Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 28th Mar 2011 22:07 UTC, submitted by JCinSpain
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless I'm still reeling from the unrivalled epicness and awesomeness that is Sucker Punch in IMAX (just got home - do not miss this film), but now I'm back to boring old reality where we apparently care about pieces of plastic that go beep. So, anywho. The deal between Nokia and Microsoft has many Symbian and Qt developers worry about the future of their platforms. To address these concerns, Purnima Kochikar, vice president of Forum Nokia, has published an open letter describing Nokia's plans for Symbian, Qt, and Java for Series 40 devices. While the letter doesn't deliver any hard dates, the transition phase to Windows Phone 7 is set to 2011/2012.
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Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Mon 28th Mar 2011 22:27 UTC
shmerl
Member since:
2010-06-08

As usual, very vague statements about future of Meego in Nokia. But that's understandable - they have no idea about this future. I.e. it's undecided. Nokia will release one device running Harmattan with Meego API, but what will be after that - no one knows.

Reply Score: 1

This tells us nothing new
by joekiser on Mon 28th Mar 2011 22:40 UTC
joekiser
Member since:
2005-06-30

This article tells us nothing new...there is still no clear migration path for S40 users. Just a bunch of vague, reassuring statements so that we don't leave Nokia in droves. Are they saying it will be S40 on the low-end and WP7 for smartphones? I need something that does calls and texts and doesn't need to be charged every day, and S40 does this well. I thought that Nokia would just push Symbian to replace S40, and Meego to replace S60...now it looks like they will only have WP7 and nothing on the low end. At least Samsung has figured it out with Bada and Android. You simply can't give up the bulk of your market for something that's trendy but overkill for most people.

Edited 2011-03-28 22:44 UTC

Reply Score: 6

RE: This tells us nothing new
by vivainio on Tue 29th Mar 2011 21:04 UTC in reply to "This tells us nothing new"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

now it looks like they will only have WP7 and nothing on the low end.


S40 will still be around on the low end.

Reply Score: 3

v that movie
by booshire on Mon 28th Mar 2011 23:24 UTC
RE: that movie
by A420X on Tue 29th Mar 2011 00:53 UTC in reply to "that movie"
A420X Member since:
2011-02-02

pleasantries - A short polite conversation before the serious conversation; "Exchanging pleasantries"
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pleasantries

Reply Score: 4

RE: that movie
by kneufeld on Tue 29th Mar 2011 00:55 UTC in reply to "that movie"
kneufeld Member since:
2010-12-31

It doesn't need a reason, Sucker Punch is just that awesome.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: that movie
by FrankenFuss on Tue 29th Mar 2011 05:17 UTC in reply to "RE: that movie"
FrankenFuss Member since:
2009-08-05

Sucker Punch is TERRIBLE. You'll love it if you're a 14 year old boy...but if you're a grownup that likes a movie with a real script...then STAY AWAY!!

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: that movie
by sorpigal on Tue 29th Mar 2011 11:02 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: that movie"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

You are both accurate and unfair. Suckerpunch doesn't have anything like coherence, but there are some beautiful (if inconsequential) battle sequences. It gave me a very Heavy Metal vibe (minus the music); the people making it were going for awesome but didn't know how to get there, so some parts worked and some just fell flat. Anyone could enjoy it for what it was, but I certainly wouldn't call it a must-see film. I don't think I would have enjoyed it any more at 14 than I did at 29.

This was a script in need of a little more polishing before it was filmed to smooth some stilted dialog and either make clear what was going on (double framing is hard) or to tweak the plot and setting. I can't praise it as a whole.

I can, however, praise the gorgeous 'fantasy sequences' which are epicly awesome and remind me a lot of manga and anime, only live action. There's no question that the director is skilled and the effects are above top-notch.

