Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 14th Aug 2009 08:02 UTC
Internet & Networking The browser wars have really been heating up again lately. Thanks to Mozila's Firefox, Internet Explorer is no longer the undisputed king, and browsers are popping up all over the place trying grab a piece of the pie. A new browser project called RockMelt is in development - and it's backed by Mosaic developer and Netscape founder Marc Andreessen.
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penetrating the market
by TheGreatSudoku on Fri 14th Aug 2009 10:46 UTC
TheGreatSudoku
Member since:
2009-07-28

The biggest hurdle for any new browser, as the cnet article stated, is penetrating the existing browser market. Chrome is only at 2%, Firefox at 23%, with no mention of where Opera/Safari/other alternatives stand...

In order for RockMelt to succeed it has to be as simple and intuitive as the "default" browsers IE and Safari WHILE incorporating things like support for the vast amount of plugins/extentions/themes/other addons Firefox offers WHILE being as fast and lightweight as Opera.

I don't think a tight integration with facebook is enough, as a tight integration with Google only has gotten Chrome a 2% user base. Perhaps if there were enhanced facebook features ONLY available in Rockmelt WHILE taking advantage of all I mentioned it MAY stand a chance in the era of Browser War II.

Reply Score: 1

RE: penetrating the market
by Kroc on Fri 14th Aug 2009 10:51 UTC in reply to "penetrating the market"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

It took Firefox 5 years to get where it is now, and a lot of that is entirely grass roots. IE6 was so bad, that when Firefox came along and presented a workable alternative, everybody jumped at the chance to spread the word.

I don’t think Google are done with Chrome yet, not by a long shot.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: penetrating the market
by Karitku on Fri 14th Aug 2009 13:08 UTC in reply to "RE: penetrating the market"
Karitku Member since:
2006-01-12

There is also money part. IE and Safari are both part of OS so money comes from OS sales, Chrome is back by Google that gets money from ads, Firefox is backed by Mozilla Foundation which is donation based plus ads, Opera is backed mostly by mobile browser sales and ads, then there is huge number of other browsers that are mostly forks of those.

Back in Netscape days competition was much less. I really fail to see how they plan to finance this new browser production, ads most likely. But to get good ad revenue you need lot of users, very hard combo for new product.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: penetrating the market
by sbergman27 on Fri 14th Aug 2009 14:36 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: penetrating the market"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Firefox is backed by Mozilla Foundation which is donation based plus ads,

Firefox is backed by Mozilla Corporation which is based on the $70 million per year they get through directing their users to Google for search. Let's please call a spade a spade.

Reply Score: 7

RE[2]: penetrating the market
by WorknMan on Fri 14th Aug 2009 14:40 UTC in reply to "RE: penetrating the market"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

It took Firefox 5 years to get where it is now, and a lot of that is entirely grass roots. IE6 was so bad, that when Firefox came along and presented a workable alternative, everybody jumped at the chance to spread the word.


Yeah, and it also happened while MS sat on their laurels and didn't touch IE for several years either. No such luck now.

Anyway, whatever browser comes out now days needs at the very least some sort of ad-blocking capability. Otherwise, I ain't going near it.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: penetrating the market
by sbergman27 on Fri 14th Aug 2009 14:45 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: penetrating the market"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Yeah, and it also happened while MS sat on their laurels and didn't touch IE for several years either. No such luck now.

Would not 'sat on their asses' be a more appropriate expression? I do not recall there being any laurels involved.

Edited 2009-08-14 14:47 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: penetrating the market
by righard on Fri 14th Aug 2009 17:29 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: penetrating the market"
righard Member since:
2007-12-26

Ostensible it might seem so, but there weren't any male donkeys involved either.

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: penetrating the market
by darknexus on Fri 14th Aug 2009 19:12 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: penetrating the market"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Ostensible it might seem so, but there weren't any male donkeys involved either.


I think you forgot about Steve Balmer.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: penetrating the market
by Kroc on Fri 14th Aug 2009 17:40 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: penetrating the market"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

The correct phrase is to ‘rest on one’s laurels’. That is, once in a position of dominance, to then do nothing to maintain it. Which is exactly what Micrsoft did. Once IE was №1, they disbanded the IE team and did jack all.

Reply Score: 2

What's in a name?
by bonedance on Fri 14th Aug 2009 15:22 UTC
bonedance
Member since:
2009-07-30

They're naming it... RockMelt?

It's so hot it melts rocks?

Reply Score: 1

RE: What's in a name?
by drstorm on Fri 14th Aug 2009 16:24 UTC in reply to "What's in a name?"
drstorm Member since:
2009-04-24

They're naming it... RockMelt?

It's so hot it melts rocks?

Yeah, plus it allows them to use that really cool (or hot?) doomsday icon. I actually like it. ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE: What's in a name?
by Tuishimi on Fri 14th Aug 2009 16:42 UTC in reply to "What's in a name?"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

It is the project name. The final browser name may differ.

