Linked by IndigoJo on Wed 10th Feb 2010 00:05 UTC
Apple While some potential users of the iPad may be put off by such things as its lack of multi-tasking, which they might have expected on a device this size, the device may prove highly useful to users with varying disabilities. Ms Ricky Buchanan runs the ATMac website, which is dedicated to accessibility issues with Apple products.
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Great idea, but
by kragil on Wed 10th Feb 2010 00:36 UTC
kragil
Member since:
2006-01-04

I guess people will only be able to enjoy the upscaled Iphone apps as long as there are no Ipad versions ..

My guess is that once an app has a Ipad version Apple will make sure the Ipad will get that version with no option to opt out. That is just how the tick.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Great idea, but
by JonathanBThompson on Wed 10th Feb 2010 01:48 UTC in reply to "Great idea, but"
JonathanBThompson Member since:
2006-05-26

Unless it's Apple's apps, that's not likely an Apple decision at all: the same code that runs on an iPhone/iPod Touch runs as-is on an iPad, or, depending on what the developer wants to do, they can choose to detect and run with the differences running on the iPad provides for sizes. The iPad's size opens up more options for developers because the larger size opens up more options for users due to users actually being able to see/manipulate more and larger objects: how a developer uses that won't change things much, assuming they don't add functionality for an iPad version which can't be done on the smaller devices.

Now is the time to make clear to app developers and (if required) Apple: don't exclude running iPod Touch/iPhone versions of apps on an iPad even if there's an iPad-enhanced version available! Of course, it may cost more to develop and support apps that run within the confines of the smaller device and also have added functionality on the iPad, too... all comes down to business decisions, doesn't it?

Reply Score: 2

Comment by chikahiro
by chikahiro on Wed 10th Feb 2010 01:45 UTC
chikahiro
Member since:
2009-10-15

Very cool. Hadn't thought about any of these things, to be quite honest, but the more people who can use it the better.

Reply Score: 1

That's not even the exciting part
by leos on Wed 10th Feb 2010 03:09 UTC
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

Many non-verbal persons with disabilities use an AAC (Augmentative and Alternative Communication) device such as the Dynavox line (http://www.dynavoxtech.com/products/v/) that go for around $8000 to $10,000. Basically these products let you "speak" by composing phrases from either fragments or symbols.

There have already been some software packages developed for the iPhone to offer similar functionality (http://www.proloquo2go.com/) but the big downside was that the iPhone isn't large enough for daily use. But the iPad is almost the perfect size, and is a heck of a lot less limited than these devices.

I work with people with disabilities every day, and we're definitely going to be experimenting with the iPad as soon as we can get our hands on it.

Reply Score: 7

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Dude, you are really showing your ignorance here. Best not to talk about what you don't understand. The iPad has the same accessibility features as the iPhone. Yes, the touch screen iPhone. Pick one of those up and see how wrong you are on this subject, if you're willing to actually look past your own views that is.
The iPad is the *only* accessible tablet device right now. Android's accessibility is getting there but it's still in its infancy and Google felt no need to perfect it before releasing it. That's not a bad thing, as it means more people can jump on and test it and maybe shape where it goes, but it does mean that it's not up to snuff for certain things yet.
Seriously, go pick up an iPhone or an iPod Touch if you actually want to be informed on this topic. Until then, don't add to the FUD factory.

Reply Score: 5

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

It's not about Android vs the iPhone! It's about the iPad vs standard hardware where you can install standard software. There are several tablets that run linux with GNOME and even Windows. The iPad compares poorly to GNOME or Windows when it comes to accessibility. For web browsing, you are stuck with safari. Firefox is accessible with at-spi. It depends on your handicap, of course, but the iPad does not have the infrastructure to develop accessible software easily and requires hacks.

Reply Score: 2

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

but the iPad does not have the infrastructure to develop accessible software easily and requires hacks.


