Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 10th Jan 2011 22:59 UTC
Mac OS X Now that the Mac App Store has been snuck installed onto your machine alongside Mac OS X 10.6.6, you might be wondering - is there some way to remove that monstrosity of an application from my Mac? While it's not officially supported, it does seem like Apple has taken this scenario into account.
Order by: Score:
Comment by ssokolow
by ssokolow on Mon 10th Jan 2011 23:32 UTC
ssokolow
Member since:
2010-01-21

Well, Apple got one thing right. (Actually having the "find something to open this" implemented in a way that has at least some chance of working without being a 3rd-party website unknown to the users who need it)

Ubuntu already suggests installable packages if you type an unrecognized command. (I think it's a Debian feature they inherited but I'm not certain)

It shouldn't be too hard for someone already familiar with the system and the social environment of the Debian project to extend APT to index MimeType lines in .desktop files and extension<->mimetype associations in whatever files hold those so a desktop association or patch can suggest installable handlers when you double-click an unrecognized file type.

Of course, on the other hand, "unrecognized" is a much smaller category on Linux, given that, if you don't have extension-based handlers installed, most filetypes get picked up as Zip or GZip or XML or plaintext by the header check.

Edited 2011-01-10 23:38 UTC

Reply Score: 1

Sure, title bar is odd,
by MacMan on Tue 11th Jan 2011 00:26 UTC
MacMan
Member since:
2006-11-19

But honestly Thom, I think "monstrosity" goes just a little bit too far.

I guess you've never tried to use either A: Matlab on any platform, or B: any QT application on OSX.

But I guess we can't touch this sacred cow QT around here, the moment I say anything the slightest bit negative about QT, I get modded down.

Reply Score: 7

v RE: Sure, title bar is odd,
by tyrione on Tue 11th Jan 2011 01:05 UTC in reply to "Sure, title bar is odd,"
RE: Sure, title bar is odd,
by dacresni on Tue 11th Jan 2011 01:32 UTC in reply to "Sure, title bar is odd,"
dacresni Member since:
2009-08-26

hey, QT doesn't break as many rules as this app does. QT doesnt center the window buttons!

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: Sure, title bar is odd,
by atsureki on Tue 11th Jan 2011 15:07 UTC in reply to "RE: Sure, title bar is odd,"
atsureki Member since:
2006-03-12

hey, QT doesn't break as many rules as this app does. QT doesnt center the window buttons!


And what exactly is wrong with centering the window controls, especially on a Mac where they're never going to be stuck to a screen corner? I know they control the window itself rather than program functions, so they shouldn't be confusable with action buttons, but looking completely different, being a matched set, having their color set system-wide, and reserving the leftmost area should be enough to accomplish that.

And as for the other most common complaint - that back/forward match the title bar's color - again, what's actually wrong with that? The App Store is a prepared content showcase, much like a physical Apple Store, and making the app itself look boring (like an all-white room) is an effective way to put emphasis on the items on display.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Sure, title bar is odd,
by ebasconp on Tue 11th Jan 2011 02:48 UTC in reply to "Sure, title bar is odd,"
ebasconp Member since:
2006-05-09

If your application looks ugly using Qt... it is not Qt's fault.... Qt uses Cocoa as backend when running in the Mac. As far as I know, Skype uses Qt on the Mac and it is a very nice application.

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: Sure, title bar is odd,
by darknexus on Tue 11th Jan 2011 03:24 UTC in reply to "RE: Sure, title bar is odd,"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

If your application looks ugly using Qt... it is not Qt's fault.... Qt uses Cocoa as backend when running in the Mac. As far as I know, Skype uses Qt on the Mac and it is a very nice application.


