Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 19th Aug 2010 22:28 UTC
Multimedia, AV You know, I really like America and its citizens. Beautiful country, lovely people, nothing but good experiences on my end. However, like everyone else, the US has its problems, and one particular annoying one is the power of lobby and interests groups. I couldn't believe my eyes when I read that the RIAA and NAB (National Association of Broadcasters) are asking Congress to mandate FM chips in all portable devices - cell phones, mp3 players, PDAs, everything. Wait, what?
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Someone explain this to me ...
by WorknMan on Thu 19th Aug 2010 22:38 UTC
WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

How does having an FM radio chip in every phone offer more choices to consumers, when radio (at least in the US) simply plays the same crap over and over? (And why the hell do they assume the term 'consumers' is appropriate in this context?

FM radio is like so 2001. These days, I stream Slacker radio from my phone while in the car. On those rare occasions I don't have my phone with me, the FM radio in my car is tuned to the local top 40 station, and I shit you not... I hear Katy Perry's 'California Gurls' every time I get in the car. And I mean EVERY TIME... on the same station. Without exception. Even during 10 minute commutes they're playing it.

I say forget torture and waterboarding... our government should just put terrorists in a room and play this f**king song over and over again until they beg for mercy. They could also play Lil Wayne, but that would truly be cruel and unusual punishment.

Reply Score: 10

techweenie1 Member since:
2008-10-15

2001?! FM Radio has been dead for ages..FM Radio is so 1981!! I stopped listening to FM Radio in the 1990s because it stopped playing anything worth listening to....this is basically more failed "stimulus" thrown at me and you, for the purpose of keeping a failed business on life support. Mind you that FM could flourish if it actually played something that people aside from illegals, teenagers and thugs could enjoy.

Reply Score: 3

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

2001?! FM Radio has been dead for ages..


Well, I said 2001 because that's the year that satellite radio came out. Before then, there really was no 'radio-like' alternative that you could get in your car, AFAIK. I wasn't referring to a particular year that FM started to suck ;)

Reply Score: 2

M.Onty Member since:
2009-10-23

Here in the UK, despite DAB being introduced some time back, FM goes from strength to strength. The gov.t has said it plans to shut off FM by 2015 (I think), but still the bidding for frequencies is huge---dwarfing DAB.

And of course with regard to it being 'failed' in the sense of not being interest, having the BBC helps keep things pretty high quality with the comedy, drama &c.

Reply Score: 1

ozonehole Member since:
2006-01-07

Thank you for posting about DAB, I hadn't even heard of it, let alone knew that some governments were planning to force FM off the air to make way for DAB.

I see that Wikipedia has a very useful page on DAB:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Audio_Broadcast

After reading about it, I certainly hope that FM broadcasts continue. DAB comes with some heavy baggage: far more expensive to implement, worse reception, uses 3 times more electrical power than FM.

It sounds to me like DAB only benefits the government that wants to sell the FM spectrum to private industry. I don't know much about the UK, but in the USA, the much-ballyhooed switch to digital TV resulted in Verizon buying up all the bandwidth, which they are now sitting on. Their motive in buying it seems to have been to keep others from using it.

It's my understanding that a lot of that "freed bandwidth" (which was in the valuable 700 mHz range), had it remained in the public domain, could have given us a wireless Internet of amazing quality. But it didn't happen. Other countries could, of course, do things differently, but the influence of the USA on standards is such that I doubt it will happen.

Edited 2010-08-20 01:09 UTC

Reply Score: 5

vodoomoth Member since:
2010-03-30

In France, I've heard that the horizon for shutting off FM is even sooner, some time starting in 2011. By mid-2012, there will be no traditional FM broadcasting. Yet, not a word about it in the media. The contrast is really sharp, compared to the loud fuss we've had about digital TV and the shutting off of analog TV transmissions. As if reality shows had turned everybody into brainless zombies caring only about their next fix and the volume of their dose.

