Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 23rd Sep 2010 20:06 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless So, we have the iPad out and about for a while now, doing its thing, most likely selling well. Of course, others want a piece of that pie as well, so we see tablets pop up all over the place, most of which are either ultra-low budget junk or vapourware (how that's Adam coming along, Notion Ink?). Earlier this year, Steve Ballmer proudly held up HP's Windows 7-powered Slate - but then, HP bought Palm, canned the Slate, promised a webOS tablet, and then resurrected the Slate as an enterprise product. Now we have a video of the Windows 7-powered Slate. Let's compare it to Samsung's detailed overview of its Galaxy Tab, and see ever so clearly why HP canned the darn thing in the first place.
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Wow!
by mrstep on Thu 23rd Sep 2010 21:15 UTC
mrstep
Member since:
2009-07-18

The Win7 as tablet thing just doesn't quite work, as you say, even if it's a decent desktop OS.

Alternately, the Samsung tablet seems more reasonable, which it should be given that they seem to have ripped off every feature they could (including the look of opening a book, page turning, coverflow knock-off for their media player, the look of the calendar, the home screen swiping, etc., etc., etc.) from the iPad. Jeez. "Gentlemen, start your copiers!" doesn't need to be aimed at Microsoft this time around.

Not that the icons and interface elements look as nice on Android, but if imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, I guess Apple should be awfully flattered.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Wow!
by Thom_Holwerda on Thu 23rd Sep 2010 21:39 UTC in reply to "Wow!"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

page turning


Uhm, dude. Page turning wasn't invented by Apple. It was invented about 2000 years ago when the first codex as invented.

Reply Score: 7

RE[2]: Wow!
by StephenBeDoper on Thu 23rd Sep 2010 23:33 UTC in reply to "RE: Wow!"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

"page turning


Uhm, dude. Page turning wasn't invented by Apple. It was invented about 2000 years ago when the first codex as invented.
"

Even the computer-based page flip animation isn't *that* new:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwqi9HnN17w
(it's around the 1:50 mark)

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Wow!
by mrstep on Fri 24th Sep 2010 02:05 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Wow!"
mrstep Member since:
2009-07-18

OK, thanks for the insight Thom, did you know Apple didn't invent the hand either? Not even the hand gesture I'm thinking of right now! ;) They didn't invent the computer, the tablet, the mouse, etc. either, in case anyone out there is wondering.

The BeOS demo is cool too. I don't think the implementation looks that similar to what the touch-based page turning on the iPad looks like, whereas I'd say the Tab/Android version looks remarkably similar to the one on the iPad, from how it curls under your finger to having the back side of the flipped page kind of showing through what's on the front side. And when the guy in the demo touched a book and it zoomed in/open, it looks just like the iBooks book opening animation. I'm not saying Apple came up with zooms animations either, before anyone gets concerned.

To be clear, I'm not arguing for patents on this type of stuff, just saying it's very flattering to Apple to suddenly have everyone working hard to try to make it look and work the same way. Given the interface, hardware, and function being implemented you will end up with similar solutions, but that's just amazing coincidence to happen to have the 'print though' effect and a number of other similarities independently right after your competitor comes out with the apps, particularly given the traditional lack of polish like that from other companies. You'd probably expect different results if asking 2 artists to paint the same landscape too.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Wow!
by StephenBeDoper on Fri 24th Sep 2010 18:41 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Wow!"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

The BeOS demo is cool too. I don't think the implementation looks that similar to what the touch-based page turning on the iPad looks like,


The fundamental concepts are identical - simulation of a page flipping by mapping a 2d surface onto a 3d object.

To be clear, I'm not arguing for patents on this type of stuff, just saying it's very flattering to Apple to suddenly have everyone working hard to try to make it look and work the same way.


True, and by the same token, companies like Calameo and Issuu are probably both flattered that Apple has followed their lead with the iPad's ebook UI.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Wow!
by phoenix on Fri 24th Sep 2010 21:51 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Wow!"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

It's been available for 2 decades already; nothing new.

My sister's storybooks on CD-ROM included page turning animations ... on Windows 3.1, back in the 80s. These were even interactive stories (Mercer Meyer and Berenstein Bears) where you could interact with the characters, not just flip pages.

