Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 1st Nov 2009 22:57 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes Another week gone bye-bye, another Week in Review. Ubuntu 9.10 was the star of the week of course, but we also talked about language, the HTC Hero, and wall warts. Yes we did.
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Ubuntu...
by helf on Sun 1st Nov 2009 23:29 UTC
helf
Member since:
2005-07-06

I made the mistake of deciding to do a distro upgrade from 9.04 to 9.10. DON'T try that. It might work, or it might fail horribly and leave you with a barely usable installation like it did me ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Ubuntu...
by bousozoku on Sun 1st Nov 2009 23:41 UTC in reply to "Ubuntu..."
bousozoku Member since:
2006-01-23

I made the mistake of deciding to do a distro upgrade from 9.04 to 9.10. DON'T try that. It might work, or it might fail horribly and leave you with a barely usable installation like it did me ;)


I'm beginning to think I'll wait until 9.10.2. Wasn't there such a thing with 9.04? Besides, I'm having enough fun trying to get Snow Leopard to work properly for me.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Ubuntu...
by cmost on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 00:47 UTC in reply to "Ubuntu..."
cmost Member since:
2006-07-16

I made the mistake of deciding to do a distro upgrade from 9.04 to 9.10. DON'T try that. It might work, or it might fail horribly and leave you with a barely usable installation like it did me ;)


Contrary to popular belief, upgrades from one version of Ubuntu to the next rarely if ever work correctly. I think because it could theoretically work for a select few people, the devs like to tout the process as foolproof for everybody. Hardly! Many people utilize PPA repositories or install software from source which could present problems when upgrading. I learned that lesson the hard way quite awhile ago and always do a fresh install.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Ubuntu...
by sbenitezb on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 01:19 UTC in reply to "RE: Ubuntu..."
sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

I think rolling release distros are a better way to keep your system up to date without having to switch to a different repository every six month. Not newbie proof, of course.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Ubuntu...
by lemur2 on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 01:51 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Ubuntu..."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I think rolling release distros are a better way to keep your system up to date without having to switch to a different repository every six month. Not newbie proof, of course.


I keep a separate /home partition. That means I can reformat / and install a new Linux OS (it doesn't even have to be the same distribution as before) and just carry on from there. If the new OS doesn't suit ... I can just revert to the original, or indeed try another distribution.

It typically takes only about 30 miuntes to swap the distribution in the / partition like this. If you don't want even that disruption, why not just stick with what you already have in the first place?

PS: My upgrade to Kubuntu 9.10 has gone flawlessly on each of four different machines to date.

Edited 2009-11-02 01:53 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Ubuntu...
by sbenitezb on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 06:30 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Ubuntu..."
sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

Seems a lot of trouble just to get a newer version. Pretty much Windowesque.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Ubuntu...
by spaceLem on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 14:07 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Ubuntu..."
spaceLem Member since:
2007-07-26

Seems a lot of trouble just to get a newer version. Pretty much Windowesque.


Keeping a separate /home partition is pretty good practice regardless, as it makes it easier to recover things if you accidentally blow up your linux. That, and keeping a regular backup of /etc

Also, installing Ubuntu is easy enough that upgrading and installing the new version from scratch are pretty much on par with each other. I'm going to have to reinstall this time, because my / partition is too full for an upgrade, and I fancy a bit of a spring clean (in winter) anyway.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Ubuntu...
by bousozoku on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 01:30 UTC in reply to "RE: Ubuntu..."
bousozoku Member since:
2006-01-23


Contrary to popular belief, upgrades from one version of Ubuntu to the next rarely if ever work correctly. I think because it could theoretically work for a select few people, the devs like to tout the process as foolproof for everybody. Hardly! Many people utilize PPA repositories or install software from source which could present problems when upgrading. I learned that lesson the hard way quite awhile ago and always do a fresh install.


According to the "How did your upgrade/installation go?" poll in the Ubuntu forums, fresh installations and upgrades aren't that dissimilar.

