by the time you are done, you don't have much lower Dos memory left.

I definitely agree with the article about VB6. I could create fairly large projects very quickly. I had a pardigm down - the first thing I did was create a good class hierarchy for my app that did the saving and loading of data. The interface came second. To me, it was really a shame what Microsoft did to their "VB Guys". It didn't bother me, because I was also a Visual C++ and Java developer, so VB.Net was right up my alley. However, the simplicity of VB6 - IF USED WISELY - was a beautiful thing.

Also, having come from the DOS world, I really think Microsoft made a big mistake with Windows 95. They should have kept the separation between DOS and the graphical shell. That is why I am a Linux dude today. I have a full-powered OS apart from the graphical interface. The GUI is a convenience, not a necessity. Windows is just now getting back to that with Powershell and a non-gui server version of the OS. They should never have merged the GUI and the underlying OS. Bad things happen!

Reply Score: 2

Science software
by Bobthearch on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 14:10 UTC
Bobthearch
Member since:
2006-01-27

At work, most of the software is rather old and most of the computers run XP. Office 2000 and AutoCad 2000 are common. Also, most of the science software versions date to 1999 and older - Surfer, Matlab, etc.

Most of our computers (older laptops, older low-end desktops, and new netbooks) simply cannot run the newest versions of large software installations.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Science software
by LGordon on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 14:28 UTC in reply to "Science software"
LGordon Member since:
2005-10-25

My wife uses PAUP, which runs on Mac OS Classic, but since she got a new Intel Mac recently, I had to get SheepShaver with Mac OS 9 working for her. I was surprised to find out from her that its been pretty stable - she can keep SheepShaver open for days on end!

Reply Score: 1

My list (non-games)
by dylansmrjones on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 14:10 UTC
dylansmrjones
Member since:
2005-10-02

Windows Server 2003 (6 years, but it still receive updates).
Borland Delphi 7 - occasionally issues with security settings (file permissions) when running as 'standard user'.
MP Compressor (1997) - butt old but works, but it has issues with security settings (file permissions) when running as 'standard user'.
Autocad 2002 - it has issues with security settings when running as 'standard user' (file permissions and read/write access to privileged areas in the registry database)
Parts of Office XP and parts of Office 2003 (a matter of licensing issues - I'm not using warez, so I'm using a blend of what I'm allowed to).

Don't get me started on games...

EDIT: On Linux everything is reasonably new, though Firestarter is beginning to look old ;)

Edited 2009-06-22 14:13 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Governa
Member since:
2006-04-09

Nice topic Kroc!

I have moved on regarding a lot of old software that doesn't have a compatible version for today's modern operating systems.

On the Mac, I remember using Corel WordPerfect for a long time, Eudora Lite was a regular too at University... Claris software was also pretty solid and straightforward. I recall ClarisWorks (later AppleWorks), Claris Em@iler, HyperCard... good old times.

On Windows, I remember holding on to some old versions of ACDSee, Nero and Paintshop Pro 7, as later versions just added a lot of unnecessary (at least to me) fat and complexity. DVD Shrink was also very useful for a long, long time.

Nowadays the only old software that I still run (occasionally) are two Windows games via Parallels (with an nLited XP). I still enjoy playing C&C Red Alert 2 (Yuri's) in Skirmish mode and still hold on to Football Manager 2005 (have a saved game on the 20th season or something). They run fine, it's a shame I have less and less time to play anything more than a casual game on the iPhone or the Nintendo DS...

Edited 2009-06-22 14:31 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Windows Cardfile
by juandelach on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 14:25 UTC
juandelach
Member since:
2007-03-22

I'm still using win3.x cardfile. It runs fine in win7. Doom and Doom 2.

And OS/2 Warp in a vm.

Reply Score: 1

middleware
Member since:
2006-05-11

As a non-English-speaker, you would find there are few old application is ready for your language. Unicode-aware software appear only these recent one or two years. Windows XP, even Vista still can't process a lot non-English characters correctly. Word calculating, correct way to delete single character, auto-wrapping, all these for non-English languages are only available in recent few years.

Reply Score: 2

WinTV
by knightrider on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 14:43 UTC
knightrider
Member since:
2006-12-11

I still use WinTV. Problem is Windows 7 doesn't seem to support it.

Reply Score: 1

RE: WinTV
by bibe on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 20:01 UTC in reply to "WinTV"
bibe Member since:
2005-07-09

Huh try Dscaler if u are using analog TV card, I didn't knew how fast my WinTV card can be till I found it.

http://deinterlace.sourceforge.net/

Reply Score: 1

VB6
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 14:54 UTC
Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

I used to work in VB6 as my primary language. I think it was pretty harmful to my mind programming for it. The easy things were easy, but the moderately difficult things were impossibly hard. Usually requiring one to call a win32 api call, and guess how the variables would be translated. Some api calls were impossible to make, because the used pointers. Dealing with XML, Web services was a pain in the but. Creating anything but the most basic interfaces was impossible. Third party libraries were unreliable, poorly coded, highly restrictive and ugly.

I don't live in a Microsoft world, I jumped ship shortly after .net. Maybe the current Visual studio Interface is worse. But, I can't imagine its more difficult for people to learn. You can still just draw a form add controls double click on the control and modify its behavior when clicked, right? I thought most people moved on to C# with out too much trouble. Its still not nearly as bad as Java, from my point of view.

Reply Score: 3

ACDSee Classic
by erikharmon on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 15:06 UTC
erikharmon
Member since:
2007-06-20

Image viewer for Windows from about year 2000. It's fast and it does ONE thing only, views pictures. ACDSystems updated it, but added image management and editing features and it's slow and junky in my opinion.

I even use it on Linux via WINE, even being non-native it's faster and better designed than any other image viewer on Linux I've used.