Edited 2011-03-29 11:08 UTC

Reply Score: 2

kragil
Member since:
2006-01-04

Just look at
http://www.logitel.de/handys/obergruppen/betriebssysteme/windows-ph... (sorry in German)
for example. You will see that new WP7S phones are now selling for 239 Euro WITHOUT a contract.(Look for the UVP prices) Android phones with same hardware specs (sans the 8 or 16GB storage) easily cost 100 or even 200 Euro more.

My guess is because nobody wants them they have to sell them for cheap.

Nokia is so doomed.

Reply Score: 5

What I read in the open letter
by ebasconp on Mon 28th Mar 2011 23:44 UTC
ebasconp
Member since:
2006-05-09

"Dear developer,

please continue developing for our soon-to-be-killed platforms: your application will be useful until our users will migrate to Windows Phone 7; and in that moment you are going to be as forgotten as our platforms... thank you very much and... remember, continue developing for our platforms..."

Am I right?

Edited 2011-03-28 23:53 UTC

Reply Score: 11

RE: What I read in the open letter
by zizban on Tue 29th Mar 2011 02:05 UTC in reply to "What I read in the open letter"
zizban Member since:
2005-07-06

And since no one really buys Win 7 phones, we, Nokia, will be a shell of former selves by 2014.

Reply Score: 7

adkilla Member since:
2005-07-07

And eventually be bought over by Microsoft for a song.

Reply Score: 4

Comment by mappy
by mappy on Tue 29th Mar 2011 00:31 UTC
mappy
Member since:
2010-06-02

It would be great if Symbian trickled down to their lower-end phones, simply for the sake of native programmability, but personally i don't like touch interfaces - on the price of a common S40 or S60 phone, i wouldn't trust such a cheap touchscreen.

My S40 phone has a modern(-ish) browser, WiFi, IRC, VNC, SSH, RDP, a gameboy emulator and i wrote a DC++ client for it. It was ridiculously cheap and i couldn't be happier.

Reply Score: 5

Pimped and primped...
by mfaudzinr on Tue 29th Mar 2011 04:51 UTC
mfaudzinr
Member since:
2008-02-13

Pimped now primped up to be purchased by ... M$ - not so far fetched. Most probably that was the plan all along. I think Microsoft is definitely shopping for mobile hardware company. Now it's just playing the waiting game. Like a comodo dragon, after the 1st bite, let the poison do its wonders, then death - bon appetit!!!

Reply Score: 6

RE: Pimped and primped...
by milliamp on Tue 29th Mar 2011 09:30 UTC in reply to "Pimped and primped..."
milliamp Member since:
2011-03-29

Nokia has already moved to Windows Mobile and is paying Microsoft for the rights to do it.

Why buy the company when they already have the keys to the place?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Pimped and primped...
by mfaudzinr on Tue 29th Mar 2011 11:04 UTC in reply to "RE: Pimped and primped..."
mfaudzinr Member since:
2008-02-13

Eh... Isn't it the other way round, Microsoft paying Nokia for the rights to play in their sand pit? Nokia's to pay the license per phone sold?

Reply Score: 3

Sucker Punch
by Drumhellar on Tue 29th Mar 2011 06:19 UTC
Drumhellar
Member since:
2005-07-12

Thom, that movie was absolutely terrible. It's the worst movie I've seen since Wing Commander.

Apparently, the entire Internet agrees with me.

What is wrong with you?

Reply Score: 4

v What's with all the sour faces?
by tyrione on Tue 29th Mar 2011 07:12 UTC
Actually...
by tuzor on Tue 29th Mar 2011 09:22 UTC
tuzor
Member since:
2007-08-07

Thom, that movie was absolutely terrible. It's the worst movie I've seen since Wing Commander.
Apparently, the entire Internet agrees with me.

IMDB doesn't agree with you.
If you go into such a movie expecting to be amazed by the script then you don't really have a clue.

Been waiting for Sucker Punch with lots of anticipation; the reviews are bad but I'm certain that it's still good enough.

This is still Nokia's strength; they sell one million feature phones every day, and so far, have sold a staggering 600 million (!) Series 40 phones.