I haven't owned a Mac for a couple months now, but when last I used it Skype for the Mac wasn't a QT application. Other than the mobile versions, it was the only one that hadn't become QT-based yet. Has this changed recently?
As for QT using Cocoa, perhaps that's true of later versions of QT, but there are a lot of early QT4 apps and all of the QT3 ones that sure as hell didn't use Cocoa as their backend. They didn't act like Cocoa apps at all other than having the global menubar and basic window management. If QT actually uses Cocoa controls for its widgets now when possible, that's a welcome change indeed.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Sure, title bar is odd,
by MacMan on Tue 11th Jan 2011 13:44 UTC in reply to "RE: Sure, title bar is odd,"
MacMan Member since:
2006-11-19

Qt uses Cocoa as backend when running in the Mac. As far as I know, Skype uses Qt on the Mac and it is a very nice application.


Wrong!


A: The Skype UI is absolutely 100% pure native Cocoa, there is NO QT on Skype for Mac (source, have a friend who works there)

B: QT technically only uses Cocoa to create a raw empty window. After that, it does all of its own event handling, drawing, etc. QT uses Cocoa almost exactly like opening a raw X11 drawable. (source, looked at the QT source code)

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Sure, title bar is odd,
by ebasconp on Tue 11th Jan 2011 16:45 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Sure, title bar is odd,"
ebasconp Member since:
2006-05-09


Wrong!
A: The Skype UI is absolutely 100% pure native Cocoa, there is NO QT on Skype for Mac (source, have a friend who works there)


Ok, I read that somewhere some time ago, but I could not assert that and I think your source is more valid than mine. ;)


B: QT technically only uses Cocoa to create a raw empty window. After that, it does all of its own event handling, drawing, etc. QT uses Cocoa almost exactly like opening a raw X11 drawable. (source, looked at the QT source code)


In this link:

http://doc.trolltech.com/4.6.2/qtmac-as-native.html

They say that they use the HIThemes API provided by Cocoa to render their widgets instead of using their own renderers.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Sure, title bar is odd,
by Skai on Tue 11th Jan 2011 09:19 UTC in reply to "Sure, title bar is odd,"
Skai Member since:
2010-08-19

As a fellow QT hater, I get your point :-)

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Sure, title bar is odd,
by MacMan on Tue 11th Jan 2011 15:00 UTC in reply to "RE: Sure, title bar is odd,"
MacMan Member since:
2006-11-19

As a fellow QT hater, I get your point :-)


Thats pretty heretical language around here. Such forbidden thoughts are liable to get one burned at the stake.

Seems like the OSNews doctrine is:
1: Apple is evil, every comment should be directed towards taking the piss out of Apple. Steve Jobs is the Devil.

2: Its sometimes OK to to say negative things about Microsoft, but never in the same context as Apple. Specifically, is encouraged to say negative things about .net, as saying anything positive about .net would imply that QT is not perfect.

3: QT shall be revered above all else. QT is the alpha and the omega.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Sure, title bar is odd,
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 11th Jan 2011 15:09 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Sure, title bar is odd,"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Seems like the OSNews doctrine is:


OSNews' doctrine is what you make it to be.


http://www.osnews.com/submit

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Sure, title bar is odd,
by ebasconp on Tue 11th Jan 2011 17:20 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Sure, title bar is odd,"
ebasconp Member since:
2006-05-09

3: Qt shall be revered above all else. QT is the alpha and the omega.


You are completely right here, Qt is the alpha and the omega ;)

Reply Score: 2

Snuck?
by binarycrusader on Tue 11th Jan 2011 00:31 UTC
binarycrusader
Member since:
2005-07-06

"Snuck", Thom, really? Other than the fact that it point blank tells you it's being added as part of the 10.6.6 update?

"forced upon" perhaps; but there's no sneaking -- Apple practically trumpeted it from the rooftops that 10.6.6 includes the Mac App Store.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Snuck?
by AmigaRobbo on Tue 11th Jan 2011 19:39 UTC in reply to "Snuck?"
AmigaRobbo Member since:
2005-11-15

It may tell you, but what if you want the security parts of the update without this excuse of a program for Apple to sell you things?

Reply Score: 2

I don't think it's ugly...
by thavith_osn on Tue 11th Jan 2011 00:36 UTC
thavith_osn
Member since:
2005-07-11

...but it's not beautiful either, it's just an App.

If the App Store ran slowly, then that would be a different story.

