Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Tue 1st Mar 2011 17:01 UTC, submitted by Petur
General Unix "The proc filesystem is a special filesystem found on most UNIX-based systems. It holds a great deal of information, in ASCII format, most of which is not very friendly to the average user. [...] I've made a list of some of the files i find to be of most use."
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Nice Link
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Tue 1st Mar 2011 19:13 UTC
Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

Not much to add to the story, just some positive, constructive feedback.

I really like these more technical stories that you've been linking. Its a nice break from the Piracy/Mobile device business stories. Not that those are ill placed, but I enjoy the technical stories more. While Linux is hardly a new operating system, its nice to examine interesting parts of it now and then.

Reply Score: 7

Compared to where it was copied from
by ronaldst on Tue 1st Mar 2011 21:37 UTC
ronaldst
Member since:
2005-06-29

http://man.cat-v.org/plan_9/3/proc

Except the Plan9 implementation is more flexible and extensive being a distributed OS from the start and having /proc in each namespace (not just the global namespace like Linux/BSD).

Reply Score: 2

demetrioussharpe Member since:
2009-01-09

http://man.cat-v.org/plan_9/3/proc

Except the Plan9 implementation is more flexible and extensive being a distributed OS from the start and having /proc in each namespace (not just the global namespace like Linux/BSD).


So true. One of the things that I hate about the OS community is that sometimes the original source of components get forgotten. It probably would've been even better to have read an article that was mainly about /proc in Plan9. I've always considered it a shame that Plan9 didn't take off the way that some of these other OSes did & now they're leaching off of Plan9's innovations.

Reply Score: 2

Flatland_Spider Member since:
2006-09-01

Interesting. I really need to try Plan9 one of these days. It has very interesting ideas about how an OS should interact with the network.

What are your thoughts on FreeBSD deprecating /proc because it's a security risk?

Reply Score: 1

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

What are your thoughts on FreeBSD deprecating /proc because it's a security risk?

I'm going to be accused of trolling for that, but...

"Ah, too bad they just removed one of the few well-organized parts of the standard UNIX filesystem... Why didn't they just remove the /usr and /opt mess instead, logically putting things in /bin, /lib and so on ? It would have made things must cleaner, and users who are not confused are better for security."

Reply Score: 2

ronaldst Member since:
2005-06-29

I'm going to be accused of trolling for that, but...

"Ah, too bad they just removed one of the few well-organized parts of the standard UNIX filesystem... Why didn't they just remove the /usr and /opt mess instead, logically putting things in /bin, /lib and so on ? It would have made things must cleaner, and users who are not confused are better for security."

sysctl does almost the same thing. And probably predates procfs. I guess that the BSDs tend to stay closer to the gold standard (UNIX) as much as possible so it was a natural choice to stay with sysctl.

So in a way it's not worth it dealing with security issues from duplicate functionality. IMO it shouldn't be a big loss.

Edited 2011-03-02 06:37 UTC

Reply Score: 4

Going away....
by Milo_Hoffman on Wed 2nd Mar 2011 19:26 UTC
Milo_Hoffman
Member since:
2005-07-06

Isn't /proc going away?

I think its deprecated in favor of /sys now and will be going away in the future.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Going away....
by Lazarus on Wed 2nd Mar 2011 21:59 UTC in reply to "Going away...."
Lazarus Member since:
2005-08-10

Isn't /proc going away?

I think its deprecated in favor of /sys now and will be going away in the future.


The Linux /proc is not going away, what is slowly happening is that anything not specifically process related is being moved out of it and into /sys

Reply Score: 3

Wrong category
by dvzt on Thu 3rd Mar 2011 09:05 UTC
dvzt
Member since:
2008-10-23

This article should be in Linux category, not 'General Unix'. Unices have different /proc contents and use binary files, which have to be accessed with special command line tools. The info here is valid only for Linux.

Reply Score: 4