IIRC, I had an FM radio chip in each of the 3 MP3 players I've had since 2002 or 2003. To be honest, I've probably never listened to a single show on the last one, and I've had it for two years now...

Useless as far as I'm concerned. I can't understand either what practical purpose a mandatory FM chip would serve. Television has become somewhat useless too. Reality shows are a no go for me. I watch the half-dozen TV series I'm addicted to mainly via torrents and streaming. My television set is for documentaries about animals, the national news at 20:00 when I'm in the mood, and for hearing English on CNN. That's about it. Sad world.

Reply Score: 1

aaronb Member since:
2005-07-06

There is also Digital Radio Mondiale for use below 30mHz that is proposed to replace AM (LW, MW, SW) radio.

http://drm.org/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Radio_Mondiale

Reply Score: 2

RE: Someone explain this to me ...
by matako on Fri 20th Aug 2010 07:34 UTC in reply to "Someone explain this to me ..."
matako Member since:
2009-02-13

On those rare occasions I don't have my phone with me, the FM radio in my car is tuned to the local top 40 station, and I shit you not... I hear Katy Perry's 'California Gurls' every time I get in the car. And I mean EVERY TIME...


Question...
Why is it that every time
I turn on the radio,
I hear the same five songs
fifteen times a day for three months?

Man...
FUNK DAT!
Get a new DJ!

(Sagat, Funk Dat)

Reply Score: 0

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

In a five minute carpool ride from work to home, I've easily hear the latest "hot" song more than three times. How to kill an interesting song dead; add it to radio. Why play lots of great music when you can overplay a few songs into repetitive oblivion. It's like english cooking; boil it 'till the flavor's gone and the structure is mush.

So, now that the radio broadcasters are driving away customers and/or not keeping up with technology, they want to mandate radio FM radio receivers in all devices. I don't recall the AM folks trying to mandate receivers for that band when FM eclipsed them. I haven't seen any historical record of the ice delivery industry trying to mandate ice consumption when refrigeration eclipsed the basic icebox.

In the US it's worse with the FCC granting duopoly over digital radio which effecively destroyed any possability of natural market competition. Even better that they said "ok, you two companies can have digital radio but you are barred from ever merging". There, that will insure competition right? A few short years ago 'uh, we both spent all the money you gave us to start this industry and we're both going to be bankrupt unless you let us merge' - "oh, well, alright then".. and now the US has a monopoly owned digital radio industry. Bravo!!

(I'm unsure if we're any different north of the border or if we're just as hosed by having only he US digial radio providers in our regions.)

Reply Score: 3

Chicken Blood Member since:
2005-12-21

It's like english cooking; boil it 'till the flavor's gone and the structure is mush.


What? The 1950s called, they want their dumbassed stereotypes back!

Reply Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Sorry, does the analogy based on stereotyped boiled everything cooking, though out of date, not match up to the the affect of public radio boiling the life out of any initially interesting music by overplaying it?

Reply Score: 2

Chicken Blood Member since:
2005-12-21

Sorry, does the analogy based on stereotyped boiled everything cooking, though out of date, not match up to the the affect of public radio boiling the life out of any initially interesting music by overplaying it?


I wouldn't know. I listen to national public radio and they don't do that at all. In fact I find it to have some of the most stimulating content out there. Mind you, they don't play much music.
Maybe you are referring to commercial radio.

Reply Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I couldn't help but hear the Spongebob Squarepants character Squidworth's pretentious "*I* listen to public radio" in my head when reading your comment. You clearly understood that the overplaying of pop music was related to commercial radio else you wouldn't have made such a point of differentiating.. but hey, whatever helps you sleep at night..

Reply Score: 2

Chicken Blood Member since:
2005-12-21

I couldn't help but hear the Spongebob Squarepants character Squidworth's pretentious "*I* listen to public radio" in my head when reading your comment.


OK, I guess that explains a lot.
Sorry that you find listening to public radio pretentious. Wait, no I'm not.

You clearly understood that the overplaying of pop music was related to commercial radio else you wouldn't have made such a point of differentiating.. but hey, whatever helps you sleep at night..