The store allows you to install apps with no need to worry about serial keys, migration to other Macs you might have, the install process, upgrades and so on. What more could you want? (You know MS are hard at work trying do the same thing - I hope so anyway).

If you want to see ugly, run a lot of Java Apps on the Mac, esp. those ported from other platforms.

I think the UI works quite well and is obviously designed to be kept to a minimum. As for consistency, if I remember correctly, the Mac App Store is designed with 10.7 in mind, so if anything, you will have a taste of what is to come now (just like FaceTime)

The only concern I have is if this will become the *ONLY* way to install apps onto a Mac but to be honest, I'm not too worried about that.

Reply Score: 3

RE: I don't think it's ugly...
by TheGZeus on Tue 11th Jan 2011 02:35 UTC in reply to "I don't think it's ugly..."
TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

Your English has been poisoned.

"Application", "program", or "even operating system 'feature'" are all valid.
'App' is slang/jargon for things installed via an "App store".

The antidote is well known, but seems to be rarely used by those with this variety of diction-poisoning: a dictionary.

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: I don't think it's ugly...
by aliquis on Tue 11th Jan 2011 07:20 UTC in reply to "RE: I don't think it's ugly..."
aliquis Member since:
2005-07-23

"Application", "program", or "even operating system 'feature'" are all valid.
'App' is slang/jargon for things installed via an "App store".
a dictionary.
Thanks for defining how everyone else should use their language oh great one.

Personally I do understand that "app" mean "application" which would also be the equivalent of program.

And regarding the dictionary it's most likely outdated and don't contain the word app .. So there you go ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: I don't think it's ugly...
by jal_ on Tue 11th Jan 2011 09:11 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: I don't think it's ugly..."
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

Personally I do understand that "app" mean "application" which would also be the equivalent of program.


Yeah, but the other way around is confusing. Recently a news site announced that a certain hospital had developed an application, and it took a while before I realized they had created an app.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: I don't think it's ugly...
by aliquis on Tue 11th Jan 2011 09:18 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: I don't think it's ugly..."
aliquis Member since:
2005-07-23

But they are the same? So why do you find it confusing?

It's not advanced enough applications for you?

Only applications written in C and assembler counts, everything else is "scripts"? ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: I don't think it's ugly...
by jal_ on Tue 11th Jan 2011 10:30 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: I don't think it's ugly..."
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

But they are the same? So why do you find it confusing?


They are the same technically, but not functionally. If a hospital developes an application, that's meant for internal use, to aid hospital personal, or at most to interface with the "customers" via a webportal. If a hospital develops an app, that's for use by "customers" for their personal use (but with functionality linked to the hospital's function). That's a whole world of difference.

Reply Score: 0

BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

Splitting some hairs there, don't ya think? If I write a program, It can be called a program, an application, an app, a proggy, or whatever. It's still just a bit of executable code that runs when called.

Reply Score: 5

RE[7]: I don't think it's ugly...
by jal_ on Tue 11th Jan 2011 15:29 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: I don't think it's ugly..."
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

Again, that's from a technical point of view. I was arguing from a functional point of view, from which the difference between an app and a "normal" application is as huge as between post-it and a novel.

Reply Score: 2

TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

That's... not what those words mean.

You've come to think of it that way, but those definitions have no relation to the reality of their origins or uses.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: I don't think it's ugly...
by jal_ on Wed 12th Jan 2011 08:29 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: I don't think it's ugly..."
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

those definitions have no relation to the reality of their origins or uses.


Let's not start a linguistic war here, shall we? To the general public, "app" means something different than "computer program", and why shouldn't it?

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: I don't think it's ugly...
by aliquis on Wed 12th Jan 2011 03:37 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: I don't think it's ugly..."
aliquis Member since:
2005-07-23

Why does it mean that? Why can't a hospital develop one for their patients / anyone?

Which kinda is what they did, if you found it confusing be cause it wasn't internal ;)

Reply Score: 2

TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

I'd quote Louis CK here, but it would probably get me banned.
So I'll just shorten it to "Shut up", as your post amounts to "NYEH!!"