The fact that people are hung up on page animations just boggles my mind. It's true that those who ignore the past are doomed to repeat it as if it were new. ;)

Reply Score: 3

HP Slate minus Web OS = WHY?!?!?
by runjorel on Thu 23rd Sep 2010 21:20 UTC
runjorel
Member since:
2009-02-09

I wholeheartedly agree that Windows 7 just doesn't work as a touch-based OS. As a tablet OS WITH A STYLUS, it's great. But using your finger? Not so much.

I also really like Android. I recently replaced my Palm Pre with a Galaxy S and so far the experience has been wonderful. But sometimes I will pull out the Pre and play with it and I realize...WebOS just rocks. I really wish that platform matured and more/popular apps were developed for Web OS AND it was installed on faster hardware.

Looking at all these tablet OSs, iOS vs Windows 7 vs Android vs WebOS, I believe WebOS is the one mobile OS at the moment that really is the best for a net-connected touch appliance (because HP is not just thinking about tablets in regards to WebOS). WebOS has the better multitasking aspect (hands-down), development is a lot more focused on web-app development than the other platforms(android=java, iOS=obj. c), AND I think the overall user experience on WebOS is just as good, if not better, than iOS or Android.

Regardless, I am still putting all of my eggs(i.e. saving up those funds) in the hope of a WebOS tablet with good hardware, movie streaming capabilities, and all the other good stuff. Honestly, I don't care if it has feature X that is BETTER than the iPad. As long as it's up to Par, I would gladly take WebOS over iPad or Android.

But, if my WebOS tablet dreams never come true...Android tablet, here I come.

Reply Score: 4

mrstep Member since:
2009-07-18

I'm very interested to see what a Pre tablet looks like as well. I think HP certainly made the right move in picking up webOS in order not to end up being just another Android/WinMo7 hardware vendor, and if they can execute it will be good for everyone. Pre/webOS actually has innovative ideas that don't look like a somewhat less polished Apple knock-off. ;)

Reply Score: 1

ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

Yes, webOS is (still) a great user experience. I hope HP does well with (and by) it.

I'm quite impressed with the MeeGo tablet user experience, though. I especially like the near-endless vertical area (sort of multi-desktop, but without the borders) with quick scrolling on the right, and the app / document quick-scrolling on the left. This makes great use of wide screens, IMHO.

Of course, the remarkable openness is nice, too. :-)

Reply Score: 3

Galaxy Tab looks like the right size
by nt_jerkface on Thu 23rd Sep 2010 21:27 UTC
nt_jerkface
Member since:
2009-08-26

The ipad looks like a novelty ipod touch, I crack up when I see people using it with a serious expression.

I could actually see some current ipad owners switching to the Galaxy just for the Flash.

A lot of smaller news affiliates still use Flash and don't care about Jobs and his little war. People who I have talked to about this think Jobs is insane and don't see what the big deal is.

Reply Score: 4

MissinBeOS Member since:
2006-10-20

Glad you're so easily amused & entertained.

What is it about the iPad that brings out such strongly polarized viewpoints? If you don't like the darned thing, don't buy it. No need to make fun of people who do like it.

Reply Score: 0

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Glad you're so easily amused & entertained.


It's a side benefit from having a sense of humor.


If you don't like the darned thing, don't buy it. No need to make fun of people who do like it.


I find it funny because it looks like a novelty item. Sorry if that gets your panties in a bundle.

Reply Score: 0

Quoteth
by fretinator on Thu 23rd Sep 2010 21:27 UTC
fretinator
Member since:
2005-07-06

Windows Smartphone Embedded Mobile Compact CE PocketPC


Nice!

Reply Score: 5

RE: Quoteth
by flanque on Fri 24th Sep 2010 13:50 UTC in reply to "Quoteth"
flanque Member since:
2005-12-15

Windows Smartphone Embedded Mobile Compact CE PocketPC

Seems Microsoft paid Capcom to come up with that name...

Reply Score: 2

Really?
by TheGZeus on Fri 24th Sep 2010 01:15 UTC
TheGZeus
Member since:
2010-05-19

Windows 7 is the best OS?
I... wow.