[smack]

Note to self: RTFA first.

It's the start up company name. Still, the browser name may differ.

Edited 2009-08-14 16:50 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: What's in a name?
by bonedance on Fri 14th Aug 2009 18:45 UTC in reply to "RE: What's in a name?"
bonedance Member since:
2009-07-30

[Smacks back]

You should follow your own advice. However, don't limit yourself to just the article, and read the post you're responding to as well. They're naming "it" RockMelt. The article is also vague on whether or not this will be the company name, the browser name, or the project name - it could be all three.

Anyways it was just a comment on the funny name. Am I really replying to this? I can't believe I am.

::sigh::

Edited 2009-08-14 18:46 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: What's in a name?
by Tuishimi on Fri 14th Aug 2009 18:46 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: What's in a name?"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

You have nothing better to do either, eh? My code is in QA and I am waiting to hear about all the bugs I've created to keep them busy. ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE: What's in a name?
by wowtip on Sat 15th Aug 2009 02:13 UTC in reply to "What's in a name?"
wowtip Member since:
2005-07-14

Well, I read it as Rock Me It. Even more confusing name.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: What's in a name?
by leavengood on Mon 17th Aug 2009 20:48 UTC in reply to "RE: What's in a name?"
leavengood Member since:
2006-12-13

Well, I read it as Rock Me It. Even more confusing name.


Me too.

I wouldn't bother to make a new browser for the mainstream operating systems, but I'm personally working on a new browser for Haiku, since it is kind of needed. But a lot of people wouldn't bother making a new OS like Haiku so I suppose I'm a hypocrite. So more power to the Rock Me It or rather RockMelt guys...

Reply Score: 1

Wonder what its twist will be
by Tuishimi on Fri 14th Aug 2009 16:49 UTC
Tuishimi
Member since:
2005-07-06

I gave them my email address... I am interested in knowing how this browser will differ.

Not really sure what combination of features offered in current browsers need to be bastardized or combined to form a unique and more useful tool.

Reply Score: 2

Mosaic vs. Netscape
by JoeBuck on Fri 14th Aug 2009 17:37 UTC
JoeBuck
Member since:
2006-01-11

Netscape was a re-implementation from scratch; the code was not based on the Mosaic code (Netscape didn't have the rights to it). Certainly from an idea perspective Netscape was based on the experience with Mosaic.

Reply Score: 2

Why it could be "successful"
by daniel_iversen on Sat 15th Aug 2009 00:00 UTC
daniel_iversen
Member since:
2005-07-16

It does not have to matter at all that it does not get much market share...

In today's large world of online users, a "mega niche" browser can make a decent amount of money too... As long as it renders pages really well but thats where the standards of WebKit etc. comes in and makes life easy..

Cheers,
Daniel

Reply Score: 1

I need another browser ?
by chemical_scum on Sat 15th Aug 2009 00:07 UTC
chemical_scum
Member since:
2005-11-02

On my Ubuntu system I have:

Firefox 3.5 (Shiretoko nightly build)
Chromium
Epiphany (Webkit version)
Opera
Dillo
Galeon
Konqueror
Midori
SeaMonkey
Lynx
w3m
and finally
Internet Explorer 6.0 on IEs4Linux

Submitted using Chromium 4.0.202.0 (23308) but Firefox 3.5 is still my favorite browser.

I need another browser ?

Reply Score: 2

RE: I need another browser ?
by jrlah on Sat 15th Aug 2009 11:23 UTC in reply to "I need another browser ?"
jrlah Member since:
2005-08-09

I don't know if you need it, but you are obviously a browser collector, so I'm sure you'll add RockMelt to the collection just for the sake of it.

Reply Score: 1

Seriously - I don't need another browser
by snd2000 on Sat 15th Aug 2009 05:43 UTC
snd2000
Member since:
2006-07-30

IE needed for corporate apps, Firefox for extensions, Chrome for speed and auto-updates - three's enough for me. I am not excited about this, I don't see what it could offer that I don't already have in one form or another, or that the established browsers won't immediately mimic for their next release. This sounds like Web 2.0 2.0, with people rushing in to fund something that I can't see making anywhere near enough money to justify the investment. Oh well, its their money...

Reply Score: 1

I'm skeptical
by richmassena on Sat 15th Aug 2009 09:37 UTC
richmassena
Member since:
2006-11-26

Reply Score: 1

Ever since the fox turned to a hog
by strcpy on Sat 15th Aug 2009 15:58 UTC
strcpy
Member since:
2009-05-20

... I've been dreaming of a lightweight browser for *nix. Every year I evaluate the open source alternatives, and even try to drop a patch or two, but the road seems endless and rocky. Thus, thumbs up for all alternatives to the "IE of *nix"!

Reply Score: 1