You seriously have no idea what you are talking about. You really don't, and you obviously do not want to.
Yes, you may be stuck with Safari on the iPad. Guess what? Everybody's stuck with Safari on the iPad. And you know what? It actually works pretty damn good.
Everything written in standard Cocoa is accessible. Simple as that. For things that aren't, it's usually as simple as the developers adding role and tag information to their controls, very much like the way at-spi operates. It's the same as with OS X, the tools for accessibility are right there.
Now, if you have motor impairments I could see how the iPad wouldn't work for you, but if that's the case, why the heck use a capacitive touch screen-based device in the first place?
I know you're anti-Apple, but when discussing things like this you really should attempt to at least be informed. You don't like the way Apple did it, that's one thing. You being deliberately ignorant and spreading completely wrong information, that's another ball game and I for one won't stand for it. There's too much misinformation and disinformation about accessibility and related topics as it is.

Reply Score: 5

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

Is there any at-spi bridge for cocoa? I think not. Are there tools to replace gok, dasher and opengazer for cocoa? I don't think so.

Reply Score: 2

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Is there any at-spi bridge for cocoa?


For heaven's sake, have you been reading anything I've been trying to tell you? You don't need at-spi for Cocoa. Cocoa has an at-spi of its own, on both the iPad and OS X. More specifically, Cocoa interacts with the native accessibility framework of these platforms which has similar principals to at-spi in how it works. I don't see you bitching that there's no at-spi on Windows, and MSAA is a joke by comparison to at-spi or the Apple accessibility frameworks.

Are there tools to replace gok


Not for the iPad as the whole damn keyboard is on-screen. Duh. For os x:
http://assistiveware.com/keystrokes.php
Not free though, I'll give you that. It's the only part you got right in this entire blind anti-Apple hate rant of yours.

dasher


Dasher has an OS X version already. It's in Macports too so easy enough to get. Something you could have found out if you'd wanted to. None for the iPad yet that I know of, but there are several for the iPhone already and those should work. Read the dasher web page for more info, I assume you can find it at least?

and opengazer


Opengazer works on OS X already. Again, something you could have found out with a little reading of the opengazer web page yourself. It took me less than five seconds to find that out. Irrelevant on the iPad of course since the thing has no camera.

Any more ignorance I have to deal with? You're really looking ridiculous. I don't much like Apple either, but that's no excuse to be an idiot and ignore what they've done and what their devices and platforms can provide. Relax the hate, it's clouding your brain.

Reply Score: 3

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23


For heaven's sake, have you been reading anything I've been trying to tell you? You don't need at-spi for Cocoa. Cocoa has an at-spi of its own, on both the iPad and OS X. More specifically, Cocoa interacts with the native accessibility framework of these platforms which has similar principals to at-spi in how it works. I don't see you bitching that there's no at-spi on Windows, and MSAA is a joke by comparison to at-spi or the Apple accessibility frameworks.
Yes, it's like atk and MSAA. It's a widget toolkit with some kind of accessibility that is not portable and not supported by big applications like openoffice, gtk, QT, java or firefox. It's not bad as it is, but it needs an at-spi bridge to be useful, or developer support who are ready to support it in addition to at-spi. at-spi is more advanced and it has many bridges to other widget toolkits and supported by many accessibility applications. What I was trying to say is that on the iPad, cocoa accessibility is pretty useless and very hard to make use of. Doing multi-tasking on the iPad or iPhone requires hack, so dealing with accessibility software is a pain when compared to regular tablets with at-spi supported OS.

Not for the iPad as the whole damn keyboard is on-screen. Duh. For os x:
http://assistiveware.com/keystrokes.php
Not free though, I'll give you that. It's the only part you got right in this entire blind anti-Apple hate rant of yours.

This is not like gok! Gok is much more than an onscreen keyboard! Gok can be used with simple switches and can access any widget on the desktop, can move windows, resize them, everything ... with one switch! Coupled with opengazer, you can run your desktop with just your eyes. There is nothing like that that I'm aware of on the OS X, let alone the iPad.

Dasher has an OS X version already. It's in Macports too so easy enough to get. Something you could have found out if you'd wanted to. None for the iPad yet that I know of, but there are several for the iPhone already and those should work. Read the dasher web page for more info, I assume you can find it at least?

But can you use it to input text in cocoa applications? As far as I know, it runs on Mac OS X, but only to write text in dasher. You can't use it in cocoa.

Opengazer works on OS X already. Again, something you could have found out with a little reading of the opengazer web page yourself. It took me less than five seconds to find that out. Irrelevant on the iPad of course since the thing has no camera.

AFAIK, the iPad does not have any USB port, but you can buy a very expensive plug to use a USB camera. Not as good as a proper USB port, but I believe it should work. Anyway, Opengazer is pretty useless without applications. Opengazer + dasher is really nice to input text at decent speed.