Anything I could say would be something you've heard before.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Really?
by Icaria on Fri 24th Sep 2010 06:43 UTC in reply to "Really?"
Icaria Member since:
2010-06-19

And in related news, Ford make the best cars and McDonalds was just awarded a 3rd Michelin Star.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Really?
by Dryhte on Fri 24th Sep 2010 13:53 UTC in reply to "RE: Really?"
Dryhte Member since:
2008-02-05

Nothing wrong with ford ;) cheap and reliable in my experience.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Really?
by nt_jerkface on Fri 24th Sep 2010 14:58 UTC in reply to "RE: Really?"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

That is kind of a lame myth from the 90's.

http://www.thecarconnection.com/marty-blog/1037296_consumer-reports...

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Really?
by Icaria on Fri 24th Sep 2010 15:07 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Really?"
Icaria Member since:
2010-06-19

Right. Two people in a row have now conflated 'best', with 'most reliable'. Oy vey.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Really?
by nt_jerkface on Fri 24th Sep 2010 17:08 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Really?"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

You were playing on a common stereotype, you did not pick Ford for any other reason.

And Big Macs are made to be served in 5 minutes, not win awards.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Really?
by Icaria on Fri 24th Sep 2010 17:42 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Really?"
Icaria Member since:
2010-06-19

You were playing on a common stereotype, you did not pick Ford for any other reason.

Which stereotype would that be again? I can think of many one might associate with Ford: the gas guzzler, the blue collar ute, the superfluous SUV, the 'chick's car' hatchback, the 'bogan's pride' hatchback/sedan...

or maybe, just maybe, I was playing upon the idea of Ford vehicles being generally average, pedestrian, boring, indistinct, plastic and plain old mediocre, for the purposes of making a f--king joke.

Don't mistake your lack of perspective and imagination for some telepathic insight into the mind of someone else. Besides being arrogant, it just makes you look stupid when you inevitably fail to consider a myriad of likely contingencies.

And Big Macs are made to be served in 5 minutes, not win awards


Ooh, you're a sharp one, you are. Ever consider that that was the joke?

Edited 2010-09-24 17:47 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[6]: Really?
by nt_jerkface on Fri 24th Sep 2010 18:13 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Really?"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Yawn.

Of course you didn't mean anything, you were just showing that popularity does not equal quality by example of products that are negatively stereotyped with unrefined mainstream taste. No implications there at all.

Funny how Android is being snapped up by the mainstream but I don't see anyone here questioning its quality based on popularity.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Really?
by TheGZeus on Fri 24th Sep 2010 18:47 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Really?"
TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

You have no sense of humour.

Reply Score: 1

RE[7]: Really?
by Icaria on Fri 24th Sep 2010 22:06 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Really?"
Icaria Member since:
2010-06-19

Yawn.
Oh please, we both know you're not cool; if you were, you wouldn't be here.

Of course you didn't mean anything, you were just showing that popularity does not equal quality by example of products that are negatively stereotyped with unrefined mainstream taste.
No, that wasn't what I was 'showing' at all.

No implications there at all.
Evidentially not, given your continued failure to comprehend a simple facetious point.

Funny how Android is being snapped up by the mainstream but I don't see anyone here questioning its quality based on popularity.
Uh huh... run this by me one more time. You think these premises are the same?
popularity does not equal quality
...
questioning its quality based on popularity

You go from stating that there's no relationship, to stating that there's an inversely proportional one. You go to the trouble of setting up a strawman, then proceed to a non sequitur. No wonder you're having so much trouble: you can't even follow your own bullshit to it's logical conclusion, let alone anyone else's.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Really?
by dagw on Fri 24th Sep 2010 12:44 UTC in reply to "Really?"
dagw Member since:
2005-07-06

For what it's worth, I agree. Windows 7 was the OS that finally made me more or less completely ditch Linux on the desktop.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Really?
by shotsman on Fri 24th Sep 2010 14:17 UTC in reply to "RE: Really?"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

Strange how it was Windows 7 that has made me go the other way. It just kept getting in my way where XP or Server 2003 just didn't. Those builtin group policies that you can't change were the last straw (Well you might but I couldn't be bothered by then to find out how) so I gave it up as a bad job. IMHO, Win 7 is even more 'Broken by Design' than previous versions.

