Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 9th Dec 2009 00:00 UTC
Mozilla & Gecko clones Mozilla has released Thunderbird 3. You can read the release notes, or download the darn thing. "If you like Firefox's tabbed browsing, you're going to love tabbed email. Thunderbird 3's tabbed email lets you load emails in separate tabs so you can quickly jump between them. Search results open in a new tab too. New tools like our timeline and filtering tools will help you pinpoint the email you're looking for, whether it’s the one from yesterday, last month, or several years ago."
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nice, but...
by JrezIN on Wed 9th Dec 2009 02:37 UTC
JrezIN
Member since:
2005-06-29

nice!

...but page 2? no body cares about e-mail clients anymore? even cross-platform ones?

Reply Score: 6

RE: nice, but...
by UltraZelda64 on Wed 9th Dec 2009 03:04 UTC in reply to "nice, but..."
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Apparently not.

I admit, I like my Gmail... you can set up an account and access it from anywhere, and its web interface is nice and clean. But when I recently installed the then-current 2x version of Thunderbird and realized I could use it with my web-based Gmail account in the "classic" fashion, I was quite pleasantly surprised. The best of both worlds! Not to mention, it's not ISP-provided, so my e-mail address doesn't change every damn time I switch ISPs.

Now, the only problem is... waiting for the next Ubuntu release or whatever it takes to package it. Sure, Mozilla probably provides a tar file or something to extract into your home directory, which is how I used Firefox 3 and 3.5 up until Ubuntu *finally* decided to support it officially... but it feels "cleaner" and more proper to use the official package management system. It'd rather not use tarred, generically pre-built binaries if I can help it.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: nice, but...
by Rahul on Wed 9th Dec 2009 06:37 UTC in reply to "RE: nice, but..."
Rahul Member since:
2005-07-06

Fedora 11 and Fedora 12 includes the latest pre-release and will update to the general release soon. XULRunner is a shared component by dozens of software packages and hence it isn't really easy to shift to new major versions.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: nice, but...
by kfet on Wed 9th Dec 2009 07:21 UTC in reply to "RE: nice, but..."
kfet Member since:
2005-07-06
RE[2]: nice, but...
by vivainio on Wed 9th Dec 2009 10:14 UTC in reply to "RE: nice, but..."
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

Sure, Mozilla probably provides a tar file or something to extract into your home directory, which is how I used Firefox 3 and 3.5 up until Ubuntu *finally* decided to support it officially... but it feels "cleaner" and more proper to use the official package management system. It'd rather not use tarred, generically pre-built binaries if I can help it.


I'm using the tarball as we speak. What's the problem with it anyway? That's basically how windows users deal with their software all the time, and I don't see them complaining.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: nice, but...
by l3v1 on Wed 9th Dec 2009 12:09 UTC in reply to "RE: nice, but..."
l3v1 Member since:
2005-07-06

Apparently not.


Oh no, there are some of us who do. For myself, I do especially care about the portable app version, which I'm using for many years now. That doesn't mean I don't have backups on gmail, at work and at home, but still, it's nice to have all my mails from all accounts handy all the time, even without a connection (!).

Reply Score: 2

RE: nice, but...
by vivainio on Wed 9th Dec 2009 08:04 UTC in reply to "nice, but..."
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

nice!

...but page 2? no body cares about e-mail clients anymore? even cross-platform ones?


Yeah, this is a major release of the best email client for Linux.

Even the gmail users will need to use a real client at work to access that pesky exchange server. Thunderbird beats the competition hands down.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: nice, but...
by strcpy on Wed 9th Dec 2009 08:17 UTC in reply to "RE: nice, but..."
strcpy Member since:
2009-05-20


Yeah, this is a major release of the best email client for Linux.


No. The motto of the best email client still reads:


"All mail clients suck. This one just sucks less." -me, circa 1995


Edited 2009-12-09 08:17 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: nice, but...
by vivainio on Wed 9th Dec 2009 08:43 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: nice, but..."
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26


No. The motto of the best email client still reads:


"All mail clients suck. This one just sucks less." -me, circa 1995


Did you try thunderbird 3 already? I'd argue mutt is not better than that.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: nice, but...
by sbergman27 on Sun 13th Dec 2009 17:39 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: nice, but..."
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Did you try thunderbird 3 already? I'd argue mutt is not better than that.

The cool thing about mutt is that is makes you really 'leet. It allows you to berate users of modern email clients, who send you html mail with pretty backgrounds, with a certain degree of authority. It's the geek equivalent of being part of the old Aristocracy.

You should try it. A month or two of putzing with your .muttrc file and seeking out tips from other Mutt users should get you passably close to what TB and Evolution users get "out of the box". ;-)

Edited 2009-12-13 17:40 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: nice, but...
by vivainio on Sun 13th Dec 2009 19:35 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: nice, but..."
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

The cool thing about mutt is that is makes you really 'leet.


'leet is not what it used to be. Back when I was at school, the 'leet thing was to use Gnus (emacs usenet module) for email too. Elm, Mutt and (god forbid) Pine were the newbie choices.