"App" isn't in the dictionary, because it isn't a word.
It's slang, jargon, gibber-jabber, marketing, brainwashing...

Edited 2011-01-11 16:19 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: I don't think it's ugly...
by jal_ on Wed 12th Jan 2011 08:31 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: I don't think it's ugly..."
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

"App" isn't in the dictionary, because it isn't a word.


That sentence alone more or less disqualifies you from this discussion, doesn't it?

Reply Score: 2

TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

It's an abbreviation, not a word.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: I don't think it's ugly...
by jal_ on Wed 12th Jan 2011 16:49 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: I don't think it's ugly..."
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

Sigh. Sure. Abbreviations aren't words. You have no clue what the term "word" means, do you?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: I don't think it's ugly...
by tryfan on Tue 11th Jan 2011 10:07 UTC in reply to "RE: I don't think it's ugly..."
tryfan Member since:
2006-12-16

"App, as a short form for "application", has been used since dinosaurs roamed the computer.
Visicalc and Lotus 1-2-3 were often called the first "killer apps" for MS-DOS, and ever since Linux appeared on the desktop people have been complaining about the lack of "killer apps".
The only thing it has to do with "app store" is that the a-s is a method for distributing app(lication)s.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: I don't think it's ugly...
by jal_ on Tue 11th Jan 2011 15:31 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: I don't think it's ugly..."
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

True the word wasn't coined by Apple. But apart from "killer apps", which is imho more of an idiom, it wasn't used much, while nowadays the mainstream audience (and that's probably not you, OSnews readers) recognizes it as specifically referring to a small application for a smartphone or other mobile device.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: I don't think it's ugly...
by aliquis on Wed 12th Jan 2011 03:43 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: I don't think it's ugly..."
aliquis Member since:
2005-07-23

while nowadays the mainstream audience (and that's probably not you, OSnews readers) recognizes it as specifically referring to a small application for a smartphone or other mobile device.
Idiots who don't understand that applications and programs is the same as programs and applications may think so. And so do you.

An iPhone app is an iPhone program. End of story.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: I don't think it's ugly...
by jal_ on Wed 12th Jan 2011 08:27 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: I don't think it's ugly..."
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

Idiots who don't understand that applications and programs is the same as programs and applications may think so.


You are referring to the majority of people as "idiots". It's clear where you're coming from.

Reply Score: 2

TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

You are not in the majority, thankfully.

Most people know it's jargon/slang/abbreviation.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: I don't think it's ugly...
by jal_ on Wed 12th Jan 2011 16:48 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: I don't think it's ugly..."
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

It is not jargon or slang, as it is the official name used by Apple, and so mainstream that Microsoft appearently wants to use the name "AppStore" as well. And yes, of course it is an abbreviation. But that doesn't mean that it is semantically equal to the full word.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: I don't think it's ugly...
by aliquis on Fri 14th Jan 2011 05:04 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: I don't think it's ugly..."
aliquis Member since:
2005-07-23

You are referring to the majority of people as "idiots". It's clear where you're coming from.
I hope so. Anything else would be pretty sad ;)

Reply Score: 2

TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

Slang.
Jargon.
Abbreviation.

Reply Score: 2

Hmmm...
by Adam S on Tue 11th Jan 2011 00:59 UTC
Adam S
Member since:
2005-04-01

This is a bit like removing Windows Update from Windows. I just don't see how recovering 15MB makes a difference.

I don't think of iTunes as a music player and App Store as an inconvenience. I think of them as core pieces of OS X. Maybe I'm wrong, but I think removing them is really asking for a problem somewhere down the line.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Hmmm...
by Karitku on Tue 11th Jan 2011 08:42 UTC in reply to "Hmmm..."
Karitku Member since:
2006-01-12

You got it wrong! It's about freedom to remove everything. I bought it, it's my product, I can do whatever I want. Reason why Linux is so Awesome is because I can remove kernel and stuff, That's the Power of Open Source! Apples evil businessmen are trying to force us use all kind stuff, but choosing Linux I can do whatever I want because Linux is so Awesome.