So we've ditch Windows (Apart from one Server 2003 system for support) in my small business. We are a total Linux/Unix/OSX shop now and boy do I feel better for it and not just in the wallet.
Then MS has gone and changd the MSDN licensing as well. I really feel sorry for you MS only guys.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Really?
by dagw on Fri 24th Sep 2010 18:51 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Really?"
dagw Member since:
2005-07-06

Who said I'm MS only? Server side I'm all unix all the time. My phone runs Linux. And I've worked with a couple of embedded projects which where Linux. Basically Linux is great for everything except the desktop.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Really?
by TheGZeus on Fri 24th Sep 2010 16:15 UTC in reply to "RE: Really?"
TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

Well, that could be any number of things, but few of them actually have anything to do with the quality of the underlying OS.
It's more about the applications available for the OS (yes, those are different issues. The Cobra was(and is) an awesome car. There's fsck-all for parts available for it relative to modern ones, but it's a great car).
You can buy a 1990s Taurus and find near-free parts all day (buy another one with a different problem, as they all have one thing or another dying by now). Doesn't make it a great car compared to other cars.
I just thought 'OSnews' should be able to distinguish better...

EDIT: Mismatched parenthesis.

Edited 2010-09-24 16:17 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Really?
by nt_jerkface on Fri 24th Sep 2010 17:46 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Really?"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Well if it was all about application compatibility then he probably would have been using XP.

A lot of users here who have plenty of Linux experience would still rather run Windows or OSX on the desktop even if they only used OpenOffice and a browser.

Maybe you should figure out why that is instead of coming up with smug analogies.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Really?
by TheGZeus on Fri 24th Sep 2010 18:45 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Really?"
TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

Your nickname is appropriate.

Reply Score: 1

Galaxy tab looks cool
by justinamanzer on Fri 24th Sep 2010 08:55 UTC
justinamanzer
Member since:
2007-11-06

The galaxy tab looks very appealing with its bigger form factor and can be used as a phone.

I hope they will be successful in selling that product.

I mean its a phone and a tablet. what else could you ask for you have dell streak for a smaller tablet form factor but a bigger one would be good.

i hope they have a hard shell cover for the galaxy tab and a cool carrying case so that you can protect it when your on the go.

I am really trooling on the galaxy tab demo. just to say the most demeaning thing i could say. sorry.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Galaxy tab looks cool
by justinamanzer on Fri 24th Sep 2010 09:14 UTC in reply to "Galaxy tab looks cool"
justinamanzer Member since:
2007-11-06

Oh BTW this is a nice article. I have not been visiting osnews.com as frequently as I was in the past but its good to see facebook and twitter enhancements are available.

Reply Score: 1

Blank Hardware
by Anonymous Coward on Fri 24th Sep 2010 10:30 UTC
Anonymous Coward
Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm just looking forward to seeing a modern tablet for the DIYer, that I can install my own OS on.

The idea of using MeeGo on a tablet is real nice -

http://www.slashgear.com/meego-tablet-could-be-the-real-deal-019259...

Reply Score: 1

Tony Swash
Member since:
2009-08-22

A hardware button dedicated for Ctrl-Alt-Del!

This thing is a joke.

Adding a skin to Windows 7 won't work.

Microsoft's lingering inability to give up it's Windows Everywhere strategy has killed its ability to compete in the new tech phase.

If you want a touch based tablet that actually works and will sell then you need an OS completely written and designed for touch. This means rethinking much more than just the physical differences between a mouse or finger interaction mechanism.

It goes deeper, it profoundly effects stuff like the whole desktop/folder/file metaphor.

Tablets and touch are new things and we are entering a new era.

Reply Score: 1

ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

A Ctrl-Alt-Del button isn't a bad idea at all (certainly not "a joke"), if you understand hardware. That's called a "Non-Maskable Interrupt" (NMI), and it can't be intercepted or spoofed by non-OS software. Press that button, and the OS-assigned function (typically login / unlock) *will* run.

In an environment where security matters (e.g., "the enterprise"), that's invaluable. My amazement is that every environment isn't treated similarly.

Reply Score: 5

Aragorn992 Member since:
2007-05-27

A Ctrl-Alt-Del button isn't a bad idea at all (certainly not "a joke"), if you understand hardware. That's called a "Non-Maskable Interrupt" (NMI), and it can't be intercepted or spoofed by non-OS software. Press that button, and the OS-assigned function (typically login / unlock) *will* run.

