Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 9th Aug 2009 18:33 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes We had a remarkably short week this past week, so this will probably be the shortest Week in Review yet. We talked about Apple's hardware design, GNOME's decision to drop icons from menus and buttons, KDE 4.3 was released, and more.
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Finally high activity on KDE thread
by pns.sri on Mon 10th Aug 2009 04:17 UTC
pns.sri
Member since:
2009-06-20

Looks like KDE 4.3 is really good. I see lot of discussion (162) and most of it is positive. Also I see lot of comments where they say they are coming back to KDE after they left during 4.0.
Kudos to KDE team for sticking to the plan and most importantly delivering what they set out to do. Now all I can say is KDE 4.4 will be stunning...

Reply Score: 2

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Looks like KDE 4.3 is really good.

Yeah. KDE4.x+1 is always "good".

I see lot of discussion (162)

There's always a lot of "discussion".

and most of it is positive.

It's always "mostly positive".

Also I see lot of comments where they say they are coming back to KDE after they left during 4.0.

Of those who are still watching, after the droves left, would you mind counting the number who say they are coming back?

Kudos to KDE team for sticking to the plan and most importantly delivering what they set out to do.

Yes. Doggedness is next to Godliness.

Now all I can say is KDE 4.4 will be stunning.

Yes. I'm sure that KDE 4.x+1 will be stunning.

Edited 2009-08-10 04:43 UTC

Reply Score: 0

GiantTalkingCow Member since:
2009-01-27

Trollish as your post may come across, you're mostly right on the money. Plasma's still a huge stability problem, and Dolphin's got all sorts of problems with large files, along with a dodgy UI. Sure, 4.3 looks a lot better than the buggier stuff they put out in years past, but it's not 'ready' if what you want is a stable desktop.

Reply Score: 0

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Dude, I like your style but this hating on KDE is getting a bit tired, almost as tired as the irrational Ubuntu-hate by others.

Reply Score: 6

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Dude, I like your style but this hating on KDE is getting a bit tired, almost as tired as the irrational Ubuntu-hate by others.

I don't hate KDE.

Reply Score: 2

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Could have fooled me.

Reply Score: 3

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Could have fooled me.

Well then you were just wrong, weren't you? ;-)

Seriously, though, I was using and cheering on KDE way back in the pre 1.0 days. (0.9 something)

If you have paid attention to my views on competition in the OSS world (which is not to imply that I particularly think that everyone *should* be looking to me for guidance) it should be clear that I believe in 2 major competitors battling it our in the top tier, with a churning cauldron below, out of which might spring surprising new competitors. IMO, the KDE guys dropped the ball with KDE4. And nothing has sprung from the bubbling cauldron to replace KDE in tier 1. Which leaves us with a very non-optimal situation in the OSS desktop world. This troubles me.

I'm not sure that one can accurately characterize that as "KDE Hate". I am, however, annoyed by fanboyism of any sort. Even, and perhaps especially, in my own camp.

Edited 2009-08-12 13:31 UTC

Reply Score: 2

setec_astronomy Member since:
2007-11-17

If you have paid attention to my views on competition in the OSS world (which is not to imply that I particularly think that everyone *should* be looking to me for guidance) it should be clear that I believe in 2 major competitors battling it our in the top tier, with a churning cauldron below, out of which might spring surprising new competitors.

With the exception that I prefer a system with more than two "major" providers, I'm pretty much in agreement with you here. Of course, given your background and your use cases, anything that needs more than 50 - 100 MByte per shared desktop without providing in return really convincing benefits for your buisness oriented desktop customers is probably no longer eligible for "tier 1" membership, while my requirements for recomending and deploying software is less constrained and - perhaps, errenously - more forgiving to shortcomings and errors. It would probably be interesting to discuss when GNOME 2.x became tier 1 worthy by your definition, but since it is evident that we have somewhat different and entrenched positions regarding that particular transition, this is probably not the right thread for discussing this.

I'm not sure that one can accurately characterize that as "KDE Hate". I am, however, annoyed by fanboyism of any sort. Even, and perhaps especially, in my own camp.


As somebody who is guilty of tolerating the fanboys on my side of the argumentative fence (and probably of being a vocal and anoying fanboy myself) I would like to point out that you seem to have less problems with fanboism in favour of projects you value. This may be one reason why people, including yours truly, perceive your behaviour on KDE4 threads as surprisingly emotional and not on par with the usual quality of your other contributions to discussions. (I will stop the smoozing in a minute, promised).

I know you attribute this to "everybody that cared and didn't drank the kool-aid-written-with-k has already moved on", but most reviews of KDE 4.3 and 4.2 - including from such outspoken critics like SJVN (who is imnsho a windbag, but this is besides the point) seem to be pretty positive. It probably is a wrong impression, but your reaction towards all developments in KDE 4.x seems to be "it sucked, it still sucks and as long as they don't perform the dustiest kowtow in the history of software development, it won't stop sucking".

It would be great to discuss the shortcomings of a project that definitly has a lot of room for improvement like KDE4 with a knowledgeable critic without falling into the repetative patterns we currently have.

Edited 2009-08-12 14:59 UTC

Reply Score: 2

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

With the exception that I prefer a system with more than two "major" providers, I'm pretty much in agreement with you here.

The precise numbers are arbitrary. I think that it should be a number which is manageable by application providers who want to play in our OSS ecosystem. I would not object to a slightly higher number. I place it, conservatively, at 2. The churning cauldron is, however, a critical requirement.

Regarding my requirements for tier 1... well, I do prize efficiency. Even outside of what I need for my work. (My car gets 52 mpg on the highway, at a steady 65mph.) However, if the benefits were significant enough, I would go as high as, perhaps, 768MB per user. Given the huge benefits which shared memory affords upon a Linux XDMCP server (which, sadly, owners of single-user Linux PCs never get to see or appreciate) 768MB per desktop is quite a huge amount.

*But* I would have to perceive that my users would get enough back in functionality to justify that move. And at this time, a move to any other desktop than the one we use would, I believe, result in a net *loss* of functionality.

Edited 2009-08-12 22:39 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Well, you've been a bit "insistingly negative" on all KDE4 topics lately. Suffice to say, I do not agree with your views on KDE4 but lets leave it at that.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by robojerk
by robojerk on Mon 10th Aug 2009 05:48 UTC
robojerk
Member since:
2006-01-10

I consider myself a KDE fan, I don't use it cuz I'm usually stuck in windows world or staring at BASH, that said I do load up a VM every time there's a KDE release to check out what's new. You can hate KDE all you want, but the vision of where it's going can't be ignored. Eventually (4.4, 4.5, 4.6, hopefully soon) the environment will reach maturity.
People will still hate it, due to personal preference or some undying devotion to some other DE.

Reply Score: 1