Actually, this strength is actually their biggest weakness.
The policy of old school phone makers to keep adding more bling to newer iterations of their phones while barely changing the OS and the experience is their biggest failure. Along comes Apple and shows them how it's done (and now Android and Palm) and the only thing they have left is these sales to keep them afloat.
They were just looking at capitalising on their success, milking the customers. They weren't looking into the future, they were being complacent and these sales are all they have until most people start using smartphones and they're just another company making Windows 7 phones.
They still have time until we get to this point but it's not looking good for them but I'm glad it's happening to them because they kept us back and they took advantage of their customers.
This is their wrong doing, a similar situation to the Music business where the Music Labels are to blame.

Edited 2011-03-29 09:24 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: Actually...
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 29th Mar 2011 09:41 UTC in reply to "Actually..."
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

If you go into such a movie expecting to be amazed by the script then you don't really have a clue.


And yet, you will be. That's the part that blew me away.

See Bob's review, he GETS it.

http://www.escapistmagazine.com/videos/view/escape-to-the-movies/29...

Reply Score: 0

RE: Actually...
by Carewolf on Tue 29th Mar 2011 10:10 UTC in reply to "Actually..."
Carewolf Member since:
2005-09-08

Funny i see it the other way. They didn't know how to thoroughly milk their customers, but then Apple came along and showed them how it is done.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Actually...
by tuzor on Tue 29th Mar 2011 10:22 UTC in reply to "RE: Actually..."
tuzor Member since:
2007-08-07

Funny i see it the other way. They didn't know how to thoroughly milk their customers, but then Apple came along and showed them how it is done.


Yeap you're absolutely right.
If it were up to nokia, today we would be using phones like this http://www.gsmarena.com/nokia_n92-1346.php

The only difference would be that it had a 12 megapixel camera and a higher res. screen and these devices mind you, weren't cheap.
But I guess people like you prefer living in the dark ages, given a chance you would probably be among the crowd wanting to burn Galileo for wanting to show you the truth.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Actually...
by Neolander on Tue 29th Mar 2011 10:28 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Actually..."
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Ah, because spending boatloads of money for a phone which didn't even include a proper keyboard, nor supported basic technology like MMS and 3G in its first iteration, was better...

It doesn't have to be one way or the other, you know ;)

Edited 2011-03-29 10:30 UTC

Reply Score: 8

RE[4]: Actually...
by tuzor on Tue 29th Mar 2011 11:22 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Actually..."
tuzor Member since:
2007-08-07

Ah, because spending boatloads of money for a phone which didn't even include a proper keyboard, nor supported basic technology like MMS and 3G in its first iteration, was better...

It doesn't have to be one way or the other, you know ;)


You also forgot to mention copy/paste, a native SDK etc etc.
Go dig up comments from Balmer, RIM and co.
There were so many back when the iPhone was introduced pointing out its flaws and predicting its demise... how right they were.

But oh wait, most of these issues were addressed in the years following.
On the other hand, 5 years later, Nokia is still selling junk.

Most of the features were left out for a reason, which is one thing Apple often excels in.
3G was left out due to battery issues, copy/paste/MMS so they could get it out asap and address them later.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Actually...
by spiderman on Tue 29th Mar 2011 12:33 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Actually..."
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

But oh wait, most of these issues were addressed in the years following.
On the other hand, 5 years later, Nokia is still selling junk.

Most of the features were left out for a reason, which is one thing Apple often excels in.
3G was left out due to battery issues, copy/paste/MMS so they could get it out asap and address them later.

Even 5 years after Apple launched the first iPhone, we still have to deal with nonsense like that. Apple does not "excels" at leaving out features. They are just slow to implement them. The iPhone is not the second coming of Jesus Christ FFS. When it is Apple, it is "for a reason". When it is not Apple, it is junk. What did they do to your brain?