Reply Score: 2

nedit
by FunkyELF on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 15:16 UTC
FunkyELF
Member since:
2006-07-26

I depend on nedit's macros. It just replays keystrokes but you combine this with ctrl-f for find and other things and it can be pretty powerful. On Windows TextPad has this capability. I would switch to something more modern if they had record / playback.

Reply Score: 2

RE: nedit
by AnyoneEB on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 00:58 UTC in reply to "nedit"
AnyoneEB Member since:
2008-10-26

I had never heard of NEdit, but Vim/GVim's macros are implemented by recording (q) into a copy buffer and playing back (@) the contents of a copy buffer. You could do the type of macro you describe by using a regexp search (/) or single character search (f) depending on the situation. Of course, Vim's commands take some time to learn and if you are comfortable with NEdit there is probably no compelling reason to switch to a different text editor. (And, to be balanced, I would be surprised if Emacs lacked such a simple feature as recording macros.)

Reply Score: 1

Daytimer Organizer from 1999
by rycamor on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 15:28 UTC
rycamor
Member since:
2005-07-18

My wife still uses the old Daytimer organizer from 1999, and has never once wanted an updated version. It was first installed on her Windows 98 system, and has since lived through Windows 2000, Windows XP, and now Windows Vista. I never bother to run the install software, either. I just copy the files into place and put a shortcut to the .exe file on her desktop. No registry crap, no hidden programs running in the background to 'provide critical updates'(er... spyware), etc...

The fact that the software just WORKS across multiple versions of Windows, and that it starts up in less than a second makes me wonder whatever happened to software development. Isn't it the faintest bit possible that we have overcomplicated things to the point of absurdity?

Oh, and get off my lawn, you kids.

Edited 2009-06-22 15:28 UTC

Reply Score: 4

None
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 15:29 UTC
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

Nothing old here.

Although you could make a case that Miranda is a very classic IM application - that is, small and without useless fluff and bullshit. It's completely modern, though, code-wise.

Reply Score: 1

Lotus Organizer 6.1
by tecepeipe on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 15:40 UTC
tecepeipe
Member since:
2005-07-07

I stil use Lotus Organizer 6 and won't move to anything else.
It's pretty beautiful, small, quick, produces a small file easy to backup. Support several output formats to export so I can easily upload to google calendar, gmail contacts, cell phones, palm, etc.

If my PDA/IPhone supports sync with Lotus, ok
but if it wasn't supported, I create a .csv file, load it into my PDA and won't sincronize again (as it is full loaded with my contacts already)

Irfanview32 is still updated but its classic interface makes it eligible to be included in this topic. ;)

Reply Score: 1

Let me think ..
by Aeko on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 15:49 UTC
Aeko
Member since:
2007-10-20

Here at work:

RM/COBOL-85 Runtime (Version 4.10.02) for DOS 2.00+. Configured for 001 user.
(c) Copyright 1985, 1989 by Ryan McFarland Corp. All rights reserved.

CLEAR ? ;)

also:

· Autocad R14, most of time typing commands, as old-skool style.

· Winamp 2.91

And somthing sure I left, but it hasn't to be really important.

kisses

Reply Score: 1

RE: Let me think ..
by dylansmrjones on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 02:09 UTC in reply to "Let me think .."
dylansmrjones Member since:
2005-10-02

Ohh.. still using R14 ;)

IMHO the best Autocad I've ever used ;)

EDIT: A little bit of mouse is okay. Like l[space]int[space][mouse click]end[mouse click][space] - the faster way to draw from intersection of to end point of ;)

Edited 2009-06-23 02:14 UTC

Reply Score: 2

LambdaMOO
by protomank on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 15:49 UTC
protomank
Member since:
2006-08-03

My home computer still runs a lambdaMOO server. It is a kind of MUD (precursor of Wow for people born in this century)for social and programming purposes.

Reply Score: 2

Just few
by Ikshaar on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 15:51 UTC
Ikshaar
Member since:
2005-07-14

Windows XP
Anjuta 1.x (IDE linux) - too many functions broke in new version
and few old games
Fury of Furies
Magic the Gathering

Reply Score: 1

what I use
by elanthis on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 15:51 UTC
elanthis
Member since:
2007-02-17

Assuming you mean "software that hasn't been updated in over 5 years" and not "any software originally created over 5 years ago," my list pretty much comes down to a number of games. Which, incidentally, is the primary reason I dual-boot (which I wish I didn't have to do).

I can't think of a single person I've met who owns a PC (including my parents and grandparents) who doesn't play at least one or two PC games. I'm consistently irritated by how the Linux desktop developers and companies seem to think games are unimportant and that 95% of people just use computers for Web and email. I think most hardcore Linux users are not heavy game players (if they were, they probably wouldn't be hardcore Linux users) and so they have a tough time grasping the fact that most everyone else _is_ a gamer to some degree. This is pretty similar to how most Linux developers have a tough time with good UIs because we have a different idea of "good UI" than most regular users (I prefer a Bash shell, but naturally most people do not).

Reply Score: 1

RE: what I use
by knightrider on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 16:43 UTC in reply to "what I use"
knightrider Member since:
2006-12-11

There are games out there for linux.

http://www.linuxgames.com/

Reply Score: 1

Great thread!
by Tuishimi on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 15:57 UTC
Tuishimi
Member since:
2005-07-06

This is a fun article. ;)

Oh I wish I still had boxes dedicated to BeOS, OS/2, etc. I just don't have the room. For work they seem to think that we need to constantly push the technology bubble so we are always using the latest and greatest... too bad.

I guess the only "old" software I am using right now is Euphoria 3. Otherwise, only games... I am running Windows 7 on my main box right now. Had OS X running as well but could not get Windows to play well with the boot manager.

Reply Score: 2

Wait, what? VB6?
by MORB on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 15:58 UTC
MORB
Member since:
2005-07-06

I had the displeasure of using vb 6 once or twice to debug some old crap lying around.

