Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 9th Nov 2010 22:31 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Xfce "This release incorporates major changes to the core of the Xfce desktop environment and hopefully succeeds in fulfilling a number of long time requests. Among the most notable updates is that we have ported the entire Xfce core (Thunar, xfdesktop and thunar-volman in particular) from ThunarVFS to GIO, bringing remote filesystems to the Xfce desktop. The panel has been rewritten from scratch and provides better launcher management and improved multi-head support. The list of new panel features is too long to mention in its entirety here. Thanks to the new menu library garcon (formerly known as libxfce4menu, but rewritten once again) we now support menu editing via a third-party menu editor such as Alacarte (we do not ship our own yet). Our core libraries have been streamlined a bit, a good examplle being the newly introduced libxfce4ui library which is meant to replace libxfcegui4."
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One of the best environments around
by RRockMan on Tue 9th Nov 2010 23:26 UTC
RRockMan
Member since:
2008-11-30

I still haven't tried HaikuOS, but coming from a BeOS experience (and thus searching for the old "truly responsive" Amiga feeling), XFCE is the environment that pleased me the most in the last years.
I will now probably install Linux on my netbook again.
(Being lazy due to my new netbook having Windows 7 pre-installed)

Reply Score: 2

Jason Bourne
Member since:
2007-06-02

What about changing the horrible name and evolve into a strong Unity competitor, also making use of Wayland. Sorry GNOME folks, I just don't see a future for GNOME Shell. I tried it, and it keeps sucking big time. Just like Unity!

Reply Score: 5

stabbyjones Member since:
2008-04-15

I've used Gnome-shell full time for well over a year now and it doesn't suck. Mutter works and looks great and the shell itself is really comfortable to use.

Ever used kickoff or the vista/win7 start menu? That's pretty much gnome-shell. The overlay gives you the added bonus of window/desktop management.

XFCE never stayed on my desktops for long, but I'm more than happy to try it out again especially now they've rewritten the panel which was one of the things I didn't like.

Reply Score: 3

FunkyELF Member since:
2006-07-26

Its open-source.
You could fork for the sole purpose of re-branding.

That would stir up the community.

Reply Score: 2

Jason Bourne Member since:
2007-06-02

Yes, I know it's open-source. And all it takes is Olivier to change a single string, nothing more. I don't feel like forking anything since I don't want to pose any kind of disrespect against the founder. If there's something weird in the open source world is someone taking your code and sabotage it. I hope eventually he wakes up for this. - Right now, I believe it's an incredible right time for "second grade" desktop to emerge between the transitions of GNOME/Unity/Shell.

Reply Score: 3

hussam Member since:
2006-08-17

Yes, I know it's open-source. And all it takes is Olivier to change a single string, nothing more. I don't feel like forking anything since I don't want to pose any kind of disrespect against the founder. If there's something weird in the open source world is someone taking your code and sabotage it. I hope eventually he wakes up for this. - Right now, I believe it's an incredible right time for "second grade" desktop to emerge between the transitions of GNOME/Unity/Shell.

1. I hardly understand why you even mention Unity. It's only a piece of software ONE distribution ships. There are so many other GNOME desktop distributions.

2. Gnome-panel will still be available and is in the process of being ported to gtk+ 3.

3. The "XFCE" branding isn't that bad. People just need to grow up and stop picking on naming.

Reply Score: 2

Jason Bourne Member since:
2007-06-02

1. I mention Unity because we're talking about something that will be shipped as default with Ubuntu, which is the main and most used Linux distribution. Ubuntu is so popular that the complexity of just having it as default is enough to cause changes in the entire desktop ecosystem.

2. GNOME-Panel will be another background force on behalf of GNOME Shell's rejection level. Future statistics will prove this. But Unity alone might be the actual GNOME Shell killer.

3. I think it's bad. The logo is bad. I am grown up. I am just sorry that a very good project is branded wrongly. Look Linux Mint logo for example. I like the design.

Reply Score: 2

hussam Member since:
2006-08-17

1. I mention Unity because we're talking about something that will be shipped as default with Ubuntu, which is the main and most used Linux distribution. Ubuntu is so popular that the complexity of just having it as default is enough to cause changes in the entire desktop ecosystem.

No not really. There are lot more fedora, archlinux and opensuse users.
Also for Ubuntu to actually affect upstream code or default configuration, it would mean they actually have to contribute to upstream which ubuntu has always been against. Ubuntu's policy is "upstream works for us".
Ubuntu can stop existing this second and nothing will change.
Redhat and opensuse can stop existing and no more gcc/glibc/gnome/openoffice/wayland/xorg...

Even with xfce, http://www.xfce.org/download/distros scroll down to Lunar

Edited 2010-11-11 06:27 UTC

Reply Score: 4

vaughancoveny Member since:
2007-12-26

1. I mention Unity because we're talking about something that will be shipped as default with Ubuntu, which is the main and most used Linux distribution. Ubuntu is so popular that the complexity of just having it as default is enough to cause changes in the entire desktop ecosystem.


Let's get some sense of perspective about Ubuntu and Linux' celebrity status here, the Microsoft of the Netscape days in 2006-2010. Canonical and Linus Torvalds might not be anti-trust bastards but even go back to Torvalds comments about MINIX in 1992 and I think the Professor has the pompous edge. But not the popular ideas.