I've had good luck, I suppose, even with some software added outside Synaptic, from 7.04 to 9.04. They seemed to get worse as time progressed. Of course, the Broadcom wireless drivers always seem to be a problem.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Ubuntu...
by sultanqasim on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 02:49 UTC in reply to "RE: Ubuntu..."
sultanqasim Member since:
2006-10-28

I'd second that. I've never succeeded in upgrading Ubuntu; something always goes wrong, and it's something different each time. I must always do a clean install.

However, I've never had problems upgrading with rolling release distros (i.e. Arch Linux).

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Ubuntu...
by Soulbender on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 07:53 UTC in reply to "RE: Ubuntu..."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Contrary to popular belief, upgrades from one version of Ubuntu to the next rarely if ever work correctly


Really. That must be why I have distro upgraded my laptop since Intrepid and it is still working fine. I'm also using PPA's without any problems when upgrading.

I think because it could theoretically work for a select few people, the devs like to tout the process as foolproof for everybody


I cant recall when and where it has been touted as "foolproof for everybody".

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Ubuntu...
by darknexus on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 16:11 UTC in reply to "RE: Ubuntu..."
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

I don't think any upgrade is fool proof for everyone. No matter what os, no matter what software, there's just no way to take into account every possible configuration change one might have made. I've had Ubuntu upgrades work perfectly, and I've had them royally screw up. I've had the same experiences with Arch, Gentoo, Debian, OpenBSD, OS X, and certainly Windows just to name a few. Os upgrading will never be a completely smooth experience, there's just too much that can't be tested.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Ubuntu...
by Johann Chua on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 09:59 UTC in reply to "Ubuntu..."
Johann Chua Member since:
2005-07-22

Worked fine for me. Used the alternate CD image (downloaded via BitTorrent, then mounted the ISO) instead of directly using the update manager for the upgrade.

Reply Score: 2

Upgrading...
by ncc4100 on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 14:14 UTC
ncc4100
Member since:
2006-05-10

I upgraded from 9.04 to 9.10. The only issue I had was that audio didn't work. I had to uninstall pulse audio and uncheck the digital channel in kmixer and reboot. So far, everything seems to work. However, the sound is set at max and the volume control doesn't seem to work in kmix.

Reply Score: 1

ubuntu 9.10 problem
by paul14213 on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 20:14 UTC
paul14213
Member since:
2008-12-13

I installed ubuntu 9.10 the first everything went ok.

I then had to shut down the pc when i turn the pc back

i get white ubuntu logo then the monitor screen turns

black an wont goto login page.


im on dell gx 260 intel onboard video

I hope this issue gets fixed

I drove myself crazy asking for help on irc chat

In my opinion its a ok release bug it has issues

Reply Score: 1

RE: ubuntu 9.10 problem
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 20:46 UTC in reply to "ubuntu 9.10 problem"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

intel onboard video


There's your problem. Ubuntu failed to properly test their high-profile release on what is probably the most common graphics chipset vendor (no numbers to back it up).

Reply Score: 1

ubuntu 9.10 problem
by paul14213 on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 21:22 UTC
paul14213
Member since:
2008-12-13

This could hurt ubuntu if they get the problem fixed.

Im not good at commandline.

someone said edit boot in kernel

vga = 720

Im totally lost when it come to that

Reply Score: 1

RE: ubuntu 9.10 problem
by lemur2 on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 23:20 UTC in reply to "ubuntu 9.10 problem"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

This could hurt ubuntu if they get the problem fixed. Im not good at commandline. someone said edit boot in kernel vga = 720 Im totally lost when it come to that


There is a file /etc/default/grub . You need to be root to edit it, but it contains the default parameters to be passed to the kernel on boot.

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1195275&highlight=customiz...

etc/default/grub
This file contains information formerly contained in the upper section of Grub Legacy's menu.lst and items contained on the end of the kernel line. The items in this file can be edited by a user with administrator (root) privileges.


The line that you apparently want to edit is this one:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash"

Change it to read as follows:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash vga=720"

To do this, from your initial "black screen", hit Alt-F1 to get to a vga command prompt. Log in. Then type:

sudo nano etc/default/grub

Change the line indicated above as shown. Hit Ctrl-X then Y to save the file.

Then type the following to update grub:

sudo update-grub

Once that is done, reboot (Ctrl-alt-del).

Reply Score: 3