Reply Score: 4

RE[6]: Actually...
by tuzor on Tue 29th Mar 2011 14:56 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Actually..."
tuzor Member since:
2007-08-07

The iPhone is a landmark in smartphone history, that's what it is.

You wouldn't have devices like the HTC incredible S had it not been for Apple's success with the iPhone. (Of course that goes both ways; Amazon's Cloud will have a similar effect, in that it will push Google and Apple to deliver on something similar asap, not 5 years down the road)
That success was due to a number of reasons and one of those reasons is leaving out 3G for example in the first iteration because the battery would be miserable (just like most 3g smartphones at the time).
This is what you don't get and what their competitors haven't understood since the age of the iPod.
The iPad was ridiculed at the start for not having a usb interface, a card reader, a camera etc. Do I need to go on or do you get it now?
Those things were left out intentionally.

Edited 2011-03-29 14:57 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Actually...
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 29th Mar 2011 15:08 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Actually..."
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

hose things were left out intentionally.


Yup. To sell you the next iteration.

Reply Score: 4

RE[7]: Actually...
by spiderman on Tue 29th Mar 2011 16:01 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Actually..."
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

I hope you are being paid by Apple. If not, you are either trolling or really brain washed. All smartphones have 3G since 2005 or so. There was no more battery problem than today. Most people just use GSM and activate 3G when necessary to save battery. If you don't then you should. This has not changed since 2005.
How did they put that shit into your brain? Why do you have to turn any fail into the best ever move when it is Apple?

Edited 2011-03-29 16:02 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE[5]: Actually...
by shmerl on Tue 29th Mar 2011 14:38 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Actually..."
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

> Most of the features were left out for a reason,
> which is one thing Apple often excels in.

It doesn't mean that it's good. Apple intentionally cripples their devices, and excels in DRM and obsessive control for whatever reason. It doesn't improve usability - on the contrary.

Why anyone needs some screwed iTunes to transfer files from a computer to a device? Why one can't use normal USB connection? Apple think they know why and they think everyone agrees. But I really don't care about crippled devices.

Edited 2011-03-29 14:39 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: Actually...
by MysterMask on Wed 30th Mar 2011 01:33 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Actually..."
MysterMask Member since:
2005-07-12

Apple intentionally cripples their devices, and excels in DRM and obsessive control for whatever reason. It doesn't improve usability - on the contrary.


If you want to see crippled devices due to DRM and obsessive control, look no further then plain old Symbian / Nokia.

Oh, well, they had copy/past, MMS, .., and horrible usability. Some techies still don't get it that pure feature lists don't count in the end. And given a Joe Average user, syncing a phone via USB / filesystem manually is under no circumstances better than something like iTunes.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Actually...
by shmerl on Wed 30th Mar 2011 06:34 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Actually..."
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Using USB is much better. Don't forget it is U-S-B. "U" standing for universal. It's an ubiquitous standard. Any sensible computer would have a USB port and it's OS would support it, being able to connect to other device with USB. Ditching USB for the sake of control cripples usability, limiting the use case to availability of certain service (iTunes), running only on certain OS. This is not at all ubiquitous and very far from universal. That proves the point basically. Apple's claims about usability are rubbish. Their main concern is paranoid power and control.

Edited 2011-03-30 06:37 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Actually...
by spiderman on Wed 30th Mar 2011 07:38 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Actually..."
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

And given a Joe Average user, syncing a phone via USB / filesystem manually is under no circumstances better than something like iTunes.

Oh my god! You are not serious, are you?

Reply Score: 3

RE[7]: Actually...
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 30th Mar 2011 08:42 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Actually..."
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

And given a Joe Average user, syncing a phone via USB / filesystem manually is under no circumstances better than something like iTunes.


Yes, because as we all know, it's an OR situation, and not AND.

And please, be reasonable. Even manually flipping the bits on an iPod's memory with magnets is more user-friendly than iTunes.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Actually...
by Soulbender on Tue 29th Mar 2011 18:04 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Actually..."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Most of the features were left out for a reason, which is one thing Apple often excels in.