I can sort of understand someone wanting to use Gnus (prolonged marriage to emacs infrastructure), but using mutt on this day and age seems somewhat masochistic (unless you have a crappy computer of course, or read your emails through shell account).

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: nice, but...
by sbenitezb on Wed 9th Dec 2009 13:21 UTC in reply to "RE: nice, but..."
sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

Yeah, this is a major release of the best email client for Linux.


Totally subjective. How can it compete with KMail, for example?

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: nice, but...
by vivainio on Wed 9th Dec 2009 13:29 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: nice, but..."
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

Totally subjective. How can it compete with KMail, for example?


Subjectively speaking, kmail was much slower and more crash-prone for me than thunderbird 2. Obviously I have no benchmarks to prove it.

As for thunderbird 3, it's no comparison at all (though I haven't tried the latest kmail builds...).

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: nice, but...
by phoenix on Thu 10th Dec 2009 17:28 UTC in reply to "RE: nice, but..."
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Yeah, this is a major release of the best email client for Linux.


To each their own. I personally can't stand Thunderbird, after having used KMail/Kontact for so long. Especially now that KMail/Kontact is available for Windows. Why anyone would use something (TB) so slow and blah is beyond me. ;)

Reply Score: 2

Impressive
by McGray on Wed 9th Dec 2009 02:54 UTC
McGray
Member since:
2005-07-12

An impressive release. I was using it since the betas, and it seems to improve in almost every aspect. Specially regarding the mail search, IMAP handling, overall speed and UI.

One feature I like the most is the 'show in conversation', which opens the entire thread in a separate tab. If only it would be easier to reach.. hopefully an extension arrives soon to simplify it.

Reply Score: 2

Sweet
by darknexus on Wed 9th Dec 2009 05:46 UTC
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

Tb3 is my preferred email client when I'm not on my Mac. I've been using it since the betas and have been very impressed. Nice to see it officially released so the distros can start packaging it.

Reply Score: 2

hows the speed?
by ghostwunder on Wed 9th Dec 2009 06:19 UTC
ghostwunder
Member since:
2009-11-25

i've found thunderbird to be slow and heavy in the past. has it lost any weight at all?

Reply Score: 2

RE: hows the speed?
by vivainio on Wed 9th Dec 2009 17:07 UTC in reply to "hows the speed?"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

i've found thunderbird to be slow and heavy in the past. has it lost any weight at all?


I also used to remember thunderbird as slow, but it was fast since thunderbird 2; possibly due to improvements in xul / firefox stack?

Reply Score: 2

RE: hows the speed?
by StephenBeDoper on Wed 9th Dec 2009 20:02 UTC in reply to "hows the speed?"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

i've found thunderbird to be slow and heavy in the past. has it lost any weight at all?


I've been using the "Shredder" nightly builds for a while now, sadly I've been finding it getting more and more sluggish since they introduced automatic indexing of messages (though having nearly 40k messages in my inbox might have something to do with that).

I haven't tried the 3.0 release yet, though.

Reply Score: 2

Improvements.
by bugjacobs on Wed 9th Dec 2009 06:28 UTC
bugjacobs
Member since:
2009-01-03

I love it ! Particularily the new better search function.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by SJ87
by sj87 on Wed 9th Dec 2009 07:29 UTC
sj87
Member since:
2007-12-16

I really need to considering switching back to Thunderbird after a ~18-month period with KMail. Thunderbird's spam filtering is the best I've ever used. KMail always misses the spam and mis-identifies proper messages as spam, and it doesn't handle the junk mail properly anyways.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by SJ87
by sbenitezb on Wed 9th Dec 2009 13:23 UTC in reply to "Comment by SJ87"
sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

I'm using bogofilter with KMail without any troubles, though Gmail takes care of most spam for me.

Reply Score: 3

Comment by talaf
by talaf on Wed 9th Dec 2009 09:34 UTC
talaf
Member since:
2008-11-19

Superb release.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by motang
by motang on Wed 9th Dec 2009 13:28 UTC
motang
Member since:
2008-03-27

I have been using Thunderbird 3 since alpha 3 and it's great. Very much improved over Thunderbird 2. Too bad it too so long to come out, I think it was a year behind. Also isn't this the first release since Mozilla made Mozilla Messaging?

Reply Score: 1

Comment by Calipso
by Calipso on Wed 9th Dec 2009 16:33 UTC
Calipso
Member since:
2007-03-13

looks great. now to just figure out how to import my filters from tb2

Reply Score: 1

Beautiful
by maaxx on Wed 9th Dec 2009 17:11 UTC
maaxx
Member since:
2007-11-06

Beautiful release! Kudos to Mozilla folk once again!

Been using v3 since Beta1 and it's a lot faster in handling my huge inboxes, more solid and more feature rich than v2.

Don't know if it can be compared to mutt, but it's probably the best graphical client one can get ATM.

