Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 9th Dec 2009 19:08 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Samsung has finally lifted the veil a bit on its new mobile platform, Bada. While some of us were expecting a whole new mobile operating system (perhaps built on Linux), reality is a little different: Bada is actually a platform (APIs, programming tools, etc.) which can run on top of different mobile operating systems.
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Interesting.
by NathanHill on Wed 9th Dec 2009 19:12 UTC
NathanHill
Member since:
2006-10-06

And by the way, Bada in Korean actually means ocean... which is why they are talking about an "ocean of endless enjoyment".

Reply Score: 2

RE: Interesting.
by sbergman27 on Wed 9th Dec 2009 19:37 UTC in reply to "Interesting."
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

I just hope they don't team up with Microsoft for search. I don't think I could handle Bada Bing.

Reply Score: 19

RE: Interesting.
by StephenBeDoper on Wed 9th Dec 2009 20:45 UTC in reply to "Interesting."
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

And by the way, Bada in Korean actually means ocean... which is why they are talking about an "ocean of endless enjoyment".


Maybe they hired the same person who came up with with Asus' non-sensical "Heart touching" motto (I chuckle every time I read that).

Or maybe they contracted The Firesign Theatre.

"We must come together as one, like a twin! To make life whole, it's as easy as a bridge over an ocean of endless enjoyment!"

Reply Score: 2

RE: Interesting.
by Mellin on Thu 10th Dec 2009 09:52 UTC in reply to "Interesting."
Mellin Member since:
2005-07-06

Bada is Swedish for bathe

Reply Score: 2

v Doomed to failure <EOM>
by pooo on Wed 9th Dec 2009 19:59 UTC
bousozoku
Member since:
2006-01-23

Samsung remind me a lot of U.S. car designers in the late 1950s: change the look regularly and make it glitzy to get the public's attention so they won't notice what's making it work.

I've never seen another company that made such nice-looking phones that were let down by the software that made them work.

Bada seems to be just another attempt to go cheap and pile on glitz, instead of doing real work the way that Google has.

Reply Score: 2

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Samsung remind me a lot of U.S. car designers in the late 1950s: change the look regularly and make it glitzy to get the public's attention so they won't notice what's making it work.

"Planned Obsolescence" was Cadillac's internal code name for the plan. Seriously. But I think they ran out of ideas after Tail Fins, Dice-a-Slice radiator grilles (my name for what the '59 Eldorado had), and Double-Bullet tail lights.

http://www.1959cadillac.com/images/grill.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a1/Eldorado_59.jpg

http://www.arabaruyasi.com/data/media/8/1959-Cadillac-Eldorado-1024...

Edited 2009-12-09 23:17 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

I'd totally drive an El Dorado. As wrong as it is, it's about as outrageous and f**k-you as they come. Love it.

Reply Score: 1

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

I grew up with this model:

http://www.vehicleappraisalsbyalan.com/1968 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham.jpg

I still have it. Dad and I repainted and put on a new top a few years ago. But as much as I love it, I don't drive it much anymore. I drive my beloved 1988 Chevy Sprint:

http://www.seanano.org/vehicles/pastvehicles/turbosprint/images/062...

Neither photo is of the actual car. (But yes, all the colors are right.) Both are pretty close, but not quite as nice as the Google image search photos.

The Sprint is a joy. 22 years old. 340,000 miles. (260,000 driven by me.) 52 mpg real world average. And the original white paint still shines.

Edited 2009-12-09 23:57 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

Suzuki makes pretty solid vehicles.

Reply Score: 2

bousozoku Member since:
2006-01-23

"Planned Obsolescence" was Cadillac's internal code name for the plan. Seriously. But I think they ran out of ideas after Tail Fins, Dice-a-Slice radiator grilles (my name for what the '59 Eldorado had), and Double-Bullet tail lights.

http://www.1959cadillac.com/images/grill.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a1/Eldorado_59.jpg

http://www.arabaruyasi.com/data/media/8/1959-Cadillac-Eldorado-1024...


My parents had a 1959 Cadillac and I washed the thing as far up as I could. My mum actually took her driver's test in it and had to parallel park on a traffic circle in San Jose, CA.

Those were the days when you could pass off a piece of substandard work and someone other than the government would buy it and they couldn't do anything about it.

I'd think that most people who get a Samsung phone feel that they've been cheated by the unfinished software. Really, though, do consumers notice detail work? I suspect that they wouldn't buy 90 % of the products on the market, if they noticed, or eat at McDonald's.

I'll say one good thing about Samsung: they make great components. Their bits and pieces in others' finished work are great but they should leave products (and especially software) alone.

Reply Score: 2

neticspace Member since:
2009-06-09

Samsung remind me a lot of U.S. car designers in the late 1950s: change the look regularly and make it glitzy to get the public's attention so they won't notice what's making it work.

I've never seen another company that made such nice-looking phones that were let down by the software that made them work.