To me it's more like the kind of software that leaves you wondering "how can anyone ever possibly think this thing was any good?"

Then again there are people who are praising each horrible new iteration of visual studio, people who use digital watches, etc. so it's not really surprising.

Reply Score: 2

NEdit 5.5 (2004)_
by cjcoats on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 16:08 UTC
cjcoats
Member since:
2006-04-16

(a) Cross platform -- none of the other ones run on Linux, AIX, Solaris, HPux, and even the occasional
IRIX machines I have to use;
(b) Faster than the Gnome and KDE programming editors,
especially for large files;
(c) Better programming-language support for languages
used in HPCC and environmental modeling;
(d) My fingers are already trained for it :-)

Reply Score: 1

Comment by madcrow
by madcrow on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 16:08 UTC
madcrow
Member since:
2006-03-13

I run TOPS-20 7.0 in a PDP-10 emulator. Great OS with one of the best thought out and well-implemented command lines ever. It even does TCP/IP, so if I could figure out how to get it's pre-DHCP network stack to talk to my crappy Westell Verizon router...

Reply Score: 2

What i use
by dmc_dtc on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 16:13 UTC
dmc_dtc
Member since:
2005-07-07

Redhat 6.0 on my main dual core 5Gb rama desktop!! ;) it is upgraded a lot from i guess almost 10 years since i installed it.. but many of the original programs still have year2000 /1999 on them ;) So you can imagine how much of the old software is now collected on this 10+ years long instalation.. one of the thing is gnome 1.x ;) and netscape3? ;) but i dont really use it, but it is fun to see sometimes how modern pages just dont work ;)

root@serenity /: # cat /etc/redhat-release
Red Hat Linux release 6.0 (Hedwig)
root@serenity /: # uname -a
Linux serenity.localdomain 2.6.24 #1 SMP PREEMPT Sat Dec 20 11:07:19 CET 2008 i686 unknown

Edited 2009-06-22 16:15 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: What i use
by StephenBeDoper on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:25 UTC in reply to "What i use"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

I have an old Linux install kicking around that's almost that old (Mandrake 6.1), running on an P3 450. It's serving some old Perl/MySQL web app written by a developer who is now long-gone.

Reply Score: 2

RE: What i use
by Jonix on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:31 UTC in reply to "What i use"
Jonix Member since:
2007-02-14

We wont to see your uptime

Reply Score: 1

XV
by bert64 on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 16:43 UTC
bert64
Member since:
2007-04-23

I still use the xv image viewer, the latest version of which came out in 1994 i believe... It's an image viewer for X11 and has very good keyboard controls, including the option to zoom to full screen while retaining the aspect ratio and not having any gui elements taking up parts of the screen you would be using to view the image.

Reply Score: 1

Me, too: XV
by cjcoats on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 16:47 UTC in reply to "XV"
cjcoats Member since:
2006-04-16

...forgot about that one!

Reply Score: 1

CodeWarrior, never let go
by transputer_guy on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 17:29 UTC
transputer_guy
Member since:
2005-07-08

Until a few weeks ago, I was still using Win2000 for various reasons, mostly refusal to give MS any more $ for functions I didn't want like activation, DRM and useless eye candy but I did badly want hardware drivers. That old OS let me run lots of old developer tools. Most of my code work is on the CodeWarrior IDE which I fell in love with under MacOS 8.x and then BeOS too. When I went to Win2K I sort of liked VC6 but I found it rather MS centric. I found CodeWarrior had long died off in 2002 when Motorola took over so I got the windows version from a torrent. Thank goodness some old software can be found on torrents (I did pay boatloads for the old MacOS licenses so I could care less).


A new mobo and quadcore forced me to switch to Vista and OSX. Luckily Vista runs most of the old stuff just fine, CW8, Textpad, Winamp with a few updates. OSX though everything is always spanky clean. When I fire up BeOS on an 10yr old kit, every thing is old but small lean and mean!

Reply Score: 2

Corel 6
by sdodds on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 17:33 UTC
sdodds
Member since:
2009-06-22

CorelDraw and Corel Paint. 1996-ish I believe. I prefer the object manipulation in this version versus the layers in Photoshop and CorelPaint 9 which I also bought, maybe because I can't find the time to learn 'the new way'. The only thing that doesn't work is the file browser window which doesn't allow me to change 'views' (details, icons, list, etc)

Reply Score: 1

Amos BASIC Professional
by SamuraiCrow on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 17:37 UTC
SamuraiCrow
Member since:
2005-11-19

I use AmosPro under EUAE running AmigaOS 3.9 on my Mac. The orange, yellow and cyan GUI hasn't aged well. (The default GUI colors were unpopular when Amos first came out also.) It accesses graphics acceleration features that are not present on modern GPUs also.

A friend and I am trying to make a new replacement for it but it has proved to be more difficult than we had planned. AmosPro had the unique ability to add commands to the language by using an extension written in raw 68000 machine language. Hopefully our Mattathias BASIC will be able to do everything that AmosPro did.

Reply Score: 2

Painter 6
by neuroscr on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:05 UTC
neuroscr
Member since:
2009-06-22

Back when it was by meta creations. They had a version that worked with a tablet and the brushed worked in an amazing way which they haven't been able to duplicate or bring back since (despite the cries of many users in various art forums). It also had a funny bug, it would crash if you had more than 512mb without a patch they had provided separately. Getting this to work in parallels with the proper tablet support is hit and miss.

Reply Score: 2

BeOS
by paws on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:09 UTC
paws
Member since:
2007-05-28

I still use BeOS loads. Also playing with Haiku.

There's also a PowerBook here with Codewarrior and such on it that is nice for playing with C/C++. I don't know either that well yet, and when I take some time to muck about with them I usually turn to CW to engage in some nostalgia as well.