Reply Score: 1

great...
by Dryhte on Wed 9th Dec 2009 17:25 UTC
Dryhte
Member since:
2008-02-05

I've only installed it today (didn't feel like trusting 10 years of mail to beta software), and I'm really happy with 2 features:
- the lovely search functionality (oh how I missed this in Thunderbird 2 - especially the timeline)
- the 'show in conversation' option

Next, I'm going to investigate how the 'archive' function works.

Great release!

Reply Score: 1

grr...
by StephenBeDoper on Wed 9th Dec 2009 20:36 UTC
StephenBeDoper
Member since:
2005-07-06

While there are certainly some nice improvements over the 2.x versions, there are still some fairly basic bugs and issues that have been around since the 2.x days. I just installed the 3.0 release and ran through my list of TB annoyances, most are still present.

- highlight (say) 20 messages in the drafts folder & hit enter, only 8 will open no matter how many you select.
- to attach a file, you have do drag-drop it on the head section of a compose window. Drag a file onto the body of a message, and (instead of attaching it) TB inserts a *link* to the file - an absolute link that will only work on the sender's computer. Why would anyone want to do that?
- the "View > All Headers" option is useless in many cases, since you can't just select & copy all of the headers. It took me a while to realize that the view source option is the only way to view the raw message.
- I love the ability to partially download a message (very handy for dialup), but downloading the rest of the message is still hit-or-miss (highlight a different message and TB will stop downloading the rest of the previous message)
- so far as I can tell, the option to auto-save drafts doesn't actually kick in until you type something in the reply/forward/compose window
- and my biggest gripe: when you restart TB after a crash, it doesn't restore anything you had open before (unlike Firefox), which is REALLY aggravating if you had a large number of reply/compose windows open before the crash (and even if had them all saved as drafts, there's the annoyance of having to re-open them 8 at a time).

That said, two of my longstanding gripes were fixed - TB finally has a built-in signature editor, and it now parses URLs as links in plain-text EMails ('bout time).

Reply Score: 3

RE: grr...
by Luminair on Thu 10th Dec 2009 09:45 UTC in reply to "grr..."
Luminair Member since:
2007-03-30

this is true

Reply Score: 2

RE: grr...
by arpan on Thu 10th Dec 2009 09:57 UTC in reply to "grr..."
arpan Member since:
2006-07-30

highlight (say) 20 messages in the drafts folder & hit enter, only 8 will open no matter how many you select.


That is probably a feature. Just imagine you selected a 100 messages and accidentally hit enter!

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: grr...
by StephenBeDoper on Thu 10th Dec 2009 18:02 UTC in reply to "RE: grr..."
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

" highlight (say) 20 messages in the drafts folder & hit enter, only 8 will open no matter how many you select.


That is probably a feature. Just imagine you selected a 100 messages and accidentally hit enter!
"

Given the amount of EMail I have, it's not outside the realm of possibility that I would do something like that intentionally. I suspect TB would become unresponsive for a minute or two while it opened all of the messages - but I'd prefer that to opening 100 messages eight at a time.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: grr...
by sorpigal on Fri 11th Dec 2009 21:25 UTC in reply to "RE: grr..."
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

I would expect a friendly "Are you sure?" dialog if I exceed the reasonableness threshhold.

"You seem to be doing something crazy, like opening 100 messages at once. We think this is nuts and are giving you a chance to cancel this action. If you choose to continue we really will try and open 100 windows, but we have no idea if your computer can take that.

Continue?

[I understand, do it anyway] [No! Cancel!]"

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Luminair
by Luminair on Thu 10th Dec 2009 13:05 UTC
Luminair
Member since:
2007-03-30

I've used thunderbird for years and years, and thunderbird 3 is not higher quality than thunderbird 2, and in some ways it is lower quality. And I don't see a significant new feature other than the better search.

Unfortunately, judging from the pace they're moving, they have some more years and years to go before they significantly improve it

Reply Score: 2

it's a great release
by Jason Bourne on Sat 12th Dec 2009 15:10 UTC
Jason Bourne
Member since:
2007-06-02

I was using Thunderbird 2 with some disconfort, in the long past I used Outlook Express and for one thing the UI was better. After migrating to Linux, Evolution was a huge beast with so many options and UI problems. Finally Thunderbird 3 is easy on my eye... the UI has been greatly improved and the new features shine. Thanks Mozilla for learning your lesson - we need more applications like this. And let Songbird and new-Firefox come!

Reply Score: 1

Thunderbird 3 indexing takes forever
by goanna300 on Sat 12th Dec 2009 23:56 UTC
goanna300
Member since:
2009-12-12

I use Thunderbird on several computers.
[The profile's files reside on a microSD card inside my 3G USB stick which is also the way all my computers and their XP/Ubuntu OS's connect to the internet. This is handy].
The problem is:
1) I'm wondering where Thunderbird 3 is going to store its index. My notebook has been indexing for over 4 hours..and not I see it's on its way around again, indexing the same unused mailboxes. The hard drive LED is off, so I'm hoping the indexing is being written to the USB micro SD.
2)Maybe TBird3 is not for people like me. Is it portable?
Steve

Reply Score: 1