Any more ignorance I have to deal with? You're really looking ridiculous. I don't much like Apple either, but that's no excuse to be an idiot and ignore what they've done and what their devices and platforms can provide. Relax the hate, it's clouding your brain.

You are right about that. I may be too quick to bash Apple. All the articles about the iThings are getting on my nerves. I would like a better balance of coverage of the industry, but the buzz in only on Apple products. Sorry for sounding so hateful, I'll try to relax a bit.

Edited 2010-02-10 18:15 UTC

Reply Score: 2

jasongrieves Member since:
2007-02-15

We meet again darknexus.

The iPad is built on the iPhone OS, but claiming its the only accessible tablet is incorrect. It isn't even the released! Have you used it? Has Apple released what accessibility is built in? I used a Windows XP Tablet PC with screen magnification. Not to mention Windows 7's magnifier actually has support for touch so you can move around the screen with a stylus or touch. The PC Tablet is built on the same Windows kernel and thus many of the accessibilty products I've tried (including screen readers) work well with tablets with keyboards. Your claim that the iPad is the only accessible Tablet is immature and flat out wrong. Just because PC tablets didn't work well for you with a screen reader, doesn't mean it didn't work for the rest of us who use a different type of accessibility.

When you talk about Microsoft's frameworks, please mention the one that has been implemented since Vista, UI Automation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UI_Automation). You're still claiming MSAA is competing with Apple and Linux frameowrks, when for 8 years, UIA has been implemented in both Windows and the .NET frameworks. It also has been implemented in Linux thanks to Microsft and Novell implementing a bridge to at-spi for managed Mono code on Linux. IBM and Microsoft work together in the AIA as well as many other vendors to try to have a better cross platform framework on the operating systems. Even after I sent you this information in our previous posts, you continue to preach how bad MSAA is. If there are specific pieces left out of the UIA architecture that Linux and Apple have, I would love to know what they are.

Most people will mark you up since they don't know about accessibility, but every time you post, you misrepresent Microsoft and PC vendor solutions. Opinions are fine, but you leave out criticial details that most people won't understand. If you post some articles that make its way on to OSNews, be ready to have someone ready to review and rebuttle so those of us who don't have such a narrow and incorrect view of the entire accessibility ecosystem are not misrepresented.

Edited 2010-02-10 20:12 UTC

Reply Score: 1

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

We meet again? I don't recall ever seeing your name around here. I do not count UI automation right now, as very few products actually use it. Perhaps I'm only thinking about myself--I've been accused of that before--but I have absolute no use for a magnifier. None. Further, I'm not including tablets with keyboards as that is a no brainer. Also, I prefer to focus on platforms where I don't have to pay the blind tax of tripple digits or higher. Microsoft does the bare minimum and nothing more, unfortunately. You recall that I said the only accessible out-of-the-box tablet, not the only accessible tablet. This is still true, and given that it has the same Voiceover as the iPhone (yes, it does, I've checked the tech specs) I already know exactly how it will work and how accessible it will be.
Still you have me at a disadvantage. What's this about meeting again?

Reply Score: 2

jasongrieves Member since:
2007-02-15

Original Quote

The iPad is the *only* accessible tablet device right now.

What you're saying now
recall that I said the only accessible out-of-the-box tablet, not the only accessible tablet

You can sit here and tell me a product that isn't even on the market that you haven't used is the only accessible tablet device? Can you point to the spec where it says VoiceOver is included?

Microsoft does the bare minimum and nothing more, unfortunately. You recall that I said the only accessible out-of-the-box tablet, not the only accessible tablet.

Screen Reading does not equal accessibility. Windows 7 featurse a full screen magnfier and full featured On-Screen-Keyboard. Narrator works with the most important parts of the Windows shell and does decently with applications that adhere to the MSAA or UI Automation standard.

Also, I prefer to focus on platforms where I don't have to pay the blind tax of tripple digits or higher.

I think you are doing a disservice to the thousands of accessibility products on a PC. Just because JAWS and other major AT's are hundreds of dollars doesn't mean every accessibility product is that much.
www.microsoft.com/enable/at/matvplist.aspx.

Name one other device (not a standard PC mind you) that is accessible out of the box but not specially designed for the disabled.