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: Hmmm...
by BluenoseJake on Tue 11th Jan 2011 12:20 UTC in reply to "RE: Hmmm..."
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

Try removing your kernel and see how far you get....

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Hmmm...
by leech on Tue 11th Jan 2011 15:13 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Hmmm..."
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

I remove kernels all the time.

Granted they are the older kernel, after an update has installed a new kernel. You test the new kernel, and if everything is okay, then you remove the old kernel to keep the bootloader clean.

The fact that you can tweak and test kernels in this way is awesome, and yes, Linux is Awesome.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Hmmm...
by Soulbender on Tue 11th Jan 2011 15:35 UTC in reply to "RE: Hmmm..."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I think you're trying to be sarcastic but I can't really tell.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by t3RRa
by t3RRa on Tue 11th Jan 2011 03:11 UTC
t3RRa
Member since:
2005-11-22

App Store itself consumes 7.4MB !! on my MBP. So... how much have you cleaned up your Mac by ditching App Store?

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by t3RRa
by righard on Tue 11th Jan 2011 08:34 UTC in reply to "Comment by t3RRa"
righard Member since:
2007-12-26

All the dust in my house also does not take more space than around 5 square cm. I still want it gone though.

Reply Score: 5

Take it down a few
by lezerno on Tue 11th Jan 2011 03:11 UTC
lezerno
Member since:
2009-09-02

Thom,
After the weekend, Americans are all trying to take the hate speech down a few notches. The information presented didn't have to be so over the top.

It is useful advise on how to remove the applications but it didn't seem that difficult to do, so why so much drama?

Reply Score: 0

v RE: Take it down a few
by t3RRa on Tue 11th Jan 2011 03:28 UTC in reply to "Take it down a few"
RE: Take it down a few
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 11th Jan 2011 07:24 UTC in reply to "Take it down a few"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

I'm talking about ones and zeros, not people. Comparing them seems rather tasteless.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Take it down a few
by lezerno on Tue 11th Jan 2011 07:27 UTC in reply to "RE: Take it down a few"
lezerno Member since:
2009-09-02

Okay

You are right.

Peace

Reply Score: 1

Comment by Zaitch
by Zaitch on Tue 11th Jan 2011 08:59 UTC
Zaitch
Member since:
2007-11-23

I wanted to hate the App Store (probably been reading this site too much... ;) but honestly... I mean, a few icons have moved position, big deal. It does what it sets out to do, if it offends your eyes remove it from the dock.

I browsed about and found 2 new (free) apps I was interested in and I installed them with no drama, and pleased I did. I'm on the verge of laying out money for a 3rd I discovered that otherwise would have gone unnoticed to me. So the developer is a winner too.

I agree if you don't want it, you should be able to uninstall in an easier fashion than perhaps currently, but apple/macos is by no means the worst OS in this regard.

I'm a command line junkie for the majority of my work and home computing on linux and mac. However I'm more than happy to use anything that makes life simple and easy. app store fits that model.

Reply Score: 2

Unbelievable! You can actually remove it?!
by usr0 on Tue 11th Jan 2011 09:40 UTC
usr0
Member since:
2006-10-27

And why shouldn't you? App Store is just an app like every other app. Cmd + Backslash and it's gone in less than a second (don't try it with Linux/Windows). After all it's not Windows where you have to hack the registry to get rid of MS specific apps. Also it doesn't affect the Mac performance in any way or annoys you with prompts and there are no background tasks running (maybe except the "check for updates" task).

Reply Score: 2

No problem with Linux ...
by pica on Tue 11th Jan 2011 14:11 UTC in reply to "Unbelievable! You can actually remove it?!"
pica Member since:
2005-07-10

<kidding>The Linux kernel like the XNU kernel does not even know about icons. Thus you have no need to remove them.</kidding>

Using the Gnome Desktop you simply move icons into the paper basket to remove them. No cyptic key combination is needed to perform this task.

pica

Reply Score: 1

RE: No problem with Linux ...
by usr0 on Tue 11th Jan 2011 14:53 UTC in reply to "No problem with Linux ..."
usr0 Member since:
2006-10-27

Didn't get it.