Ooh, see what you did there? WANK.

Edited 2010-08-22 20:03 UTC

Reply Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I don't find listening to public radio pretentious at all but I do find your need to mention it when you clearly understood the reference regarding commercial radio highly pretentious.

I'm willing to listen though. Why was my comment about English cuisine so offensive to you as to justify this many replies to what was a passing humerous use? You may very well have a reason for taking such offense and I'm willing to listen. Why do you take a generalized reference to a known joke about English cuisine so personally?

Reply Score: 2

ssa2204 Member since:
2006-04-22

" It's like english cooking; boil it 'till the flavor's gone and the structure is mush.


What? The 1950s called, they want their dumbassed stereotypes back!
"

Ummm...as a born Englishman, who lives in America (land of cuisine from the world over) I have to agree with that assessment of English cuisine. It made me laugh as it pretty much describes my parents and grandparents cooking (which I freaking hated). Yeah, as much as I would like to say this is 1950s stereotype, unfortunately visits to relatives says otherwise.

Reply Score: 2

jgagnon Member since:
2008-06-24

While in the USA, everything is fried into oblivion...

Reply Score: 1

Chicken Blood Member since:
2005-12-21

"[q] It's like english cooking; boil it 'till the flavor's gone and the structure is mush.


What? The 1950s called, they want their dumbassed stereotypes back!
"

Ummm...as a born Englishman, who lives in America (land of cuisine from the world over) I have to agree with that assessment of English cuisine. It made me laugh as it pretty much describes my parents and grandparents cooking (which I freaking hated). Yeah, as much as I would like to say this is 1950s stereotype, unfortunately visits to relatives says otherwise. [/q]

I'm a born Englishman who works in America too. I guess backgrounds vary. Who'd have thought?

Reply Score: 2

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

In the US it's worse with the FCC granting duopoly over digital radio which effecively destroyed any possability of natural market competition. Even better that they said "ok, you two companies can have digital radio but you are barred from ever merging". There, that will insure competition right? A few short years ago 'uh, we both spent all the money you gave us to start this industry and we're both going to be bankrupt unless you let us merge' - "oh, well, alright then".. and now the US has a monopoly owned digital radio industry. Bravo!!


Eh, that's alright... with services like Slacker, Pandora, etc, satellite radio's days are numbered anyway. Just wait until they get this technology built into car stereos, so you don't have to stream them from your phone anymore.

Reply Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Consider that the analog spectrum was auctioned out to many different carriers including segments set aside for non-profit and personal use. The digital spectrum was sold wholesale to two companies that later merged into one; no non-profit or private segments set aside. You might not be streaming slacker over expensive cell networks if competitive digital radio broadcasters where allowed spectrum. Thing's happened differently in europe so that may also be an indication of how digital radio could have evolved here with healthy competition allowed.

Reply Score: 2

StychoKiller Member since:
2005-09-20

Check out www.kuvo.org for the best jazz station in the world! Long live the "Oasis in the City!"

Reply Score: 1

Stupid, but
by kragil on Thu 19th Aug 2010 22:46 UTC
kragil
Member since:
2006-01-04

FM chips are tiny and cheap and usually the head set is the antenna and they don't use any battery when you don't use them. So not that big a deal.

My phone has a FM chip and I have used it only once in 2 years .. but I guess it costs next to nothing and being able to listen to football (real football, the European type) if I wanted to is kinda nice although I don't use it.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Stupid, but
by phoenix on Thu 19th Aug 2010 22:56 UTC in reply to "Stupid, but "
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

FM chips are tiny and cheap and usually the head set is the antenna and they don't use any battery when you don't use them. So not that big a deal.


That's the biggest problem with FM tuners in cell phones: they rely on a headphone cable for the antenna. Which means, you can't use the FM tuner with any kind of Bluetooth headset. IOW, it's pretty useless for those of us that have BT headsets, or BT speakers of any kind.