Canoical/Ubuntu Accessibility team has this as a major goal for Ubuntu. Windows PC's include features that are accessible out of the box and sufficient for some user with disabilties. Just because the built in screen reader Narrator isn't sufficient for you, doesn't mean the rest of us can't use it out-of-the box.

My friend has a learning disability and can't process the text from Safari. He uses Kurzweil on the Mac to have the text read out. Apple isn't giving him a solution out-of-the-box, but he's paid for vendor software to make it work for him. Again, don't make claims that Apple does everything for everyone that is innacurate.

But it's either the iPad or a netbook right now if you have no vision, as the expensive X86 tablets aren't even worth considering in this case.

That's a ridiculous claim. Take a look at the list of screen readers available.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_screen_readers
Again, you seem to forget other users exist in the world that have different opinions. I have quite a few friends who are enjoying their netbooks with NVDA installed. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NonVisual_Desktop_Access That's a $300 x86 PC using a free screen reader.

It is very saddenning to see such a narrow view on accessibility. Many satisfied users exist on PC's, Linux, and Apple.

Reply Score: 1

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Narrator works with the most important parts of the Windows shell and does decently with applications that adhere to the MSAA or UI Automation standard.


That, right there, tells me you have never used Narrator for anything serious. Ever. If you had, you would know how laughable that statement truly is. I challenge you to shut your eyes, fire up narrator, and read the content on a web page. I do not mean tab around the links, I mean *read* the content. Next, try formatting a document with it--not just writing it out, but formatting it effectively. All from the keyboard, with Narrator, eyes shut the whole time.
After that experience, try saying Narrator is decent with a straight face again. You won't be able to do so, I can guarantee you that.

Reply Score: 2

jasongrieves Member since:
2007-02-15

That, right there, tells me you have never used Narrator for anything serious.

Please read what I write, the Windows Shell does not include IE or Office. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Shell

My friends fall back to Narrator and use it if their third party AT breaks. Microsoft has never claimed their screen reader works with IE or Office.

Reply Score: 1

Nice
by darknexus on Wed 10th Feb 2010 03:21 UTC
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

We're doing accessibility pieces on osnews now? Cool. I've had a few articles in mind comparing the various accessible oses and devices, but didn't think there'd be much interest for them here. Being one who requires a screen reader as I'm totally blind (yes, my visual field is a big fat zero) I've used every accessible os out there. At the same time it makes me wish I could play with more oses as well, as there are few accessible ones relative to the number of oses around.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Nice
by alcibiades on Wed 10th Feb 2010 08:35 UTC in reply to "Nice"
alcibiades Member since:
2005-10-12

This would be a very interesting piece, do please write it. A lot of us would find any notes from experience about what works and does not in the area of disability very valuable. Also whatever you've found about the limits and features of various possible solutions.

Have to say that articles on disability and the iPad strike me about as interesting as articles about Web browsing and OSX, or email and Windows. What is interesting is not the Apple part or iPad connection, but the subject proper.

Sometimes this stuff reminds you of a small time newspaper in which every story seems to be about Nether Wallop, and so we have headlines like 'Global Warming, why it will not hurt Nether Wallop', 'World War II as seen from Nether Wallop', 'Michael Jackson dies outside Nether Wallop', or 'Nuclear War in the Middle East but not in Nether Wallop'. Stop it with this Nether Wallop stuff for goodness' sake!

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Nice
by IndigoJo on Wed 10th Feb 2010 11:05 UTC in reply to "RE: Nice"
IndigoJo Member since:
2005-07-06

Have to say that articles on disability and the iPad strike me about as interesting as articles about Web browsing and OSX, or email and Windows. What is interesting is not the Apple part or iPad connection, but the subject proper.

Sometimes this stuff reminds you of a small time newspaper in which every story seems to be about Nether Wallop, and so we have headlines like 'Global Warming, why it will not hurt Nether Wallop', 'World War II as seen from Nether Wallop', 'Michael Jackson dies outside Nether Wallop', or 'Nuclear War in the Middle East but not in Nether Wallop'. Stop it with this Nether Wallop stuff for goodness' sake!


I've been to Nether Wallop. It's a small village in England with an army base.

