Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 15th Nov 2010 23:25 UTC, submitted by ebasconp
AMD MeeGo! Nokia's hope for the future is developing at a quick pace, and considering the rather lukewarm reception of Nokia's Symbian^3 devices, that quick pace is more than justified. MeeGo got a big boost today with AMD announcing support for the platform. The company puts its money where its mouth is, too.
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AMD fusion APU family of devices
by lemur2 on Tue 16th Nov 2010 00:19 UTC
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

AMD have released programming specifications for most of its family of graphics chips, so that open source developers are able to write Linux drivers for AMD/ATI graphics chipsets.

http://www.x.org/docs/AMD/

AMD have recently announced the AMD Fusion™ Family of APUs.
http://sites.amd.com/us/fusion/apu/Pages/fusion.aspx

AMD have even deomnstrated the first fusion APU chips:
http://www.amd.com/us/press-releases/Pages/amd-demonstrates-2010jun...

In particular, the Falcon APUs seem to be targetted at the low-power segment of the market.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMD_Fusion

Falcon
An option to be implemented into mobile phones, UMPC and small multimedia devices, with the codenamed Bobcat processor core focusing on low power consumption (1 to 10 Watts TDP) computations for handheld devices such as UMPC.


It would seem that this announcement from AMD joining the Meego effort is entirely in line with the Falcon APUs target market.

The only strange thing is that Meego is aimed at netbooks, mids, tablets and handhelds. Intel is involved because most netbooks use Intels Atom CPU in conjunction with Intel's GMA graphics accelerators. AMD's Fusion APUs will probably become a direct challenge to that combination of Intel chipsets within the meego target market.

Intel and AMD both involved in Meego: strange bedfellows it would seem.

Edited 2010-11-16 00:22 UTC

Reply Score: 4

Conference
by vivainio on Tue 16th Nov 2010 01:51 UTC
vivainio
Member since:
2008-12-26

Speaking of meegoconf, if you feel like trolling or biseshedding in person, bring it over. I'm there, still with to hair.

Reply Score: 3

AMD mentions Fusion APUs directly in context
by lemur2 on Tue 16th Nov 2010 01:57 UTC
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

http://blogs.amd.com/press/2010/11/15/amd-joins-meego-linux-open-so...

“MeeGo represents an exciting, open-source mobile operating system we expect to be adopted by mobile and embedded device makers over time,” said Ben Bar-Haim, corporate vice president, software development, AMD. “We are glad to provide engineering resources to joint industry efforts like MeeGo and expect that this operating system will help drive our embedded plans and create expanded market opportunities for our forthcoming Accelerated Processing Units.”


So there you go, a quote from the horses mouth so to speak.

As for competing against Meego partner Intel in the Meego target market, this snippet of information from the same article might explain it:
The MeeGo project is hosted by The Linux Foundation, a non-profit consortium dedicated to fostering the growth of Linux. AMD is currently a gold level member of the Linux Foundation and has a seat on The Linux Foundation’s board of directors.


http://www.linuxfoundation.org/node/5887

Edited 2010-11-16 01:59 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Three Cheers for Everyone Pitching In
by lfeagan on Tue 16th Nov 2010 04:00 UTC
lfeagan
Member since:
2006-04-01

I am so glad to finally see some very serious efforts to push Linux on mobile platforms. Although it would be wonderful if this was pure altruism I think we all know it is not. So long as the market remains competitive and all players still feel as though there is the possibility both to grow if resources are invested and fall behind if they do not continue to invest significantly, we the users should be pretty well set to benefit from some serious innovation. Hopefully the Linux Foundation will carefully cultivate this good fortune and make sure no one player comes to monopolize while all others are marginalized.

Reply Score: 1

miker Member since:
2009-07-08

I am so glad to finally see some very serious efforts to push Linux on mobile platforms.


Android has been on the market for 2 years and in development for more than 5, that doesn't count as pushing Linux on a mobile platforms?

Reply Score: 1

Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

What did Android bring to other linux systems?

Edited 2010-11-16 19:51 UTC

Reply Score: 1

vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

What did Android bring to other linux systems?


"Droid Fonts" seems to be something that can be used outside Android as well.

Reply Score: 2

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

When saying "linux", people generally mean GNU/linux with Xorg and all the stuff.

Reply Score: 2

lfeagan Member since:
2006-04-01

Indeed, as asserted by others, I generally think of Android as a "sort of" linux. While Linux is a kernel. I think of Linux as also including a large ecosystem of tools and infrastructure that make me a happy camper. Personally, I am eagerly awaiting the Nokia N9 with Meego sometime early next year. I am from the SuSE camp and having Zypper for package management is right down my alley.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by Flatland_Spider
by Flatland_Spider on Tue 16th Nov 2010 13:53 UTC
Flatland_Spider
Member since:
2006-09-01

AMD pretty much missed the netbook revolution, doesn't play a role in smartphones, and they're not playing much of a role in the tablet frenzy either.


AMD opted not to play in the netbook arena. AMD has finite resources, when compared to Intel, and they have to pick and choose their battles. At the time, they were hemorrhaging money, integrating ATI, and had a server focused core which was behind the performance of Intel equipment, so it wasn't pressing AMD release an Atom competitor.

The plan was to let the market develop, and then release a chip which was competitive. Even now, netbook, smartphones, and tablets aren't where the money is. AMD needs to play in the arena, but it's not going to be a giant profit center for them. This is evident in the Bobcat chip. The Bobcat chips will be able to be used as a desktop/laptop chip and as a netbook/nettop/tablet chip.

x86 chips are still pretty far away from being used in smartphones. They are too big and too hot right now. In a few years they maybe, but not at the moment.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by Flatland_Spider
by StephenBeDoper on Tue 16th Nov 2010 16:15 UTC in reply to "Comment by Flatland_Spider"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

FWIW, I'm starting to see netbooks for sale with Athlon Neo CPUs.

Reply Score: 2

AMD Already Has Open-Source Fusion Drivers
by lemur2 on Wed 17th Nov 2010 21:42 UTC
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=ODc5Mw

There's good news for those of you wanting to quickly go out and pickup an AMD Fusion system as soon as it's available: there's already open-source drivers for Fusion.

AMD's Alex Deucher has now confirmed that there are open-source graphics drivers for Fusion on Linux already in existence, but they're just waiting for them to be approved for release. Alex (a.k.a. agd5f) mentioned this in our forums. "Open drivers are already written, just waiting for final approval to release."

While it's a bit of a surprise that the open-source drivers are already written and just behind held up by approval (perhaps more legal reviews), it should not come as a complete surprise that AMD has been working on open-source drivers for this CPU+GPU combo architecture.

Reply Score: 2