I like listening to the radio now and again, but can't stand the non-standard, bulky connector on my Sony Ericsson w580i phone. So I use a pair of BT headphones. Which means I can't listen to the radio. Even with an (almost full) 8 GB M2 card installed, I get bored of my music, and I also enjoy listening to the CBC now and then. But I can't.

Catch-22.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Stupid, but
by bitwelder on Fri 20th Aug 2010 06:45 UTC in reply to "Stupid, but "
bitwelder Member since:
2010-04-27

... but I guess it costs next to nothing...

But even so, multiply that 'next to nothing' for the overall production volume of portable devices, and you'll get a pretty noticeable cost (which of course will be charged on consumers shoulders).

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Stupid, but
by Timmmm on Fri 20th Aug 2010 16:38 UTC in reply to "RE: Stupid, but "
Timmmm Member since:
2006-07-25

No, these days wifi, bluetooth, and FM are all provided by the same chip, so there is no extra cost really.

Reply Score: 2

Positives
by gloucestershrubhill on Thu 19th Aug 2010 23:20 UTC
gloucestershrubhill
Member since:
2010-08-10

I live in rural England and - frankly - I always choose a mobile device *with* an FM receiver. An iPhone or even a Nexus One are useless to me since streaming over our painfully slow local EDGE network simply won't work. We also have an incredibly good national spoken word service in BBC Radio 4, and I'm loathe to be without it in the background when I'm out and about.

There's this automatic snobbery about "legacy" technologies like FM radio in the tech world, but for the moment this supposedly obsolete format offers me and others like me the only viable way of consuming live audio on the go. Sure, I could move to a 3G area, but should I have to? FM chips are a real boon, and the main reason I've stuck with my trusty Nokia e71.

Edited 2010-08-19 23:21 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Positives
by Elv13 on Fri 20th Aug 2010 03:10 UTC in reply to "Positives"
Elv13 Member since:
2006-06-12

Many of those headset, iPhone included are probably capable of playing FM. Some said that the Nike chip for Apple+Nike stuff is able to play FM station, but there is not software/driver for it. I don't know if it is true, but it may be like bluetooth, just a software update away. Apple have FM on the Nano with some software to buy song from iTunes if you love it (the next time you connect the device). I really don't understand why the iPhone does not have this feature.

Reply Score: 1

Corporatism
by jjmckay on Thu 19th Aug 2010 23:34 UTC
jjmckay
Member since:
2005-11-11

This is yet another example of corporatism. Here is a video to better understand the chronic issues we have here with corporations partnering with government.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Y9-Y4lSU64

Reply Score: 3

At least this is technically possible
by seanpk on Thu 19th Aug 2010 23:39 UTC
seanpk
Member since:
2009-11-17

every device _could_ have an FM receiver, unlike this other brilliant piece of proposed legislation:
http://yro.slashdot.org/story/10/08/17/0138259/Legislation-To-Make-...

my big problem is all the radio I like to listen to is on the AM band ... its hard to find a device that has an AM receiver ... maybe I should start lobbying

Reply Score: 2

Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

my big problem is all the radio I like to listen to is on the AM band ... its hard to find a device that has an AM receiver ... maybe I should start lobbying


I think the basic idea is just a short-term idea. How long will FM radio be present? I mean, all things tend to get digital, so FM radio, as well as AM radio, is about to die, just like analog TV per antenna has died. At least in Germany, analog TV has been 99% abandoned, so I'm just curious when analog FM radio will follow.

Maybe the initiators of the requirement see that pressing more money out of FM radio has to be done within the next years - just before it vanishes and you can't squeeze any money from it.