Same PowerBook G3 has the SCSI remote control software for my Yamaha A5k sampler on it, as that is OS9 only, and Logic 4.8.something.

I think I've got Win2k on one of the drives in my old Compaq tower, but I don't use it for anything. That tower also has NeXTStep/Intel on it, but I only tried it a few times and decided I didn't like the GUI, and besides I don't have any apps for.

Reply Score: 1

RE: BeOS
by StephenBeDoper on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:21 UTC in reply to "BeOS"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

I still use BeOS loads. Also playing with Haiku.


Ditto. I have yet to find an MP3 player that I like as much as SoundPlay, or a text editor as nice as Pe. And for my tastes, Vision is as close to perfect as any IRC client on any OS.

Reply Score: 3

Brief
by Jonix on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:16 UTC
Jonix
Member since:
2007-02-14

A few seconds ago, I heard that from the Security Now podcast (episode 200) that Steve Gibson, are still using the Brief Editor to code Assembly.

It amazes me that a 20 year old DOS editor works in a modern Windows version.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Brief
by dragossh on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 07:33 UTC in reply to "Brief"
dragossh Member since:
2008-12-16

That’s Microsoft for you. I believe they virtualize DOS though.

Reply Score: 1

OS/2 Warp 4
by Jonix on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:18 UTC
Jonix
Member since:
2007-02-14

On occasion I use and really love OS/2 Warp 4.

The funny thing is that last year I bought a Mac Mini and Parallels VM to run OS/2 on.

Reply Score: 1

Steinberg Clean
by Hae-Yu on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:19 UTC
Hae-Yu
Member since:
2006-01-12

I use a program called Steinberg Clean Plus (2003) to automatically clean the pops, clicks, and noise when ripping vinyl to wav. Its UI is clumsy and most other features are half-baked, but it can't be beat for automating the cleaning process.

I tried using GoldWave, WavLab, and Audacity, but who has time to go through every pop on every track on every record? It's a two hour chore to rip a record (and tweak the audio levels/ restart the recording) and encode/ label the files. Manually cleaning each album takes all day. Clean automates the cleaning process and does it with better quality and more customization than any other automated system I've found.

It also came with a very good preamp (the Plus) to connect a regular turntable to the line-in. The preamp alone was worth the $50 cost of the whole package.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Steinberg Clean
by StephenBeDoper on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 19:41 UTC in reply to "Steinberg Clean"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

I use a program called Steinberg Clean Plus (2003) to automatically clean the pops, clicks, and noise when ripping vinyl to wav.


That's funny - some friends of mine just asked me to convert some old vinyl to CD for them, and they specifically said not to remove the pops and clicks ;) (of course, these are folks who constantly pontificate about the superiority of vinyl - yet never seem willing to do a simple double-blind test).

Reply Score: 2

Day of the tentacle
by Jonix on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:29 UTC
Jonix
Member since:
2007-02-14

Every year or so I spend a few nights playing the classical Lucas Arts game, such as Day of the Tentacle, Pirate of the Carribean, etc.

Also some of the earlier Sierra Online games, such as Heroes Quest (Quest for glory), Kings Quest 3.

Thanks to the ScummVM it still works under Windows, and even for GNU/Linux and Mac OS X.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Day of the tentacle
by StephenBeDoper on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 20:01 UTC in reply to "Day of the tentacle"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

Every year or so I spend a few nights playing the classical Lucas Arts game, such as Day of the Tentacle, Pirate of the Carribean, etc.


The Dig is still fun too (except for the bloody "re-assemble the fish skeleton puzzle," grrrr).

Reply Score: 2

RE: Day of the tentacle
by Moochman on Wed 24th Jun 2009 09:44 UTC in reply to "Day of the tentacle"
Moochman Member since:
2005-07-06

Every year or so I spend a few nights playing the classical Lucas Arts game, such as Day of the Tentacle, Pirate of the Carribean, etc.


I take it that by "Pirate of the Carribean" you mean the Monkey Island games.

I'm a big fan of them myself. Getting excited about the new MI games coming up:

http://www.worldofmi.com/

and the remake of MI one LucasArts is putting out:
http://www.lucasarts.com/games/monkeyisland/

Edited 2009-06-24 09:45 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Day of the tentacle
by Jonix on Wed 24th Jun 2009 10:20 UTC in reply to "RE: Day of the tentacle"
Jonix Member since:
2007-02-14

Of course so silly of me. Mea culpa.

Edited 2009-06-24 10:26 UTC

Reply Score: 1

Comment by Elv13
by Elv13 on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:31 UTC
Elv13
Member since:
2006-06-12

XMMS (1.2)
EmelFM (1)
Aterm
XPdf
Xv
XFig
Fontforge
My system have both dinosaurs and bleeding edge svn build, it feel strange. But I like those old apps, the work so fast on modern system and have all feature I need.

Anybody know some other useful apps as fast as those to replace some of the modern slow beast?

Reply Score: 1

Old software
by morglum666 on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:53 UTC
morglum666
Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm hoping that I haven't reached the crusty age where everything built after my time is "just bloat" ;)

- I still use microsoft paint extensively.
- Nethack from time to time
- Power defragmenter - costs nothing, works as well as any commercial product. Google it.
- I still use windows XP at work ;) . I'd have something modern, but the ERP app isn't certified with anything newer.
- VI. Vi forever!!

Other than that, I like to try the latest and greatest of everything. That's the fun part.

