Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 18th Dec 2009 17:27 UTC
Red Hat "If you run Itanium-based servers in your data center, 2010 has a surprise for you. The dominant supplier of commercial Linux, Red Hat, is not going to be supporting its future Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 on any Itanium platforms, old or new."
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The Itanic sunk some time ago
by JoeBuck on Fri 18th Dec 2009 17:47 UTC
JoeBuck
Member since:
2006-01-11

... so this is no surprise.

Reply Score: 11

Still, there's SuSE
by christian on Fri 18th Dec 2009 18:23 UTC
christian
Member since:
2005-07-06

and I'm sure SGI will support their existing RH customers.

Else, you're probably already running HP-UX instead, so who cares?

Reply Score: 3

RE: Still, there's SuSE
by tylerdurden on Fri 18th Dec 2009 19:53 UTC in reply to "Still, there's SuSE"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

... or OpenVMS.

I don't think even Windows supports IA-64 any more, right?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Still, there's SuSE
by poundsmack on Fri 18th Dec 2009 20:22 UTC in reply to "RE: Still, there's SuSE"
poundsmack Member since:
2005-07-13

windows still suports Itanium. this makes me sad as my Itanium set up was a tripple boot system with Windows server 2008 R2, OpenVMS, and Red Hat linux. Red hat was by far the most somplete of the Itanium distros, so its sad to see it go ;) . though if itanium plans on staying relivent Intel needs to get out some new chips and fast

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Still, there's SuSE
by cjcox on Fri 18th Dec 2009 21:33 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Still, there's SuSE"
cjcox Member since:
2006-12-21

You say Red Hat was the most complete... are you sure? What is in Red Hat that isn't present in SLES? Just curious.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Still, there's SuSE
by poundsmack on Sat 19th Dec 2009 00:04 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Still, there's SuSE"
poundsmack Member since:
2005-07-13

quality of support we received as well as application stability on the system (out of box).

Reply Score: 2

Still there is Debian.
by gfolkert on Mon 21st Dec 2009 01:17 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Still, there's SuSE"
gfolkert Member since:
2008-12-15

Its been supporting Itanium for a long time and will continue to.

Hell its still support 68000 series processors.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Still there is Debian.
by vivainio on Tue 22nd Dec 2009 12:57 UTC in reply to "Still there is Debian."
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

Its been supporting Itanium for a long time and will continue to.

Hell its still support 68000 series processors.


I don't think your definition of "support" is the same as Red Hat's.

Reply Score: 2

dead
by cocoliso on Fri 18th Dec 2009 20:52 UTC
cocoliso
Member since:
2005-11-26

itanium is dead anyway...

Reply Score: 2

Not as bad as it sounds from the headlines
by porcel on Fri 18th Dec 2009 21:18 UTC
porcel
Member since:
2006-01-28

In fact, you are just fine all the way to 2014 or 2017 depending on where you got your hardware.


Red Hat is committed to protecting Itanium customers' investments and to providing these customers with enterprise class support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 through March 2014. During this period, Red Hat will provide support, deliver new features, and enable new Itanium hardware in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 exclusively in accordance with the published RHEL product lifecycle (http://www.redhat.com/security/updates/errata/).

In addition, extended support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 for Itanium is available up to March 2017 from selected OEMs.

The next major release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (v6) will not provide support for the Itanium architecture; consequently, all Itanium related development will be incorporated into Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 exclusively.

Reply Score: 8

rklrkl
Member since:
2005-07-06

It's interesting to note that the CentOS team (who rebuild RHEL without the Red Hat name/logos) dropped the Itanium platform (in fact, all platforms other than Intel 32/64-bit) when they released CentOS 5. Could this have contributed to the decision by Red Hat to drop Itanium for RHEL 6?

I suspect the CentOS team did it simply for reasons of manpower/hardware availability - they have limited resources and have to concentrate on the most popular platforms. Without CentOS 5 on Itanium, there was no way to easily test RHEL 5 on Itanium without paying (at least for the final release) and that could have resulted in a drop in RHEL 5 Itanium subscriptions.

To be honest, the Itanium 2 platform is too expensive and too slow for general purpose server use - it has a niche in the area of floating point operations, but even Red Hat agree that niche isn't profitable enough to continue developing for.

Red Hat dropping Itanium is a major blow for the platform - you suspect RHEL 5 was as big a seller as Windows Server 2008 on the Itanium platform (does anyone know the Itanium sales figures of those two?). It looks like Itanium Enterprise Linux was handed lock, stock and barrel to Novell with its SuSE Enterprise distro...time will tell how long that one lasts too (no word from Novell on Itanium SuSE 12 yet). I think this marks the beginning of the end of Itanium as a Linux platform, IMHO.

Reply Score: 3

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Could this have contributed to the decision by Red Hat to drop Itanium for RHEL 6?
...
Without CentOS 5 on Itanium, there was no way to easily test RHEL 5 on Itanium without paying (at least for the final release) and that could have resulted in a drop in RHEL 5 Itanium subscriptions.

I seriously doubt it. It's hard to imagine an organization deciding upon Itanium servers and then making their deployment OS choice based upon what they can try for free. After all, RHEL for Itanium is only $349.

Reply Score: 3