Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 11th Jun 2010 21:24 UTC
Google We don't get too many details when it comes to Google's Chrome OS, but this tiny little tidbit dug up by The Register is certainly quite interesting. It looks as if Google is working on implementing remote desktop-like functionality into Chrome OS so you can directly control applications running on other computers within the browser.
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What's with the stupid names?
by phoenix on Fri 11th Jun 2010 22:23 UTC
phoenix
Member since:
2005-07-11

Stop making up stupid names for existing things.

Remote desktop access is nothing new, so it doesn't need a new name.

And it's not rocket science to make this happen. The NX Client has a java version that runs in the browser. We use this all the time for staff/students that have issues installing the full NX Client on their Windows/Mac/Linux computer.

There are java versions of rdesktop and VNC as well.

There's nothing new here. So it doesn't need a new name.

Reply Score: 4

RE: What's with the stupid names?
by vivainio on Fri 11th Jun 2010 22:43 UTC in reply to "What's with the stupid names?"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26


There's nothing new here. So it doesn't need a new name.


We don't know it yet.

BTW, handy tip for citrix users - if you can open msoffice documents on your citrix server, you can embed an OLE object that opens cmd.exe. After that, you'll get a somewhat more flexible citrix environment ;-).

Reply Score: 3

No it will use RDP
by nt_jerkface on Sat 12th Jun 2010 05:49 UTC in reply to "RE: What's with the stupid names?"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Using anything else with Windows makes zero sense.

They're just going to stick rdesktop in their browser and act like they created something new.

Maybe they will also include OpenSSH and call it ChromeShellMagic.

Reply Score: 2

mkools Member since:
2005-10-11

"
There's nothing new here. So it doesn't need a new name.


We don't know it yet.

BTW, handy tip for citrix users - if you can open msoffice documents on your citrix server, you can embed an OLE object that opens cmd.exe. After that, you'll get a somewhat more flexible citrix environment ;-).
"

That's a stupid tip I'm sorry. I'm a Citrix engineer and we hate user's like you trying to get around system security and screw up our servers ;)

Command prompt is easy to block with a group policy though, every admin does that so you shouldn't even be able to run commands like regedit, cmd etc. so I don't know what kind of sysop you got there but he must be really incompetent ;)

Reply Score: 2

BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

that's what we like, cmd access from MS office documents. I like to lock my remote users out of stuff, not give them the ability to run commands.

Reply Score: 2

RE: What's with the stupid names?
by darknexus on Sat 12th Jun 2010 02:57 UTC in reply to "What's with the stupid names?"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Stop making up stupid names for existing things.


I'm pretty sure we call that marketing. ;)

Reply Score: 6

As Jerkface said on his blog...
by Neolander on Sat 12th Jun 2010 05:25 UTC
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

...and it was one of those days where we pretty much agreed on a subject...

Google, just nuke ChromeOS. Now. It's almost certainly made to fail, and it will hurt both you and all other alternative OSs...

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Kroc
by Kroc on Sat 12th Jun 2010 06:28 UTC
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

It’s for admin access in a corporate setting. Remember that Google plan to eventually have their regular non-engineering staff use ChromeOS and to do that, remote access is a must for troubleshooting.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by Kroc
by kragil on Sat 12th Jun 2010 10:34 UTC in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
kragil Member since:
2006-01-04

Could be, but I think Google is the kind of company that thinks big. So I think Google wants to virtualize everything that might be crucial from our "old" desktops.

You want to print?
Install our cloud print server and you can do it.

You want to run that one special windows application that you really really need and can't live without?
Install our chromotion server and select that app to be available to your ChromeOS device.(Chromotion server scans the application and reject things like DirectX games etc.) Easy.


Those two things alone ease the migration to ChromeOS a lot.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by Kroc
by phoenix on Mon 14th Jun 2010 02:47 UTC in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

You have it backwards. This isn't about remote access to a system running ChromeOS. This is an app that runs on ChromeOS that allows you to remotely access anything system to run a "legacy" app (as in, anything not running on ChromeOS).

Remote access to ChromeOS is called OpenSSH and X.

Reply Score: 2

broken link
by another_sam on Sat 12th Jun 2010 10:32 UTC
another_sam
Member since:
2009-08-19
Neat
by Anyone on Sat 12th Jun 2010 16:44 UTC
Anyone
Member since:
2005-11-16

Ok glad to hear it. Does that mean we can expect some fixes to the NeatX server code ? Please

Reply Score: 1

NX to the Cloud
by Lobotomik on Sun 13th Jun 2010 16:49 UTC
Lobotomik
Member since:
2006-01-03

I am sure that Google does not intend users to remote desktop into their Windows PCs, but rather that they use full desktop apps that run on Google servers but display on the user screen via internet-optimized X.

An instance of OpenOffice running on their servers would be enough for hundreds or thousands of users, and these users would perceive it to be as fast as it would be on a fast desktop PC, although they would be using a cheap netbook with a low-power ARM device.

I think of OpenOffice because GoogleDocs is hardly a powerhouse office suite; and why spend time and money turning it into one, when the added complesity might be undesirable for its intended users, and when there is an alternative for power users available today, for free?

Of course, the same stands for many other Linux desktop apps, maybe after passing some sort of quality assurance by Google.

Reply Score: 3

Legacy? Google needs to grow up
by Shannara on Mon 14th Jun 2010 02:10 UTC
Shannara
Member since:
2005-07-06

Desktop applications are not legacy applications. In fact, it can be argued that your data is safer with desktop applications then the "cloud" where its open to any kind of corrupt/criminal government agencies/courts/judges.

Reply Score: 3

Why bother is ChromeOS?
by kittynipples on Mon 14th Jun 2010 13:10 UTC
kittynipples
Member since:
2006-08-02

So the point is Google recognizes that running baby versions of productivity apps in a browser is cute and all, but when serious works needs to be done, remote access to your real OS is available. So, just skip the middleman then and don't bother with ChromeOS.

Reply Score: 1