Edited 2009-06-22 18:54 UTC

Reply Score: 1

dictionnary
by po134 on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 18:54 UTC
po134
Member since:
2009-05-15

I have an old software that is a 5 langauge dictionnary from microsoft (biblirom larousse) in its 2000 edition (last one ?) and it works like a charm (on win XP) and I am missing it since I moved to vista (had to with the new hardware, xp would have sucked), amd am waiting xp mode on seven ;) ! (gonna install it soon)

I'm also addicted to "foldersize" although not a very old software it has been around since win xp only but doesn't wok on vista/seven and I am missing this feature so much I have to use a VM to "explore" my HDs, damn microsoft :/

Reply Score: 1

RE: dictionnary
by Elv13 on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 00:41 UTC in reply to "dictionnary"
Elv13 Member since:
2006-06-12

+1, it was great

Reply Score: 1

Let's see...
by mpxlbs on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 19:30 UTC
mpxlbs
Member since:
2009-01-25

I got this old Olivetti computer that's in use.
Got some other computers aswell...

I'm running
Freedos
MS.Dos 6.22 with and without windows 3.11/95/98/workstation 6 (dos shell)
Beos r5
Windows 2 (virtualized)
Haiku

Old games?

Bouncing Babies!
http://www.dosgamesarchive.com/download/bouncing-babies/

Reply Score: 1

PSP
by drcursor on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 19:30 UTC
drcursor
Member since:
2009-06-22

- Paint Shop Pro 7 (using since it was an image processing utility in version 1.0 - used it to create a animated gif (or something like that) made out of iff images captured in an Amiga!!!)
- Powermenu
- Old VNC Client
- Keynote [ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keynote_(notetaking_software) ] but dumping it for notepad + dropbox
- many small utilities in linux

Reply Score: 1

Some old Amiga-stuff
by fx__ on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 19:33 UTC
fx__
Member since:
2006-03-31

I still use Brilliance on my old 40MHz Amiga 4000 whenever I want to pixel something. None of the newer paint-programs I have tried has come close to it in terms of ease of use when creating tile-based graphics with low color-depth.

I also use Directory Opus 4 quite a lot and I think it's the best filemanager ever! Lots of things to configure and very powerful! And quick, and easy to use, I just love it ;)

AmosPro, it's the first programming language I ever really used (sure, I spent some time with the C64's basic interpreter, but never did anything serious with it). If I ever feel creative and want to throw something together really quick, I always end up making it in AMOS. To bad it hasn't been updated since '94 (I think).

Edited 2009-06-22 19:34 UTC

Reply Score: 1

Kings Quest
by YNOP on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 19:36 UTC
YNOP
Member since:
2005-07-02

Kings Quest / Space Quest and Hitchhikers guide on Apple IIe. - and if i could find that damn boot floppy maybe some Larry Bird vs Doc J ;) ...

Ofcourse all the BeOS software i still uses counts too, right ;)

Reply Score: 1

More than I thought...
by StephenBeDoper on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 19:59 UTC
StephenBeDoper
Member since:
2005-07-06

As with a few other people here, I'm still using Photoshop 7 (and the contemporary version of Illustrator - AI 10). There's a copy of MS Works 2.0 (16-bit) that I still have kicking around, just about the only MS word processor that I can tolerate for actual *writing* - although it's certainly showing its age (no "squiggly-underline" spell checking, no auto-pagination, etc). Some ancient version of QuickBooks, an old 6.x version of Nero Express (can't stand the UI of newer versions), and an old HTML/code editor called Arachnophilia (there's an updated Java version, but I prefer the old Win32 version).

With games, I actually tend to *prefer* older ones. Jedi Outcast, Quake 1 (nothing beats it for some mindless deathmatch, IMO), Homeworld, Virtual Pool 3, Max Payne, etc. Oh, and a game that me and a few friends came up with - "car surfing" in GTA3 (jump on top of a car, shoot it, then try to stay on as long as possible).

Reply Score: 2

old or obsolete?
by JMcCarthy on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 20:15 UTC
JMcCarthy
Member since:
2005-08-12

I use plenty of old software, but I don't think I really use anything obsolete; something that's been replaced by something newer and "better."

It's always tempting when something goes bloat though.

Reply Score: 2

RE: old or obsolete?
by ssa2204 on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 20:29 UTC in reply to "old or obsolete?"
ssa2204 Member since:
2006-04-22

I still play a lot of old games:
Panzer General II - 1997
Diablo II -2000
Close Combat - 97-2000
Heroes of Might and Magic - 95-2002

When compared to today's games, these certainly do not stack up when comparing the graphics, but the gameplay is hands down superior. The gaming industry it seems as a whole has decided to put everything into bright shiny FX, and spend little to no time developing the gameplay. The last Heroes game was so devoid of any AI, they just simply wrote it to cheat to provide a challenge.

Reply Score: 2

Paint Shop Pro 5
by Eugenia on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 20:37 UTC
Eugenia
Member since:
2005-06-28

I still use PaintShopPro 5, that came out in 1998. I don't like any other image manipulation software for quick editing, not even the newer versions of the said software (I had bought a newer version, I uninstalled it, and went back to PSP5). I do use Photoshop or Gimp for more involved things, but for 99% of the stuff I do with images usually, PSP5 does it near-perfectly for me.

Reply Score: 1

nvi
by jarlea on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 21:09 UTC
jarlea
Member since:
2006-05-09

I use nvi version 1.79 (released in 1996) daily at work. Vim is my IDE, but because of all the vim scripts/plugins loading at startup, nvi is much quicker to use for those quick edits in the terminal.

Reply Score: 1

Mac OS 9
by rajan r on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 21:42 UTC
rajan r
Member since:
2005-07-27

If my MacBook could run it natively, I mean. OS 9 was the last OS by Apple before they replaced thought, consistency and usability with ohhh-coool-flashy-graphics.

Its been years, and still many of the US features of OS 9 has not reached OS X (and some of those that did, like spatial Finder, has been botched up royally by Apple)

Reply Score: 1

Here is my list
by bassbeast on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 22:00 UTC
bassbeast
Member since:
2007-11-11

VB6, MS Office 2K, an old disk catalogging software from 2001(if anybody knows a good free disc catalogger that works in XP X64 let me know) plus a ton of old games like Deus Ex. Funny that the author mentions that he would never use Win9X anymore, when I actually keep a 733Mhz with Win98 around just for the old stuff that won't run on XP.