Oh, and if the station you want to listen to is on AM - it's a different frequency band than FM, which usually is around 100 MHz +/- 20 Mhz. By the way, maybe there will be hacks around that allow extending the allowed frequency range of the FM receiver to listen to police radio as well? And maybe with another little modification, ordinary smartphones can be turned into full-featured radio scanners with digital descrambler, in which case it maybe would be illegal, but... :-)

Reply Score: 2

next
by Mellin on Thu 19th Aug 2010 23:54 UTC
Mellin
Member since:
2005-07-06

a law that forces everyone to listen to music radio at least 5 hours a day

Reply Score: 5

RE: next
by Brendan on Fri 20th Aug 2010 10:11 UTC in reply to "next"
Brendan Member since:
2005-11-16

Hi,

Next, USA passes a law saying all mobile devices must have 15-inch or larger wide screen LCD (due to pressure from the American Pornography Association)...

- Brendan

Reply Score: 6

RE: next
by WereCatf on Fri 20th Aug 2010 13:00 UTC in reply to "next"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

a law that forces everyone to listen to music radio at least 5 hours a day

Ouch, that'd be annoying! I haven't listened to radio since about 1998 and I don't even want to, it's just so much easier to throw a few hundred of my favorite songs on a USB-stick and play them from there in the car, or even better use Last.fm/Spotify client on my phone and just click "Next" if it starts playing a song I don't like. Sure, Spotify costs 9.99€ a month, but they've got a HUGE collection of music, I can create playlists of my own or select what genres I want to play on random, and I am allowed always to just press Next. No way regular FM radio can beat that.

Reply Score: 3

Comment by jjmckay
by jjmckay on Fri 20th Aug 2010 00:03 UTC
jjmckay
Member since:
2005-11-11

Here's another YT vid that calls out the US economic system:

http://www.youtube.com/user/RTAmerica#p/u/45/W1DchGc07TY

Reply Score: 2

Dead On
by johjeff on Fri 20th Aug 2010 00:05 UTC
johjeff
Member since:
2007-11-06

About government meddling in way too many areas. They seem to be hell bent on controlling every aspect of our lives. Orwell anyone?

On a side note, If they have to interfere, couldn't they AT LEAST mandate HD Radio?

Edited 2010-08-20 00:08 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: Dead On
by cerbie on Tue 24th Aug 2010 03:52 UTC in reply to "Dead On"
cerbie Member since:
2006-01-02

Why mandate HD Radio? There's nothing HD about it.

Reply Score: 2

Competition is already making this happen
by asharism on Fri 20th Aug 2010 00:05 UTC
asharism
Member since:
2005-06-30

Most feature phones already ship with FM tuners and now smartphones ship with them too.

In Asia, almost all phone, including the $20 phone have FM tuners.
If the RIAA and the other agencies do not really need to do anything to make this happen - it already is.

In don't understand why they want to take such stupid steps.

Reply Score: 1

penny arcade broke this to me
by stabbyjones on Fri 20th Aug 2010 00:33 UTC
stabbyjones
Member since:
2008-04-15

I read the last strip on penny arcade and thought it was a joke but really they weren't far off.

http://art.penny-arcade.com/photos/973723162_L3YAQ-L.jpg

I have actively avoided listening to radio for at least the last decade so this could probably be described as: "You don't listen to radio? well you just paid us some money, cheers"

Reply Score: 3

Good idea, stupid law
by Zifre on Fri 20th Aug 2010 00:48 UTC
Zifre
Member since:
2009-10-04

Here is my take:

Having an FM tuner in every device would be "nice". It is cheap, and would use very little power or space. Many phones already include FM tuners for this reason. If I were to buy a cell phone (which I don't ever plan to do), I might look for one with an FM tuner, because I do like free legal music.

However, that doesn't mean it would be a good law. Not everyone wants an FM tuner. And it's ridiculous that corporations can just buy laws because they want to. This is a perfect example of how backwards our government is. When the government regulates something in order to benefit people (e.g. health care), we complain. But if it benefits corporations, then it's okay.

Reply Score: 4

RIAA Tries to Maintain Control
by organgtool on Fri 20th Aug 2010 01:06 UTC
organgtool
Member since:
2010-02-25

Radio is the traditional way that record labels provide exposure to new artists that they're trying to promote. If radio becomes irrelevant then the record labels won't have a way of forcing exposure to their new wares. With the reduced cost of recording songs and the power of the internet, it is now possible to become massively popular without requiring a record label to sign you, loan you recording money, and pay the radio stations to play your music. The record industry is quickly losing control and relevance and they are trying to legislate control of this industry back to themselves.