In an environment where security matters (e.g., "the enterprise"), that's invaluable. My amazement is that every environment isn't treated similarly.


If you need a ctrl-alt-del key in the first place then you've failed.

Kind of like how Steve Jobs said you've failed if, when you implementing multitasking (for the iPhone), you need a task manager as well.

I can understand its utility on a machine used by power users doing heavy work but it is particularly unsuitable for a "consumption device" intended for everybody.

Reply Score: 1

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

I can understand its utility on a machine used by power users doing heavy work but it is particularly unsuitable for a "consumption device" intended for everybody.


...which this device isn't.

This is an enterprise device. Domain logons require ctrl+alt+del. This makes PERFECT sense, and is NOTHING to snicker over.

Reply Score: 1

Aragorn992 Member since:
2007-05-27

Why on earth would you use a tablet for the enterprise? I mean, what is the use case here?

Reply Score: 1

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

To show off with a keyboard-less netbook that shines, probably.

Well, that worked with cellphones, so it could work with the netbook...

Reply Score: 2

dante Member since:
2009-08-25

Actually, a good use for it would be one of the things that apple shows in one of their ads - a display for MRI results.

I would expect for a real heathcare place to use that, the device ( not the app ) would have to have a real login and then pull the images from a server.

Reply Score: 1

ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

OK, I get that you know nothing about security, and didn't follow my post at all. What I don't get is why you chose to spout an irrelevant quote by Steve Jobs (on user interfaces of all things), as if that has the slightest relationship to my point.

"Power users" aren't the only users who need security. Those doing "heavy work" are the only users who need security. The prevalence of botnets should make that clear to you; that it doesn't should worry you.

Now, go learn something about security and why it matters. You'll be glad you did.

Reply Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

A hardware button dedicated for Ctrl-Alt-Del!

This thing is a joke.

Well, I'd have loved such a hardware feature on my grandma's eMac running Mac OS 9 ^^ It was not powerful enough to run OSX, and would crash so often than even hitting the keyboard keystroke became cumbersome in the end...

We're both joking about old memories. Modern and mature desktop OSs like Windows 7 and Mac OS X 10.4 are both reliable enough (I'll avoid talking about 10.5+ as far as reliability is concerned). During all that time I've spent handling computers running Win7 RTM and OSX 10.4, I never had to kill a single application using the task manager.

This button is not about killing applications (which is now handled through ctl+shift+esc by the way). It's about switching users, as some pointed out. The ctl+alt+suppr has been turned to a way to do that since the XP pro days...

Adding a skin to Windows 7 won't work.

...however, we agree there. Touch input on windows 7 is a joke. Years of pixel-based button sizing and positioning won't disappear that easily. For a single operating system to work on both touch-based to... content-consumption devices with poor input resolution and desktop computers, it requires deep changes in the GUI toolkit. And microsoft hasn't done those yet, afaik.

Microsoft's lingering inability to give up it's Windows Everywhere strategy has killed its ability to compete in the new tech phase.

I don't agree with that. A single operating system can work on a wide range of platforms. Its APIs just have to be flexible enough. As an example, Linux runs on embedded devices, and it's still the same old Darwin that's at the heart of iOS and OSX with its fellow Cocoa API that has just received a few touch-oriented tweaks.

In fact I think it's possible to make portability work at an even higher level than the kernel and low-level API layers, though proving it (or failing to do so) will take me some time. Flash 10.1 is already an interesting step in that direction, though it's not ready yet.

If you want a touch based tablet that actually works and will sell then you need an OS completely written and designed for touch. This means rethinking much more than just the physical differences between a mouse or finger interaction mechanism.

Again, this is arguable. In my current experience of OS development, it's only at a very high level that the way you interact with the device actually starts to matter. And even at that level, things can go smoothly, provided that the OS was made with all means of interaction in mind. As an example, an OS that has automatic widget resizing and relevant widget deletion when running low on screen size or input resolution could theoretically run both on a desktop PC and a tablet. It would however fail at fully exploiting the capabilities of a 3D interface like those we might see in the future.

It goes deeper, it profoundly effects stuff like the whole desktop/folder/file metaphor.