For example the box set for Medal of Honor includes two expansion packs for MoH that I have never been able to get to run in XP32, much less XP X64. By keeping an old 733Mhz around I am able to use this software(which I bought new last year and it STILL doesn't work in XP! WTF?) and get my monies worth. If it ain't broke, why fix it?

Reply Score: 1

Nethack and IrcII
by dtarsky on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 22:45 UTC
dtarsky
Member since:
2009-06-22

I still fire up Nethack once in a while but still can't get very far without enabling Wizard mode.

When I want to go into IRC I still use the good old original text-based IrcII. No reason really for the flashy GUI stuff in a chat channel.

Reply Score: 1

Fun Stuffs
by weildish on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 22:48 UTC
weildish
Member since:
2008-12-06

When I've a bit of spare time, I sometimes pull out the old NES or SNES emulators. I've also got a Macintosh Plus that I pulled out for the first time in years and found some of my most favorite games in the entire history of the universe on it: Arkanoid and MacMissiles. Risk was pretty fun, too, all in its glorious black-and-white beauty. On the Plus I also have Microsoft Word 5.0 as well as Excel that I used pretty frequently up until 2002 or 2003. Not to mention the original Hypercard. I felt so special that I could program in Hypercard. ;) Oh, and the Plus runs system 6.0.2. How lovely.

Reply Score: 1

nvi
by sweetnavelorange on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 23:00 UTC
sweetnavelorange
Member since:
2009-05-05

Several bits of FreeBSD might be older, but nvi is one I use every day, which looking at the CVS changelog has been almost unchanged since 1996.

Reply Score: 1

Think Pascal
by msieweke on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 23:04 UTC
msieweke
Member since:
2006-07-18

I'm using Think Pascal for a hobby compiler project. It's still my favorite IDE, even though it hasn't been updated (or sold) for about 15 years. It's all 68000-based code for MacOS 6/7, so it runs in a CPU emulator in an emulated OS on my PowerPC Mac with MacOS 10.4.

I occasionally use an EDT editor clone based on the VAX/VMS editor from the 80's.

Reply Score: 1

FrameMaker
by twm_bucket on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 23:42 UTC
twm_bucket
Member since:
2008-10-09

FrameMaker 5.5. It works on Irix and I use it everyday.

Reply Score: 1

Master of Magic
by soulrebel123 on Mon 22nd Jun 2009 23:54 UTC
soulrebel123
Member since:
2009-05-13

best strategy game ever, '95, running in dosbox.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Spinfusor
by Spinfusor on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 00:01 UTC
Spinfusor
Member since:
2007-01-11

The oldest non-game software I use at home is Maya 8 (2006). At work, I use Dreamweaver 4 and Photoshop 6 (both 2000).

As for old games, I still play the Windows Entertainment Pack version of Tetris (1990).

Reply Score: 1

Big list...
by malxau on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 02:27 UTC
malxau
Member since:
2005-12-04

Let's see...

1. Visual C++ 6 (uses MSVCRT.DLL, enabling small/compact apps that don't require install)
2. Windows 2000 (relatively fast, clear/professional UI)
3. Quake 3
4. Gimp 1.2.5 (GTK 1 is cleaner/faster than what followed, and Gimp was functional enough back then)
5. Acrobat 5.x (Huge plugin loadtime in 6.x, "Do you want Javascript with that?" in 7.x...you have to wonder)
6. Office 2003 (as opposed to the UI from hell)
7. StarOffice 7 (smaller/faster, and not seeing good reasons to upgrade)
8. FVWM (no new releases because it's already perfect)
9. Half Life 1 (awesome gameplay with lousy technology beats the other way every time)

Reply Score: 1

16-bit Software
by timhiggison on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 02:45 UTC
timhiggison
Member since:
2009-06-23

Bow to me. I still use Visual Basic 3.0 - yes you read that right, 3.0 - on a daily basis. Released in 1993, the last fully 16-bit VB development environment. Also we use Visual C++ 1.52 to write DLLs for VB3 code.

We use them because we have a large amount of legacy code written in VB3 and VC++1.52 and porting from 16-bit to 32-bit is prohibitively risky and expensive.

All I can say is thanks to Microsoft for continuing 16-bit emulation in even the latest versions of Windows!

http://hexadeciman.blogspot.com/

Reply Score: 1

RE: 16-bit Software
by malxau on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 03:08 UTC in reply to "16-bit Software"
malxau Member since:
2005-12-04

Unfortunately 16 bit support is reaching the end of the road. XP 64 bit edition dropped support for 16 bit apps; support for 16 bit apps only exists in Vista/Win7 32-bit editions. Note that there is no 32-bit version of Win7 server.

As PCs approach (and exceed) the 4Gb barrier, more OEMs will move to 64-bit editions, and 16 bit support will end with a slow transition.

Unless working in a virtualized environment is suitable for you, 16-bit support is not a good long term choice.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: 16-bit Software
by timhiggison on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 09:07 UTC in reply to "RE: 16-bit Software"
timhiggison Member since:
2009-06-23

Believe me, I couldn't agree with you more. Considering 90% of our customer base (mechanics and car dealerships worldwide) are using Windows 95/98/2K and have no reason or want to upgrade, I think we'll be safe for a while.

Sometimes it's hard to remember that the whole world isn't on the cutting edge like us programmers :-)

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: 16-bit Software
by neozeed on Fri 26th Jun 2009 13:27 UTC in reply to "RE: 16-bit Software"
neozeed Member since:
2006-03-03

Luckily in Windows 7, there is the 'seamless' Windows XP which can run win16 stuff..

I still use.... QuickC for Windows..

Becuase it's got a good help system, and it's SMALL, only 4 1.44 MB floppies!