Sure, GNU/Linux introduced UNIX-like software and kernel in a popular manner, that if not user friendly, is collabrative enough to get help where its needed.

But it has outgrown other projects, like *BSD, Solaris, BeOS, SCO(I'm gonna get hate mail) etc., although most of those were from 1991 onward.

Now things like the re-emergence of E-Comstation 2.0, Amiga and MorphOS, or ReactOS aren't getting backstabbed by Ubuntu's popularity. Their servers go with Amazon EC2 cloud, and 10.04 desktop had terrible bugs for an LTS version. Too many changes.

OpenBSD 4.0 had too many changes resulting in the second remote security install bug, although certain people need to run software on the BSDs and their customizations. Its a pity the OliveBSD desktop project for OpenBSD folded a few years ago.

2. GNOME-Panel will be another background force on behalf of GNOME Shell's rejection level.


I love the old GNOME-Panels. But the GNOME shell ruins it if its like a bleeding Start Menu. Enough of the Start Menus!! Kickoff Sh*t!!
TOP Applications/Places/System seperator... Quick Launch sep... you know the rest

BOTTOM

Taskbar sep... Desktops sep... Trashcan [I wonder why
only Ubuntu uses one trashcan in the corner/Nautilus sometimes and doesn't place it on the desktop. At least from 9.10 previous. The one thing Ubuntu did best ;) ]

Reply Score: 1

Barnabyh Member since:
2006-02-06

He probably invented that project when he was about 15. Could polish the logo a bit and deemphasize the mouse rodent, or make it really cute and give it more prominence so the girlies like it ;) .

An call it either Nibbly or Nimble DE or Vista - a desktop wth a view.

Just kidding, it's all fine with me as it is. I mean what could be simpler than XFCE?

Reply Score: 2

Looking forward to it
by Hypnos on Wed 10th Nov 2010 00:37 UTC
Hypnos
Member since:
2008-11-19

I migrated from GNOME to XFCE early this year. While it lacks a bit of polish compared to GNOME, it is far more pleasant to use and maintain: functional, standards compliant, modular. And it's much kinder to my laptop battery.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by zizban
by zizban on Wed 10th Nov 2010 00:44 UTC
zizban
Member since:
2005-07-06

I wish they bring back the feature to allow the panel to be covered by windows. Right now to do that you need to use devilspie, which is not exactly user friendly.

Reply Score: 2

seanpk
Member since:
2009-11-17

I've been using xfce4 as my primary business and development desktop since xubuntu 9.04.
It has been solid, and I've got neither gnome nor kde to work on my thinkpad x61 as well as xfce.
Every new (k)ubuntu release I've tried them out again - I want new features! - but even though xfce has not added flashy features, I just can't be as productive anywhere else (I do use ubuntu gnome at home).

This is going to be so much fun! New features, and still a productive environment.

Reply Score: 3

any screenshots?
by hussam on Wed 10th Nov 2010 01:20 UTC
hussam
Member since:
2006-08-17

pics or it didn't happen!

Reply Score: 2

RE: any screenshots?
by UltraZelda64 on Wed 10th Nov 2010 04:51 UTC in reply to "any screenshots?"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

I would also like to see screens of the new preview release. The project only has the source up for download, which is understandable... but I tried compiling and installing it myself and, as I expected, ended up giving up quick. I always have the worst luck with compiling, so I don't even know why I wasted the time attempting in the first place.

Reply Score: 2

I like the concept behind XFCE
by Toad on Wed 10th Nov 2010 07:43 UTC
Toad
Member since:
2005-11-27

I think both Gnome and KDE are doing too much/bloated, even if I am using mainly Gnome.

Reply Score: 2

RE: I like the concept behind XFCE
by Laurence on Wed 10th Nov 2010 08:38 UTC in reply to "I like the concept behind XFCE"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

I think both Gnome and KDE are doing too much/bloated, even if I am using mainly Gnome.

Well that's the glory of Linux.
If you don't like KDE or GNOME, then there's still a plethora of other DE available to use.

Personally I quite like Xfce.

Reply Score: 2

sj87 Member since:
2007-12-16

What comes to full-blown desktop environments, the options are pretty much down to Gnome, KDE and XFCE. Of course there are window managers and who knows what to choose from aswell.

Reply Score: 2

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

What comes to full-blown desktop environments, the options are pretty much down to Gnome, KDE and XFCE. Of course there are window managers and who knows what to choose from aswell.

I don't think that's entirely fair. There's stacks of DEs that don't get as much limelight, like LXDE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LXDE

And as you said, theres window managers as well - many of which are DEs in themselves: such as Fluxbox.

Heck, if you're not fussed about panels and tray icons, then theres stuff like DWM and it's many forks.

There's also a few UNIX DEs (which I believe are GPL) that dont appear to have been ported to Linux (JDE, Project Looking Glass, etc).

So there is plenty of choice out there.

Edited 2010-11-10 16:21 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Resizing maximized windows?
by sb56637 on Wed 10th Nov 2010 12:18 UTC
sb56637
Member since:
2006-05-11

It's been years since I tried XFCE. Looking interesting this latest release though.

Did they ever fix that feature/bug that allowed maximized windows to be resized? I used to constantly resize my maximize windows with my IBM Thinkpad's mouse nub by going to drag a vertical scrollbar and instead grabbing the window border and skewing it all over my screen. That was my #1 irk with XFCE.

Reply Score: 2