Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Sun 15th May 2011 06:16 UTC, submitted by Sebastian Anthony
Google "Both hardware- and software-wise, [Chromebooks] are nothing special: You can download Chrome OS's open source brother, Chromium OS, for free -- and at around $400 for a Chromebook, you would certainly expect some better hardware than what Samsung and Acer are offering. In fact, for around $300 you can get a cheaper and more powerful netbook with Windows 7 pre-installed -- and it only takes about 30 minutes to wipe Windows and install Chrome OS yourself."
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makes no sense
by evert on Sun 15th May 2011 06:54 UTC
evert
Member since:
2005-07-06

If you can install your own OS, then (1) you are smart enough to install a regular Linux distro, and (2) you probably like to install your own stuff, so Chrome is not the best option for you. Except, maybe, if you want to give te netbook to someone else.

Reply Score: 7

RE: makes no sense
by No it isnt on Sun 15th May 2011 10:19 UTC in reply to "makes no sense"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

You can install stuff in Chrome. Just visit the Chrome store and see -- they've even got Angry Birds now. Besides, a netbook isn't for all sorts of apps, it's for quick access to the web.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: makes no sense
by Spiron on Sun 15th May 2011 10:30 UTC in reply to "RE: makes no sense"
Spiron Member since:
2011-03-08

except a lot of people use them for offline work as they are both cheep and more portable than a conventional laptop. this is chromeOS big failer, the inability to let the user use ANY offline storage or programs.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: makes no sense
by No it isnt on Sun 15th May 2011 12:43 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: makes no sense"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

Wrong: http://www.thechromesource.com/tag/chrome-os-offline/

Edited 2011-05-15 12:43 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE: makes no sense
by Radio on Sun 15th May 2011 13:34 UTC in reply to "makes no sense"
Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

Except, maybe, if you want to give te netbook to someone else.

Exactly. I may want to give a computer to a friend or a family member and not have to spend too much time teaching or supportin them.

But then, I would install JoliOS, not ChromiumOS.

http://www.jolicloud.com/

Reply Score: 2

RE: makes no sense
by mkools on Sun 15th May 2011 17:30 UTC in reply to "makes no sense"
mkools Member since:
2005-10-11

And why would I pay for a Windows 7 license first and then install Chrome?

Reply Score: 4

Side note
by deathshadow on Sun 15th May 2011 07:05 UTC
deathshadow
Member since:
2005-07-12

Have I ever mentioned how annoying sites like "extremetech" are, where they seem to think that three paragraphs of content in a tiny little box in the middle of the screen is too much... since it cuts into the space available for adverts any user with a brain has blocked?

Of course that the site NEVER seems to actually finish loading... ever...

Reply Score: 3

RE: Side note
by Spiron on Sun 15th May 2011 07:30 UTC in reply to "Side note"
Spiron Member since:
2011-03-08

another thing about that site that pisses users off is the forced 1024x700. there are ways to make things align to the sides so that the site looks good whatever res you are looking at it through.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Side note
by Soulbender on Sun 15th May 2011 09:58 UTC in reply to "Side note"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I just naturally assumes that any site with "extreme" (or even lamer variations thereof) in the name sucks the devils cojones and are run, and frequented, by incompetent schmucks. Amazing how seldom I'm proven wrong.

Reply Score: 6

RE[2]: Side note
by fran on Sun 15th May 2011 15:55 UTC in reply to "RE: Side note"
fran Member since:
2010-08-06

just browsed extremetech a bit and it looks quite decent. Hardware reviews, diverse tech news, howto sections.
Symphathy to any new startup finding a catchy name.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Side note
by sbergman27 on Sun 15th May 2011 18:42 UTC in reply to "RE: Side note"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Well, each page features about a hundred words of the article with a "Next->" link below it, framed by a sea of various and sundry sidebars. I didn't dare turn my ad-blocker off. I only have a 15 megabit/s Internet connection.

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Side note
by JAlexoid on Mon 16th May 2011 13:00 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Side note"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Same here. But I didn't feel OK even sitting on a 300mbps pipe.

EDIT: Sorry, not pipe - "tube". Since "internet is a series of tubes".

Edited 2011-05-16 13:01 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Newsflash
by jbauer on Sun 15th May 2011 08:53 UTC
jbauer
Member since:
2005-07-06

It's said that some people have even managed to get the Chrome browser to run directly on Windows.

Reply Score: 8

LOL! No thanks
by NuxRo on Sun 15th May 2011 11:45 UTC
NuxRo
Member since:
2010-09-25

"so your first port of call should be the Chrome Web Store. After that, you should set up Google Cloud Print, connect to Google Music (if you have a beta invite!), and then... well... the web's your oyster!" <- LOL! Holy cow!

Reply Score: 2

numeric keypad
by fran on Sun 15th May 2011 14:03 UTC
fran
Member since:
2010-08-06

Sometimes I'm having trouble voting up an article.
This one for instance I click on the thumbs up icon and it does not work. Other times it does however..

Making your own Chromebook will be great.

Do anyone know if a laptop with numeric keypad will work with Chromebook because the key layouts of the chromebooks I saw are a bit different. Some business/clerical people for example specifically prefer laptops with numeric keypads.
Probably then an external USB keypad is also

Edited 2011-05-15 14:21 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: numeric keypad
by Zifre on Sun 15th May 2011 14:53 UTC in reply to "numeric keypad"
Zifre Member since:
2009-10-04

I assume it would work fine...

Reply Score: 2

Why?
by twitterfire on Sun 15th May 2011 20:58 UTC
twitterfire
Member since:
2008-09-11

I rather not make my own Chromebook, in fact I will never ever buy a Chromebook and I consider Chromebooks to be complete and utterly shit. At least for me.

To make a pun of what Serghei Brin said, I will not make my own Chromebook because I will torture me.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Why?
by JAlexoid on Mon 16th May 2011 13:04 UTC in reply to "Why?"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Duuude.... Chill... You're here, that means you're not an ordinary PC user. This isn't for you.

Reply Score: 5

Funny
by Fusion on Sun 15th May 2011 23:41 UTC
Fusion
Member since:
2005-07-18

what an interesting article to happen across while browsing on your recently-imaged bootleg chromebook. I just pulled my old Acer AspireOne (A150) out of my junk drawer last night for this purpose, and I have to say that the general user experience isn't too bad. I am one of the many who snagged a netbook on launch, and much like my nintendo Wii, used it for a few days and then let it collect dust; using it maybe 1-3x per year in an emergency.

As for OS's, sure you could throw a full-blown linux install or Windows7... and it might even run respectably fast. The thing is, if you're like me, having a full-blown OS on any of these is kind of a waste. I want a quick web browser session or SSH tunnel; Chromium/ChromeOS provides that, keeps my bookmarks, settings, webapps server-side (I refuse to use the "C" word), supports my hardware and just works with no fuss.

The article hit one thing right, though. If you buy a cheap netbook preloaded with Windows7, then you probably should wipe it --- and use the Win7 license on a *real* computer. ChromeOS gets the job done well enough.

I wouldn't go out to buy a netbook at this point of the game...but, hey, if you've already got one collecting dust...can't hurt to give it a whirl.

Reply Score: 1