I know this site isn't mainly focussed on accessibility issues, but computers and the internet are a lifeline for people with disabilities and many of them need adaptations. Some people can't use a normal computer for one reason or another. I am not disabled myself and have no intention of buying an iPad as I would expect a device this size to run something meatier than a mobile phone OS and have multi-tasking, but clearly it will answer a lot of people's needs even if not mine or yours.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Nice
by alcibiades on Wed 10th Feb 2010 14:38 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Nice"
alcibiades Member since:
2005-10-12

I agree completely about the importance of accessibility, and the interest of more articles about it, particularly from an experienced user point of view. The better informed we are, the more accessible we can make the systems we're responsible for, probably with little extra effort, just a bit more understanding and information.

I was being a bit snarky about the idea of this subject being treated as a feature of the wretched iPad, when its so important in its own right.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Nice
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 10th Feb 2010 09:09 UTC in reply to "Nice"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

We're doing accessibility pieces on osnews now?


I'd indeed *love* to have more on this topic, but the problem - as usual - is that I know nothing about this subject. I don't have a disability (other than my crippling obsession with Fiona Apple, that is), nor do I know anyone who does. As such, it simply goes over my head.

This item was written by a reader (not by me or the staff). I'm hoping we get more of this.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Nice
by darknexus on Wed 10th Feb 2010 10:49 UTC in reply to "RE: Nice"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Thom, I can help with that. ;)
Seriously, if you want more stories or editorials like this I can provide them or write them. Maybe we could bring this topic on the podcast some time, too?

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Nice
by spiderman on Wed 10th Feb 2010 10:55 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Nice"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

podcasts are not accessible!!! Text please!

Edited 2010-02-10 10:55 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Nice
by darknexus on Wed 10th Feb 2010 11:02 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Nice"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

podcasts are not accessible!!! Text please!


I can't tell if that was a joke or an actual stab at the need for accessibility.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Nice
by JAlexoid on Wed 10th Feb 2010 11:56 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Nice"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Technically, text can be converted to the appropriate format for accessibility purposes. Be it text to braille(for the deaf and blind), text to speech(for the blind) or just plain display of text(for the deaf).

Reply Score: 1

RE[6]: Nice
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 10th Feb 2010 19:13 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Nice"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

While that's true, those who cannot read text, usually prefer human voices over the synthesised ones of screen readers. I'd suggest pod cast, recorded as per usual + transcripts. Unfortunately, creating transcripts is a pain. Maybe they could send it through a voice to text program and then just skim the result making corrections as necessary? I don't know how well those actually work.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Nice
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 10th Feb 2010 17:50 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Nice"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I would also really enjoy hearing more about accessibility of products I have a few friends with disabilities that often ask me about various tech products, and I usually have to respond that I simply don't know.

Plus, making a product more accessible often opens up new avenues of use, that we may not have thought about previously. In general a more accessible product is a better over all product, because it means the designers have had to think about how everything is works on a deeper level.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Nice
by spiderman on Wed 10th Feb 2010 10:30 UTC in reply to "Nice"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

I believe GNOME is a very accessible desktop, thanks to at-spi. I've made a friend with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis use it with dasher and opengazer. GNOME comes with Orca and gok. Gok is great, although it is not pretty. If you can use a pointer device, florence is a pretty onscreen keyboards. For speaking, donnerlaparole (java, so works on any desktop) is great, although I've only used if in french and I don't know how it works in english. There are some great tools for Windows but they are very expensive. KDE is not there yet, although it is improving support for at-spi with QT4.

Edited 2010-02-10 10:39 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Nice
by darknexus on Wed 10th Feb 2010 10:45 UTC in reply to "RE: Nice"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Yes, it is at least for now. There may be trouble coming however, seeing as how Oracle has completely pulled out of Sun's commitment to GNOME accessibility and they were a huge driving force behind it. The GNOME accessibility team and project leads have been let go, and this is right in the middle of not only the CORBA -> DBUS switch but also in a major API shift to GNOME 3.0. Those of us in the community are trying to do what we can to salvage the situation, but unless we can get Canonical or someone else with a vested interest in keeping it going the situation could be very rocky in a few months time. I specifically think of Canonical because if they mean what they say about Ubuntu being fully accessible to everybody they'll have to either take up the slack themselves or put some effort forth... if they're serious about what they say, that is.
If GNOME's accessibility falls by the wayside, it would leave OS X as the only other environment that is fully accessible out of the box without paying more than the computer is worth. Not good. I like and use OS X but I've never liked having only one option.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Nice
by spiderman on Wed 10th Feb 2010 10:53 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Nice"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