3G was left out due to battery issues, copy/paste/MMS so they could get it out asap and address them later.


Amazing how much MS and Apple are alike, eh?

Reply Score: 3

RE[6]: Actually...
by superstoned on Wed 30th Mar 2011 14:40 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Actually..."
superstoned Member since:
2005-07-07

yes, it is funny to see someone bash Apple for not having copy-paste in the iPhone (years ago!) while MS dares to release a phone OS without copy-paste just months ago ;)

Reply Score: 2

Nokia's Future...
by TemporalBeing on Tue 29th Mar 2011 18:43 UTC
TemporalBeing
Member since:
2007-08-22

Honestly, WP7 is going to be just a small pothole in the future of Nokia. Expect to see that they'll deliver a couple WP7 phones and the sales won't do well compared to non-WP7 phones. Then expect them to pick up Android in its place, or at least continue offering Meego/Maemo and (yes) Symbian phones. Symbian is not likely going to go any where no matter how much money Microsoft tosses at Nokia.

No one has seen enough of Meego/Maemo to say whether it will succeed or not; but Android would be an easy thing for them to pick up if they needed to.

So it's just a small road bump in their history. One that Nokia accepted $1Billion to ride over.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Nokia's Future...
by leech on Tue 29th Mar 2011 22:39 UTC in reply to "Nokia's Future..."
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

I was thinking about this very thing yesterday.

Seriously, if you read between the lines "we plan on coming out with a few WP7 phones this year" and "MeeGo is going to be for our next 'distruption'" Really always kind of sounded to me like they were basically saying "well, we're not able to get MeeGo out the door soon enough, and we want something that is sensational and makes the world all say a collective 'WTF?' to get ourselves noticed again!"

Then BLAM! Out comes the new MeeGo phone. Nothing else makes (logical) sense. I mean what are they going to do, kill off their bread and butter (Symbian and Qt) and release another 'test' phone for MeeGo and just go with WP7? They would have no low to midrange phones, have to depend on Microsoft for any updates, and basically deficate on all of their developers / supporters.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Nokia's Future...
by dsmogor on Thu 31st Mar 2011 14:34 UTC in reply to "RE: Nokia's Future..."
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

Given the overarching services and ecosystem tune I woudln't be so optimistic. Elop seemed to suggest that it's the service revenue sharing with MS that they bet the company future on and the phones would only be bearer of that. Surely this could be extended to other platform than WP7 but I doubt MS would be happy to allow that.

Reply Score: 2

I'm lucky
by quique on Wed 30th Mar 2011 10:10 UTC
quique
Member since:
2005-07-07

I'm lucky. I was really excited about Meego, so much I had started learning Qt, and intended to base my Bachelor's Degree Final Project on it.

Fortunately, the Nokia-WP7 announcement came when I just had started, so I didn't lose too much.

Instead of investing time and effort on a dying environment, I'm now happily learning the Android platform.

In the future, Nokia's suicide will be studied at business schools...

Reply Score: 1

RE: I'm lucky
by ebasconp on Wed 30th Mar 2011 13:10 UTC in reply to "I'm lucky"
ebasconp Member since:
2006-05-09

Though Nokia left the "burning platform", as someone wrote somewhere, the platform [Qt] right now is "burning brighter than ever" ;)

Learn Qt, do something for Meego... Intel is still promoting it; C++ is more challenging to learn than Java and Qt is the right framework not just for mobile development, but for desktop development too.

Reply Score: 2

RE: I'm lucky
by dsmogor on Thu 31st Mar 2011 14:37 UTC in reply to "I'm lucky"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

WP7 will die only in case of 2 events:
- WP8 announcement
- MS demise.

MS will never ever let mobile market go away.
It's no doubt WP{whatever} will some day become successfull sharing hefty part of the market.
It's only painfull to see MS raping Europe (once) greatest tech company to provide them an easy path.

Edited 2011-03-31 14:43 UTC

Reply Score: 2