Those "icons" on Mac are actually directories -- UNLIKE on Windows, GNOME or KDE. You can see it, if you execute a "ll /Applications" and see that every "icon" has an ".app" suffix which classifies an app directory with an app-specific directory structure.

...of course you can move those "icons" to the trash bin as well.

Edited 2011-01-11 14:56 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: No problem with Linux ...
by btrimby on Tue 11th Jan 2011 14:55 UTC in reply to "No problem with Linux ..."
btrimby Member since:
2009-09-30

I'm not sure if you're trolling or not...

Anyway, Here's how I "got rid of*" the App Store after browsing it a few times.

1. Click-hold on the App Store icon that was deposited on my dock.
2. Drag it up until it turned into a little "paper ball"/"poof"
3. Let go.

* Obviously I didn't really remove it from my system, but if I did want to, I could drag it from the applications folder to the trash, and not need a keyboard shortcut. Though Thom's way is more thorough, I find it's easier to just get it out of my way.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: No problem with Linux ...
by pica on Tue 11th Jan 2011 15:45 UTC in reply to "RE: No problem with Linux ..."
pica Member since:
2005-07-10

Yes, explicitly dragging an application from the application directory into the bin is the way to go. And should IMHO be the only way to do it.

I have a friend using OS X since 10.3 and he often has the problem of suddenly vanishing applications. But the way he is using his computer is quite "unique". He clicks on everything that moves or opens. This sometimes yields into unwanted results.

Maybe, he better should get a system from Sirius Cybernetics Corporation ;-)

Because, for him, I am a computer expert per se, he thinks it is my duty to reinstall these applications. At the moment this is my only relation to OS X.

pica

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: No problem with Linux ...
by usr0 on Thu 13th Jan 2011 10:02 UTC in reply to "RE: No problem with Linux ..."
usr0 Member since:
2006-10-27

So you can remove only the shortcut (of any app) but not the actual app.

Reply Score: 1

Much ado about nothing
by wocowboy on Tue 11th Jan 2011 11:59 UTC
wocowboy
Member since:
2006-06-01

I read the original article the other day, the entire time just amazed at how people can get completely upset about the tiniest little thing. The App Store is FAR from being the worst piece of software I have ever seen, either functionally or aesthetically. And it works quite well, as I am quite familiar with its processes after having used iTunes and the App Store on my iPad/iPhone, with which I am also quite pleased and use them every day.

And so, in MY opinion, which in reality is no less and no more valid than Thom's, I must conclude that the subject of this original post is based solely on one person's opinion of the aesthetics of an application, not the functionality. App Store is NOT the only method to install software on one's Mac, so if you don't like it, don't use it. It doesn't take up enough space on today's terabyte hard drives to even be noticeable. Remove the icon from your Dock that you find so objectionable also based on past posts and move on.....please!

Reply Score: 2

RE: Much ado about nothing
by vodoomoth on Wed 12th Jan 2011 11:09 UTC in reply to "Much ado about nothing"
vodoomoth Member since:
2010-03-30


It doesn't take up enough space on today's terabyte hard drives to even be noticeable.

Except that Thom has already stated here that he owns a MacBook Air with a small capacity. In an era where 2TB discs are common, having a 64GB ssd justifies that "search for space"... I think.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Much ado about nothing
by Neolander on Thu 13th Jan 2011 13:16 UTC in reply to "RE: Much ado about nothing"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Except that Thom has already stated here that he owns a MacBook Air with a small capacity. In an era where 2TB discs are common, having a 64GB ssd justifies that "search for space"... I think.

It depends what he does with it. When I was not playing a lot of recent games nor storing large amounts of videos on my computer, its 60GB were more than enough. In fact, I had two OSs installed with 30 GB for each.

On the other hand, now that Windows and OSX alone take more than 12 GB, when you add up a reasonably big music library (~10GB) and some large third-party applications... 30GB are certainly not enough anymore. So I wonder if for someone who crunches more disk space than me, 64 can be considered enough.