I just wish the debugger ran properly, but for that I end up with Virtual PC, MS-DOS 5, Windows 3.0 ....

Reply Score: 1

VB6 here also
by SoloDeveloper on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 02:49 UTC
SoloDeveloper
Member since:
2008-03-16

I cannot, and almost refuse to use .net. i prefer my "old" vb6. i use it ever. single. day. i write code just as often.

.net is NOT what it should have been. Ms made a mistake.

Reply Score: 1

vb6 TABS in IDE addin
by SoloDeveloper on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 03:01 UTC
SoloDeveloper
Member since:
2008-03-16

Have Tabs in your vb6 ide, like firefox. see here.
http://planetsourcecode.com/vb/scripts/ShowCode.asp?txtCodeId=62468...

Reply Score: 1

The ancient-but-reliable "sc" spreadsheet
by obsidian on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 05:40 UTC
obsidian
Member since:
2007-05-12

Good old "sc" - one of my public-domain favourites!

I have a real soft spot for **really old** apps like this. There's humour in the "readme" too - have a look at the "guarantee" -
*********************
Guarantee:

Since some people are wary of using a program that has no guarantee, I've decided to provide the following guarantee:

It is a well-known fact that any non-trivial program has bugs. If you haven't found them, you just haven't stumbled upon the proper combinations of actions that will cause the bugs to manifest themselves. Since sc stands for "Spreadsheet Calculator", and since a
spreadsheet calculator is by definition a non-trivial program, sc is guaranteed to have bugs.
****************************
... ;)

Reply Score: 2

Christian Paratschek
Member since:
2005-07-06

Diablo II

Still, for me the best game ever made.

Hardcore mode (meaning that your character has just one life and if he ever dies, he'll be gone and you'll have to start a whole new character) is the most challenging thing I have ever seen in a computer game. You'll play a char for months and then you'll make one single mistake and that's it - he's dead.

Beats WOW any day!

Reply Score: 2

Homesite+
by B12 Simon on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 09:10 UTC
B12 Simon
Member since:
2006-11-08

Eclipse for Java, Homesite+ for the web stuff. It's still the best HTML editor on Windows.

Reply Score: 2

Old Software
by bazmail on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 10:46 UTC
bazmail
Member since:
2005-07-25

I still Use:

Windows XP
Winamp 2.95
Paint Shop Pro 4.x (from 1997, renamed to paint.exe ;) )
Delphi 7 Pro
Hex Workshop 3.1 (~1997)

Reply Score: 1

My 2 old-school software's
by thavid on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 12:14 UTC
thavid
Member since:
2009-06-23

Passkeeper (Still the same version that I was using back in Win98, that worked in WinME, Win2k, WinXP, and now, Vista. Also runs with no problem at all in WINE)

WS FTP (Well, for me, this is THE ftp client)

Reply Score: 1

My Favorite Oldies
by jlt2007 on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 12:41 UTC
jlt2007
Member since:
2006-06-10

Windows Cardfile
Design CAD PRO
Winamp 2.5
MS Office Suite 1997
Atomtime
MailWasherFree
Norton Utilities Suite 2003
especially Norton Ghost 2003
Kerio
Partition Magic 4,7 & 8
MealMaster
AND a real Golden Oldie Desktop Publishing, Sign, Greeting Card, Banner, Business Card, Letterhead, etc.
Instant Artist

Reply Score: 1

Old Assemblers
by snickelfritz on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 13:20 UTC
snickelfritz
Member since:
2009-06-22

Assemblers for several old 8-bit CPUs including the 6800, 6809, 8080, Z80, 6502.
Turbo C for the occasional boot sector utility or imaging program.
Visual Basic 5 (not very different from v6).
A couple of dozen utilities I wrote many years ago.

Reply Score: 1

Wordstar 7
by iarann on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 13:27 UTC
iarann
Member since:
2006-05-14

I am still using Wordstar 7d for all personal writing. These days though I have to run it in Dosbox, and created two scripts so I can still be compatible with other word processors (though oddly enough WordPerfect still will import from the Wordstar 7 format). The First script will automatically convert anything I save to rtf using the converter that comes with the application. The second script automatically takes the postscript file I print and produces a PDF. Nothing elegant or exciting, but I've been using it for so many years now I don't see the point in switching. Writing is still writing, and other than layout features I don't see anything special about any newer word processors. One thing most people don't know is that writers aren't supposed to do layout, so a lot off those fancy new features in Word are useless if you aren't making fliers or company newsletters.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by filip007
by filip007 on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 13:36 UTC
filip007
Member since:
2009-06-23

What old software...maybe some games?

I had Pentium II 400MHz with 64MB at lest, 32MB was for P1...

Reply Score: 1

XFree-3.3.6
by petrasl on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 13:36 UTC
petrasl
Member since:
2006-01-03

My IBM ThinkPad 755CD [Pentium I 75MHz, 40MB RAM, 2GB HD] runs FreeBSD-4.9 and XFree-3.3.6 quite well.

Reply Score: 1

x2x
by raboof on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 13:57 UTC
raboof
Member since:
2005-07-24

It looks like there has been some activity in recent years, but I always found x2x a very nice example of a tool that does one thing and does it well - and of the flexibility of the X architecture.

ftp://gatekeeper.dec.com/pub/DEC/SRC/x2x/

Reply Score: 1

i have
by Mellin on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 16:23 UTC
Mellin
Member since:
2005-07-06

clarisworks

Reply Score: 2

Red Alert 2
by qroon on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 17:33 UTC
qroon
Member since:
2005-10-21

I'm still enjoying this game. Heck, I even love the version prior to Yuri's Revenge ;)

Reply Score: 2

I'm using my Atari STe and Falcon 030 still
by wawrzyn on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 18:18 UTC
wawrzyn
Member since:
2009-03-24

I'm still using my Atari STe for some fun and playing games... I'm using Atari Falcon 030 for the same purposes also. More rarely, but I'm also connecting my Atari 65XE or Commodore 64 (inherited from my wife, as it was her machine during childhood) to our TV-set to have some fun. Right now, it seems that this Commodore 64 would be the first machine of our son :-) So, it will be used as long, as possible.

