Linked by HAL2001 on Thu 16th Dec 2010 20:49 UTC
Databases MySQL 5.5 delivers significant enhancements enabling users to improve the performance and scalability of web applications across multiple operating environments, including Windows, Linux, Oracle Solaris, and Mac OS X. The MySQL 5.5 Community Edition, which is licensed under the GNU GPL, and is available for free download, includes InnoDB as the default storage engine.
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Licensing costs?
by tessmonsta on Thu 16th Dec 2010 21:03 UTC
tessmonsta
Member since:
2009-07-16

What happened to the $5000 licensing cost for InnoDB? Was that only for the commercial edition? I thought I read somewhere that it was wasn't going to be available for free...

Reply Score: 1

RE: Licensing costs?
by kaffeenhed on Thu 16th Dec 2010 22:30 UTC in reply to "Licensing costs?"
kaffeenhed Member since:
2010-04-29

What happened to the $5000 licensing cost for InnoDB? Was that only for the commercial edition? I thought I read somewhere that it was wasn't going to be available for free...


As of right now, even the low end commercial editions that start at $2000/year include InnoDB and MyISAM. There's also MySQL Embedded that's targeted at OEM's and ISV's, and that has separate pricing that isn't disclosed on their website. I've never had reason to use anything other than the Community Edition, so I'm not sure what pricing on Embedded looks like.

Edited 2010-12-16 22:30 UTC

Reply Score: 1

nice speed gains
by poundsmack on Thu 16th Dec 2010 21:35 UTC
poundsmack
Member since:
2005-07-13

the speed gains on Windows using multi core chips are pretty substantial. Good job guys!

Reply Score: 2

RE: nice speed gains
by vodoomoth on Fri 17th Dec 2010 16:18 UTC in reply to "nice speed gains"
vodoomoth Member since:
2010-03-30


MySQL Database and InnoDB storage engine have been enhanced to provide optimum performance and scalability when running on the latest multi-CPU and multi-core hardware and operating systems.

I've spent some time in computer science research and that assertion is ... in my book (fill in the blank as you wish, my English is not good enough to have the appropriate word/phrase other than "a lie").

On Windows: Up to 1,500 percent performance gains for Read/Write operations and up to 500 percent gain for Read Only.

Wow, how is that even possible? 1500 percent gains means 15 or 16 times the time needed for the same RW operations... which seems very strange to me. Either 5.1 was purposely badly coded or numbers are inflated or they've done some incredibly awesome engineering work. In which case, they should pass the appropriate info to Microsoft to make the future Windows OSes faster than they would have been.

Anyway, it's good that Oracle didn't kill MySQL.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: nice speed gains
by nt_jerkface on Fri 17th Dec 2010 20:44 UTC in reply to "RE: nice speed gains"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

which seems very strange to me. Either 5.1 was purposely badly coded or numbers are inflated or they've done some incredibly awesome engineering work.


MySQL has long been optimized for Nix based systems.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: nice speed gains
by wlad on Sat 18th Dec 2010 17:23 UTC in reply to "RE: nice speed gains"
wlad Member since:
2010-12-18

<Wow, how is that even possible
It is possible by eliminating context switches and kernel transitions. As for the numbers, do not forget this benchmark (sysbench) does not resemble reality in anyway, it is just hammering server with similar queries from 256 clients.

To tell the truth, this was an easy one, and the one that should have been done years ago. What brought the main speed gain inside Innodb, was replacing OS mutex (the slow one, used to synchronize between processes) with CRITICAL_SECTION. That would have worked even on Win95. The fact it was still inside is quite embarassing (it shows basically that this thing was not profiled since Heikki has written it in the mid 90ties) . The rest of Windows adjustments were switching to Vista conditions (for Innodb's os_event) and rwlocks (not innodb , this is inside the core server), when possible. Compliment to Windows division at Microsoft, those new synchronization primitives are extremely well tuned.

Reply Score: 1

Bench
by vivainio on Thu 16th Dec 2010 21:48 UTC
vivainio
Member since:
2008-12-26

Thank you, Oracle, for this fine database! Nice to see it's not dead yet.

Reply Score: 3

Comment by diego
by diegoviola on Tue 21st Dec 2010 22:20 UTC
diegoviola
Member since:
2006-08-15

PostgreSQL is better.

Reply Score: 2