Nokia/Trolltech has made QT switch to at-spi over dbus. I suspect we are going to see QT applications that take advantage of it in the future. As I said, KDE is not yet on par with GNOME but it as improving a lot these days.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Nice
by darknexus on Wed 10th Feb 2010 10:59 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Nice"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

That won't matter if Orca falls by the wayside, or at-spi itself. The big driving force behind it all was Sun, and that force is gone. QT using at-spi over dbus won't mean a thing if at-spi itself dies.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Nice
by spiderman on Wed 10th Feb 2010 11:10 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Nice"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

But for now, at-spi has the most advanced tools. Maybe Cocoa will replace it one day, I don't know. Maybe the demise of Sun means the end of at-spi, I don't know. What I know is that for now it is the best tool and it is free, so whatever happen to Sun, it is there to stay, even if it does not improve anymore. Other tools may surpass it in the future, I don't know.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Nice
by DeadFishMan on Wed 10th Feb 2010 14:50 UTC in reply to "Nice"
DeadFishMan Member since:
2006-01-09

We're doing accessibility pieces on osnews now? Cool. I've had a few articles in mind comparing the various accessible oses and devices, but didn't think there'd be much interest for them here. Being one who requires a screen reader as I'm totally blind (yes, my visual field is a big fat zero) I've used every accessible os out there. At the same time it makes me wish I could play with more oses as well, as there are few accessible ones relative to the number of oses around.


If you find the time and are willing to, I'd really appreciate if you could put an article together about the subject to be posted on OSNews. It is one thing to know about the accessibility issues and measures taken to work around them and it is another thing to listen to the opinion of a person who needs and uses such features on a daily basis. I am pretty sure that it will be an awesome read!

Edited 2010-02-10 14:55 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Nice
by jeshyr on Thu 11th Feb 2010 07:22 UTC in reply to "Nice"
jeshyr Member since:
2010-02-10

I might be new around here but I'd be really interested in content like this too. Please write your article!

Reply Score: 1

The iPad
by spiderman on Wed 10th Feb 2010 14:38 UTC
spiderman
Member since:
2008-10-23

I don't know what is wrong with the media today. We are going to hear about the iPad for months, at the rate of 2 or 3 stories a day, like it was the only tablet around. I know disabled people who have been using tablet PC for years with GNOME.
A braille keyboard can be plugged to the iPad? WTF? any computer with usb support can support a braille keyboard!

Edited 2010-02-10 14:45 UTC

Reply Score: 2

iJoke
by Zyyx on Wed 10th Feb 2010 20:52 UTC
Zyyx
Member since:
2008-10-23

Its funny how hard people are trying to make it out again to be something special. This is almost as bad as Sarah Palin touting her child with disabilities to the public in an attempt to win sympathy. (yes I read the original articles but the title of this one and comments are guilty). Pathetic. Why not buy a cheaper, more versatile, with more applications which are already enabled for access by those with disabilities? Oh, yah I forgot, its made by apple. Sorry, but people are trying WAY too hard to make this thing out to be anything more than an overpriced, laptop/tablet missing tons of features but with total hardware lock in. Let the thumbs down begin as you know you want to because its all about being in the apple tribe. Not what actually makes sense. (Im referring to this write up on osnews) This has NOTHING to do with people with disabilities. It has EVERYTHING to do with Mac Heads trying to promote an obviously stupid product from their god corporation. Ill give it this. Its kind of entertaining. Its like watching a car sales man make crap up about why you should buy this-> car.

Reply Score: 0

RE: iJoke
by darknexus on Wed 10th Feb 2010 21:18 UTC in reply to "iJoke"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Simple question for you then: Name one other device (not a standard PC mind you) that is accessible out of the box but not specially designed for the disabled. Go on. Name one. Actually, I'll make it easier for you. Name one other company doing what Apple is currently doing: i.e. making devices accessible to everyone they can without forcing extra cost and not designing specialized devices.
I'm not an Apple fanboy, and I have no use for the iPad. But they're setting a very important precedent here and that has to be acknowledged.

Reply Score: 2