I am very interested in how this plays out. The U.S. doesn't even pretend to be anything other than a corporatocracy anymore, so I wouldn't be surprised if this legislation was introduced. This would fly in the face of all U.S. citizens since the only ones who really benefit are the RIAA (the NAB loses since they would now have to pay $100 million for broadcasting rights they already have).

Reply Score: 7

RE: RIAA Tries to Maintain Control
by r_a_trip on Mon 23rd Aug 2010 09:35 UTC in reply to "RIAA Tries to Maintain Control"
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

The record industry is quickly losing control and relevance and they are trying to legislate control of this industry back to themselves.

It seems like it, but it is a pipe dream. The RIAA and the NAB could buy legislation to mandate an FM chip in anything that has an electrical circuit in it, it wouldn't help them stay relevant.

The problem is not access to FM radio. Access to FM technology is ample and cheap. If FM radio is waning in the US (don't know, because I'm from the old continent), it is most likely because FM radio is not transmitting what people want to hear.

Some people will earn a few bucks on extra FM chips. It won't revive a dying FM culture if the broadcasters don't alter their act. This is legislation which will just add some more unused circuitery to mobile PCB's.

It is yet another example why the old entertainment institutions are doomed to vanish. Instead of transforming into agile, customer oriented, on demand content providers, they just try to keep their old dying business model alive by trying to legislate everybody back to the 1980's.

Reply Score: 2

bugjacobs
Member since:
2009-01-03

The JR Ewings of America has much too much power still ... If anyone remembers that guy from the show Dallas and how he was :-) Oil business ... Record business .. dont matter .. And the Montgomery Burns'es..

Reply Score: 1

Quick way to defeat this bill
by Almafeta on Fri 20th Aug 2010 06:25 UTC
Almafeta
Member since:
2007-02-22

Imply that this bill will soon require pacemakers will soon be required to have FM tracking chips implanted in them. The Voting Lobby Of Americans Who Believe Tracking Chips Are Legitimate soon after will have this thing shot down like a vice president's hunting partner.

Reply Score: 2

Same everywhere
by Karitku on Fri 20th Aug 2010 07:15 UTC
Karitku
Member since:
2006-01-12

As it turns out, radio stations in the US do not have to pay performance rights to labels and artists due to a special exemption in copyright law; only songwriters are compensated.


As far as I know same law is in all western countries. It makes sense since radio plays are seen as advertisement of band, not songwriter.
Here is sources where band make money:
- Gigs
- Records
- Possible fan junk

And here is how songwriters and composers make money:
- Radio plays
- Records

Reply Score: 2

Tax dollars well spent
by Malakim on Fri 20th Aug 2010 08:09 UTC
Malakim
Member since:
2007-04-03

Surely this must be the best possible use of the tax payer's dollars? To have the government meddle in things that is of absoulte zero importance to the society.

Reply Score: 1

Letter of the law
by Almafeta on Fri 20th Aug 2010 09:34 UTC
Almafeta
Member since:
2007-02-22

Would it meet the legal requirements to produce a device that had a FM chip with antenna on-board, but not hooked into the rest of the system? You'd have to spend a bit on engineering the board and case, and on the chip of course, but it wouldn't actively degrade performance or require actual code or firmware recreation.

Reply Score: 2

Disgruntled American
by bolomkxxviii on Fri 20th Aug 2010 11:12 UTC
bolomkxxviii
Member since:
2006-05-19

So this is what our government has sunk to? 13+ Trillion dollars in debt, two wars, unemployment at 10% (16% if you don't fudge the numbers), health care costs spiraling out of control and all they worry about is adding a fading technology to our phones? The FM chips might be cheap but someone has to pay for the engineering to put it in the phone.

If you have an iphone if you hold it wrong will you lose FM reception?