Reply Score: 1

FMTAP
by Sam Shazaam on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 20:43 UTC
Sam Shazaam
Member since:
2005-12-28

This is a graphical manipulation program for an OTDR (fiber optic cable tester). It is a DOS program which still uses the .cff file extension. It forces me to use a DOS emulator every time I upgrade.

Reply Score: 1

Old Software
by ralphcarlsonjr on Wed 24th Jun 2009 01:43 UTC
ralphcarlsonjr
Member since:
2007-12-29

Quake 3 (and Team Arena)

fireworks 2, I have mx also but they are a few features they removed in later versions that I love, especially on image exporting

software I wrote for myself, years old but custom made for me ;)

old version of ws-ftp, old version of startup cop,

Reply Score: 1

Good soft does not age
by vtolkov on Wed 24th Jun 2009 04:08 UTC
vtolkov
Member since:
2006-07-26

It is not getting better, like wine, but it does not age as fast. TeX is a good example.

I still use Windows XP, Visual C++ 6.0, Office 2003. This is because I do not like newer versions.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Good soft does not age
by sanders on Sat 27th Jun 2009 20:58 UTC in reply to "Good soft does not age"
sanders Member since:
2005-08-09

I can't believe nobody mentioned TeX sooner...

Reply Score: 1

mk@tuco.de
Member since:
2007-01-23

Home:
W2k
Winamp 2.91
Real Audio Player alternative 1.90
Quicktime alternative XX?
Windows Media Player 6.4 or Media Player Classic 6.4
Irfan View 3.97

I´m using Winamp for 10 years now. I would never install Quicktime on one of my computers. Altough I´ve seen people that use Quicktime like I am using Winamp. The only reason why I do have Quicktime alternative is, that my Olympus Camera makes Quicktime movies.

Office:
Homesite 5.2
Adobe Acrobat 5.0
Nero 6
Dreamweaver 6
Partition Magic 8
Drive Image 5
U-Lead Gif Animator 5.05
Photo Shop 7
Photo Impact 11 (would also work with 7/8)

I´m using Homesite for 10 years now.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by ml2mst
by ml2mst on Wed 24th Jun 2009 12:42 UTC
ml2mst
Member since:
2005-08-27

- WordPerfect 5.1 NL (DOSemu Linux);
- dBASE IV (DOSemu Linux);
- Windows 98SE (native);
- DOOM (all versions Windows 98SE DOS-mode);
- Redneck Rampage series (Win98SE DOS-mode);
- BLOOD;
- Xara Webstyle 2 (Windows 98SE);
- Xara 3D3 (Windows 98SE)
- ModplugTracker (Windows XP SP3 VirtualBox 2 Linux);
- Demomaker (UAE Linux);
- many Amiga games (UAE Linux);
- many MSX games (fMSX-DOS DOSemu Linux);
- EleBBS (RemoteAcces 2.x clone) Linux;
- Ken's Labyrinth (Linux);
- System 7.5 (Basilisk II Linux).

No problems. Tried Xara Webstyle2 and 3D3 under Wine but for some odd reason this doesn't work too well.

Fortunately I still had an old piece of junk (Cyrix MII CPU, 300 Mhz, 64 MiB EDO-RAM) on which I installed a dualboot Debian Lenny and Win98SE. The Xara stuff runs well on that one ;-)

Edited 2009-06-24 12:56 UTC

Reply Score: 1

Old software
by Gurkan on Wed 24th Jun 2009 12:49 UTC
Gurkan
Member since:
2007-01-05
in work I have to use...
by MYOB on Wed 24th Jun 2009 21:35 UTC
MYOB
Member since:
2005-06-29

Theres some relatively recent "old" stuff:
XP/Office 2003, due to none of the customers liking Vista and Office 2007 having very poor Access MDB support
VB6 for working on stuff related to the Access "application" I have to support


Then theres the ancient stuff:
VB3 for working on an even older application thats still in the wild.
Access 2.0 for database work on said application.

Other half of the company have to work with/on a collection of DOS apps dating to 1987 at core and a set of "interesting" Windows GUI frontends to same.

We're screwed when customer start using x64 systems.

Reply Score: 1

What I use
by tonyyeb on Thu 25th Jun 2009 14:38 UTC
tonyyeb
Member since:
2007-12-02

Amiga OS3.

Reply Score: 1

More then I probably should
by neozeed on Fri 26th Jun 2009 13:50 UTC
neozeed
Member since:
2006-03-03

I paid a small fortune for WORD 2.0 back in the day, and yeah I still use it. Screw all the 'progress' Word 2 is what most people use as far as core functionality.

Oh and as I mentioned somewhere else, QuickC for windows. The debugger doesn't work right but it's got great C documentation, and is great for me to bang out small stuff, test blocks of code etc.. And it's on 4 floppies!

I also still run my NeXT cube with nextstep, but I mostly use it to IRC, and testing crap for endianess & whatnot. Oh sure there is faster stuff, but if it runs "ok" on a 25Mhz 68040 it can't be that bad.

And for 'fun' I do run 4.3 BSD on SIMH's VAX 11/780 emulator...

I also LOVE Watcom 10 & 11's stack unwinding, to watch things crash out... Not to mention for building MS-DOS & Win32s exe's that'll run on dammed near everything.

Heck even Windows 7 will still run Win32s bound exe's, just no MS-DOS stuff without something like VirtualPC/DOSBox.

I've just got to figure out why the old Exchange 4 MS-DOS client won't talk to the Exchange 2003 server.. It was faster then any windows client, and ran great in a VM...

Reply Score: 1