Bada seems to be just another attempt to go cheap and pile on glitz, instead of doing real work the way that Google has.


This is not just Samsung. Hardware-oriented development model is the main design philosophy in the South Korean electronic scene.

Software development overall is quite weak over there.

Reply Score: 1

Too little too late
by unoengborg on Wed 9th Dec 2009 23:29 UTC
unoengborg
Member since:
2005-07-06

Why waste time learning this when you get a much bigger market if you develop for iPhone, Android or even Windows Phone.

I really don't see where Samsung will be going with this. People who buy a smartphone want to be able to buy/download applications. It will take a very long time before Samsung manages to get a Bada store that matches the Apple iPhone application store, or even that of Android Market.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Too little too late
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 9th Dec 2009 23:32 UTC in reply to "Too little too late"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

You're forgetting that Samsung sells WAY more phones than even Apple and Android combined. If they can get their entire portfolio to run Bada, the developers will come on their own, attracted by a HUGE market potential. I mean, look at those five partners they already have with a product that doesn't even exist yet.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Too little too late
by sbergman27 on Thu 10th Dec 2009 19:07 UTC in reply to "RE: Too little too late"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

You're forgetting that Samsung sells WAY more phones than even Apple...

In a world of 6.5 billion people, "a sucker born every minute" becomes somewhat limiting to companies like Apple, Inc.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Too little too late
by ariarinen on Thu 10th Dec 2009 18:40 UTC in reply to "Too little too late"
ariarinen Member since:
2009-02-07

Well why waste time on Iphone and Android, when Symbian is much larger market.

Currently Samsung has a small appstore with around 600 items (just open in 3 markets), and they sell smartphones with many different OS most with Symbian or Windows but also Android and their own OS. So they already have access to symbian and android developers and the few who develops for windows.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Too little too late
by darknexus on Thu 10th Dec 2009 19:12 UTC in reply to "RE: Too little too late"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Well why waste time on Iphone and Android, when Symbian is much larger market.


Mostly because the iPhone is the one platform where developers, if they charge for their app, are almost guaranteed to get a sale rather than having someone pirate it. Plus, you'd be surprised how many people at least in the US don't realize they can install 3rd party software on their Symbian-based smartphones. It's sad, but there it is.

Reply Score: 2

....and let me guess.
by Phloptical on Thu 10th Dec 2009 02:17 UTC
Phloptical
Member since:
2006-10-10

It's designed to work with Bing.....right?

How did we not see that coming.

Reply Score: 2

Bada for current touchscreen phones?
by stipex on Thu 10th Dec 2009 08:46 UTC
stipex
Member since:
2009-07-30

I wonder if Bada will be also installable on current samsung touchscreen phones such as Samsung f480, gt-s5600...
It would be a nice update for these "older" phones.

Reply Score: 1

Huh, unpexpected
by vaette on Thu 10th Dec 2009 09:50 UTC
vaette
Member since:
2008-08-09

I'm pretty surprised to be saying this, but looking through the ideas and the developer site this looks pretty compelling. Interesting times are coming.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Huh, unpexpected
by adinas on Thu 10th Dec 2009 12:06 UTC in reply to "Huh, unpexpected"
adinas Member since:
2005-08-17

But it seems like you need to develop in C. Ugh

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Huh, unpexpected
by vaette on Thu 10th Dec 2009 13:00 UTC in reply to "RE: Huh, unpexpected"
vaette Member since:
2008-08-09

Well, C++, with a GNU toolchain. That's not a bad baseline to have though, since it ensures quite a bit of portability from other systems. Part of the problem with Android is that it affords very little in the way of portability, it is fiddly to bring native code over, and Java is only partially portable to dalvik.

Notably, since they use the GNU toolchain you can most likely also use Objective-C++ if you want, giving Bada a very nice path of portability from the iPhone. Porting from Symbian and Windows Mobile shouldn't be too much trouble either. All API use will have to be hand-ported, but a core of most apps can most likely be brought over, and common compatibility layers are likely to start springing up.

Being reasonably compatible with the platforms which currently have a good app ecosystem is a good idea, I would go so far as to say that the lack of this is the key problem for webOS and BlackBerry, and one of the things holding Android apps back despite the extreme hype the platform has going on.

Reply Score: 3

fix it first.
by sgtarky on Thu 10th Dec 2009 16:20 UTC
sgtarky
Member since:
2006-01-02

I just wish samsung would work on making pc studio work in windows 7 64bit or even the wm 6.5 updater to run in windows 7 64bit. they need to make existing stuff work

Reply Score: 1

RE: fix it first.
by sbergman27 on Thu 10th Dec 2009 16:24 UTC in reply to "fix it first."
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

I just wish samsung would work on making pc studio work in windows 7 64bit or even the wm 6.5 updater to run in windows 7 64bit. they need to make existing stuff work

Because the Windows platform has always been so very neglected by commercial interests.

Reply Score: 2