I have a Sansa Clip+ MP3 player. It came with an FM radio built in. I have listened to the radio exactly 0 times even though I use the player daily.

Reply Score: 2

I hate congress
by Bounty on Fri 20th Aug 2010 16:44 UTC
Bounty
Member since:
2006-09-18

I'd like to get a marker and a copy of the complete set of laws that apply in the US + California (where I live.) It would probably fill a warehouse. Then I'd sit down with my marker and highlight at most 100 sentences, then throw the rest out.

Reply Score: 2

luv my cc Witness
by nboxer on Fri 20th Aug 2010 17:32 UTC
nboxer
Member since:
2006-12-11

I have been using my Crane Witness for 2 years now.
It has AM/FM and can record multiple programs like Tivo onto SD cards. Plenty of people listen to AM programs. Just FM is useless. If you gonna have FM
might as well add AM as well. Why not add HD radio
too..

Reply Score: 1

missing the point
by rebel787 on Fri 20th Aug 2010 20:22 UTC
rebel787
Member since:
2007-01-13

A few posters have got some kind of grip on what's happening. Most of the readers don't. Apple's business model is the envy of many competitors. I think these guys wants to do the same.

Reply Score: 1

coreyography
Member since:
2009-03-06

If most of these embedded FM radios work as poorly as the one does on my phone, the NAB will be screwing themselves. I tried the FM on my HTC Incredible exactly once; I live somewhat far away from the transmission towers (in a major metro market), but it could not pick up _one channel_ clearly, and only two or three stations at all.

My car, and even my home stereo, do far better.

I guess we are not paying but a few cents for the FM, since as someone else commented, it's on-chip with the Bluetooth and wifi (at least in my phone). But if people listen to FM as much as I don't, the NAB will just be giving away $100 million.

Of course, the fact that I only listen to college/public radio on FM anyway means I'm not going to be one of the NAB's benefactors anyway.

Edited 2010-08-20 23:36 UTC

Reply Score: 1

House and Congress?
by jack_perry on Sat 21st Aug 2010 03:02 UTC
jack_perry
Member since:
2005-07-06

in both the House and Congress


Should read,

in both the House and Senate

Reply Score: 2

Stupid
by abraxas on Sat 21st Aug 2010 14:20 UTC
abraxas
Member since:
2005-07-07

Whatever happened to the "Free Market"?

As a side note I have an MP3 player with a FM tuner. The only time I have ever used it was when I checking out all the features right after I bought it.

Edited 2010-08-21 14:24 UTC

Reply Score: 2

pfft
by Wodenhelm on Sat 21st Aug 2010 21:40 UTC
Wodenhelm
Member since:
2010-07-16

They're just mad because we're finally listening to what WE wanna hear, and not what Republican Clear Channel wants us to hear. I have FM available to me everywhere, and I still refuse to use it. Screw them.

Reply Score: 1

Why only FM?
by wingnut2292 on Sun 22nd Aug 2010 08:02 UTC
wingnut2292
Member since:
2006-05-12

Why would it have to be a strictly FM-tuner? Outside of sports, the classical music station, I listen to the AM band (specifically 760-WJR) much more than I do the FM band.

Though today most of this is moot. I listen to at least half of my radio listening is via live streams, as any station that has a sense of survival broadcasts online. The only way I'd use an actual radio feature if it reduced bandwidth costs, and if I'm charged by the byte... I'd probably upgrade my plan or start looking for a different carrier.

Shoot, soon it's going to be personalities broadcasting online, instead of stations. Dr. Laura could charge a quarter for the listener's phone call to her and probably make money.

Reply Score: 2

PDAs
by Lion on Sun 22nd Aug 2010 19:09 UTC
Lion
Member since:
2007-03-22

"cell phones, mp3 players, PDAs, everything. "
Does any company still produce PDAs? I've been seeing this term around again quite a bit lately, but does a market for these devices still exist? Surely they have been completely displaced by smartphones?

Reply Score: 2