Not really. In real life, a desktop is a rectangular area where you find stuff that you're working with. You'll find a virtual equivalent of that on Windows, Mac OS, Linux, Android, WebOS, Symbian, and iOS. The sole difference is whether you favor a file-based interface (like the current Mac OS desktop) or an application-based interface (like Windows 3.1 did). In the former, you can access and manage the information stored on your computer in a quicker and easier fashion, which is nice for work and other creative tasks. The latter kind is more useful for leisure tasks like gaming that don't create any kind of useful information.

Tablets and touch are new things and we are entering a new era.

New ? No. They are just a new spawn of consumption-oriented computing, logically following previous work on DAPs, PMPs, video game consoles, and cellphones by trying to unify them all in a single device, just like desktop computers have unified many information-processing tools in a single cheap tool. And contrary to the desktop which opened a full world of opportunities compared with those tools they replace, tablets currently don't improve any of those concepts much, except in the web browsing area.

Wake me up when you see a gaming device with a three-dimensional display or mean of interaction. When you see a PMP which actually makes you *feel* inside the movie you're watching through neural connection. When a phone allows people to meet in a virtual world, feeling like they're actually back together. When people can transmit thoughts reliably over a large distance, or discover what happens exactly in their brains when they dream.

THAT's change. Touch input is just a good-old bidimensional pointer on a bidimensional screen, only one with low input resolution in exchange of the output flexibility needed to make all of that work on a single device. Nothing to get crazy about. I don't see a new era there, just a shiny spawn of our good old consumption society dating back from the opening of the first supermarket back in the middle of the 20th century

Edited 2010-09-24 16:09 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Win7 Tablet + Developers
by brewmastre on Fri 24th Sep 2010 12:07 UTC
brewmastre
Member since:
2006-08-01

I'm one of a handful of weirdos who actually like .NET development so I can possibly see a Win7 powered slate as being a useful machine. Essentially it would be like using a netbook except that I can plug in any keyboard I like (rather than the crappy netbook KB) and can start coding away. When I'm not coding then I can use it for some basic mail and surfing related stuff. It may not have the polish of Android or iOS but I can guarantee the Slate will be more hacker friendly than any other device.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Win7 Tablet + Developers
by chrish on Fri 24th Sep 2010 13:43 UTC in reply to "Win7 Tablet + Developers"
chrish Member since:
2005-07-14

If .NET is the only draw, I'm sure someone will get Mono ported to Android soon enough.

You can use it already on iOS via MonoTouch or Unity.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Win7 Tablet + Developers
by brewmastre on Fri 24th Sep 2010 13:56 UTC in reply to "RE: Win7 Tablet + Developers"
brewmastre Member since:
2006-08-01

Probably so, but not everyone likes Mono or it's development environments. Not to mention that Mono has only really done a good job of implementing C# while others like VB.NET are seriously lacking. The other issue for me is that I like the idea of coding on the same machine that I will run my apps on so unless there will be a native IDE that runs on Android then it will be useless to me. I have been a long time supported of Apple but the concept of needing two separate systems (desktop/laptop + handheld/tablet) for development is entirely too cumbersome and cost prohibitive for me.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Win7 Tablet + Developers
by dante on Sun 26th Sep 2010 14:38 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Win7 Tablet + Developers"
dante Member since:
2009-08-25

The one of the new features of C# is that you don't have to develop with MonoDevelop to run on Mono.

You should really work on not coding on the platform that your apps run on, because compiling/unit testing anything of size on embedded/tablet/new_small_hotness_whatever, will be painful.

I'll avoid saying anything about VB.NET as I don't know anything about it, but I'd say, from a commercial standpoint at least, you don't want Microsoft deciding if you need to totally rewrite your app if you're going to keep selling it in the future.

Reply Score: 1

Another post from OSBlog.com
by polaris20 on Mon 27th Sep 2010 14:08 UTC
polaris20
Member since:
2005-07-06

It's lighter and smaller than the iPad, which I found to be heavy and clunky, its large display necessitating lots of movement of your hands to cover the entire display.

Yeah Thom, it weighs a ton at a pound and a half.

I think the iPad is anything but clunky, and unlike 7" tablets, you can actually type comfortably in portrait mode. 7" will be far too tight for that.

This article is a good indication of why I avoid OSNews these days; it's more blog than news, and generally it's just opinion pieces of why Apple/MS/Google/evil company of the day doesn't make good products in the eyes of the editors.

Reply Score: 2