Reply Score: 1

You obviously can do it, but ...
by pica on Tue 11th Jan 2011 13:54 UTC
pica
Member since:
2005-07-10

are you also allowed to do it. I do not know the end user licence agreement coming along with OS X 10.6.6. What does it say?

For example if you are registered as an Oracle developer, you may download an 11g database. You are also allowed to use this database for development and testing purposes. But you are not allowed -- even though it is technically possible -- to use it in production.

pica

Reply Score: 1

Monstrosity?
by Sabon on Tue 11th Jan 2011 20:36 UTC
Sabon
Member since:
2005-07-06

The only monstrosity is how OS/News is going down hill.

Thom was proven wrong even before he thought up this article. How many apps have been downloaded on iDevices? The MacStore is going to be just as popular percentage wise (taking into account the number of devices for each platform).

If you don't want it, drag it off the Dock by holding your mouse button down and dragging it up and then let go. My guess, even if you don't want to admit it, is that you'll be using the MacStore to get applications. Maybe not this week or next month but with a couple or a few months you will start getting more and more of your applications off the MacStore.

How about some real articles.

Edited 2011-01-11 20:37 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: Monstrosity?
by TheGZeus on Tue 11th Jan 2011 20:45 UTC in reply to "Monstrosity? "
TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

So it's popular.
Bush was voted into office at least once.

Popular != good.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Monstrosity?
by Neolander on Tue 11th Jan 2011 21:37 UTC in reply to "Monstrosity? "
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

My guess, even if you don't want to admit it, is that you'll be using the MacStore to get applications. Maybe not this week or next month but with a couple or a few months you will start getting more and more of your applications off the MacStore.

Sounds like a frightening perspective, the way you say it ;)

"We haf vayz of making you use Mac Store !"

Edited 2011-01-11 21:41 UTC

Reply Score: 1

Thom...WTF?
by SamWoodwardUS on Tue 11th Jan 2011 23:51 UTC
SamWoodwardUS
Member since:
2010-12-01

Ok, last time I commented it was over Thom's political rantings. Gave OSNews a break. Come back and find this. My god, if Thom hates so much about his Mac why the heck is he using one? Sure, Apple does things that I don't always approve of, and the UI of the App Store is pretty bad. But the utter disdain in his article makes me feel like he'd be better off not using a Mac, or at the very least stop writing about them.

I miss the early days of OSNews. Quality reporting and journalism.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Thom...WTF?
by aesiamun on Wed 12th Jan 2011 03:24 UTC in reply to "Thom...WTF?"
aesiamun Member since:
2005-06-29

Because up until the Mac App Store, Apple only had their iOS devices to dictate. The concern I have is if developers make enough money selling applications with this distribution method, eventually this will be the default way of buying all OS X software.

I do not want this to be the only way to buy applications in the future...I want a choice of where I buy things.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Thom...WTF?
by SamWoodwardUS on Wed 12th Jan 2011 15:01 UTC in reply to "RE: Thom...WTF?"
SamWoodwardUS Member since:
2010-12-01

Because up until the Mac App Store, Apple only had their iOS devices to dictate. The concern I have is if developers make enough money selling applications with this distribution method, eventually this will be the default way of buying all OS X software.

I do not want this to be the only way to buy applications in the future...I want a choice of where I buy things.


I could not agree more, if that happens then I will be looking elsewhere. But that's not something Thom addressed in his rant...

Reply Score: 1

New Era Hats
by leiqiong on Fri 14th Jan 2011 06:22 UTC
leiqiong
Member since:
2011-01-14

That is an awfully astounding column you've posted.Thanks a lot for that a fantastically amazing post!
http://www.caphatshop.com"title="New New Era Hats

Reply Score: 1

Opensource APP store
by bugjacobs on Fri 14th Jan 2011 19:39 UTC
bugjacobs
Member since:
2009-01-03

There should be an opensource "appstore" on the Mac OS X ! With a proper verificationprocess of the content. Like Bodega etc..

Reply Score: 1

RE: Opensource APP store
by TheGZeus on Sat 15th Jan 2011 15:21 UTC in reply to "Opensource APP store"
TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

Fink, MacPorts.

Reply Score: 2