Linked by lemur2 on Wed 22nd Jun 2011 22:30 UTC
Features, Office The Calligra Office Suite has announced its second snapshot release. The project, which is a fork of KOffice, is building a suite of productivity and creativity applications and is working towards its first formal end-user release due in October. The project is seeking feedback from end users particularly in the area of usability of the GUI. With this snapshot Calligra Office Words is claiming better compatibility with .docx than LibreOffice, and also claims to be approaching the best compatibility with legacy .doc formats.
Order by: Score:
I don't think it is a fork
by fretinator on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 01:56 UTC
fretinator
Member since:
2005-07-06

http://dot.kde.org/2010/12/06/kde-announces-calligra-suite

"The KDE community today announces the start of the Calligra Suite project, a continuation of the KOffice project. The new name reflects the wider value of the KOffice technology platform beyond just desktop office applications. With a new name for the Suite and new names for the productivity applications, the Calligra community welcomes a new stage in the development of free productivity and creativity applications for desktop and mobile devices."

Reply Score: 4

RE: I don't think it is a fork
by rob_mx on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 03:21 UTC in reply to "I don't think it is a fork"
rob_mx Member since:
2005-08-04

I think it is. Look at the comments in that link. And you can take a look at koffice.org, there is a blog entry about the different directions that developers were having. And because of that, they had to fork koffice into calligra.

Reply Score: 1

RE: I don't think it is a fork
by lemur2 on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 03:24 UTC in reply to "I don't think it is a fork"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

http://dot.kde.org/2010/12/06/kde-announces-calligra-suite "The KDE community today announces the start of the Calligra Suite project, a continuation of the KOffice project. The new name reflects the wider value of the KOffice technology platform beyond just desktop office applications. With a new name for the Suite and new names for the productivity applications, the Calligra community welcomes a new stage in the development of free productivity and creativity applications for desktop and mobile devices."


It depends, I suppose, on your definition of the word, and on your viewpoint.

Certainly it has been called a fork.

http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=ODg4NQ

http://aseigo.blogspot.com/2010/12/rose-by-any-other-name.html

So, let's start with some facts: KOffice has experienced an internal fork and in the process has been renamed "Calligra". The fork itself came about through unresolved differences between a member of the KOffice team and the rest of the members over how to manage both long term targets and day-to-day development. This eventually resulted in people coming to the conclusion that those differences were not only unresolved but also unresolvable. To call a one person schism a fork may seem a bit overly dramatic, but that's certainly how it felt to those involved and was not a triviality. Coming to a fork, the rest of the KOffice team took the opportunity of change to rethink various aspects, including the name.


Apparently it was a fork caused by only one person, but it was still enough to call it a fork.

Edited 2011-06-23 03:39 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: I don't think it is a fork
by lemur2 on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 12:50 UTC in reply to "I don't think it is a fork"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

http://dot.kde.org/2010/12/06/kde-announces-calligra-suite

"The KDE community today announces the start of the Calligra Suite project, a continuation of the KOffice project. The new name reflects the wider value of the KOffice technology platform beyond just desktop office applications. With a new name for the Suite and new names for the productivity applications, the Calligra community welcomes a new stage in the development of free productivity and creativity applications for desktop and mobile devices."


I think the best indication right now of the "split personality" schizophrenic nature of Calligra/KOffice can be seen on the download page for KOffice.

http://userbase.kde.org/KOffice/Download

Warning

There are two similar office suites, KOffice and Calligra, which originate from the same base but have separate development tracks. For each download, therefore, two links are given. Please take care to select the appropriate one for your office installation


Note

At the moment there is no agreement that after KOffice 2.3 series there will be subsequent releases of software called KOffice and who will develop it. Neither git repository called koffice nor calligra at git.kde.org is 100% official successor of the 2.3 series at the moment.


Note

Users interested in Kexi, Krita or KPlato application should be aware that after releasing them within KOffice 2.3 series these applications are developed by the same authors within the Calligra suite (moreover KPlato has been renamed to Plan). Thus, there will be no upgrade option for these applications within KOffice after series 2.3, regardless of the settlement on the continuation of KOffice.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: I don't think it is a fork
by fretinator on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 22:36 UTC in reply to "RE: I don't think it is a fork"
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

OK guys, I guess sort of a special fork, aka Spork.

BTW, I really wish the project(s) a lot of success. As mentioned previously, perhaps the engine could be interfaced to the web creating a Google Docs like experience.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: I don't think it is a fork
by cdude on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 23:59 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: I don't think it is a fork"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

http://www.webodf.org is interestng there. Seems to come from the same corner: http://www.fosdem.org/2011/interview/jos-van-den-oever

Reply Score: 2

GNOME
by Awasthi on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 03:49 UTC
Awasthi
Member since:
2011-06-23

can iuse this on GNOME?

Reply Score: 1

RE: GNOME
by lemur2 on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 04:36 UTC in reply to "GNOME"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

can iuse this on GNOME?


It isn't released yet, it is only a preview "snapshot", intended for users and developers wishing to help out in efforts to polish the GUI.

It is not due for release until October.

It has dependencies on Qt and KDE libraries. If you don't have these installed, then they will all be installed along with Calligra Office.

Having said all that, even though GNOME's support for integration of KDE applications is pretty minimal compared to KDE's support for GTK applications, nevertheless, yes, you can run it on GNOME.

Typically it will take a little longer to start than a native GNOME application, and it won't look at all like a native GNOME application, nevertheless you can run it. It won't run nearly as well and as seamlessly as it would under a KDE4 desktop, but it will run.

Be warned that KDE applications are philosophically different to GNOME apps. KDE applications tend to go for completeness at the expense of increasing complexity, whereas GNOME applications typically go for simplicity at the expense of completeness.

http://www.datamation.com/open-source/gnome-vs.-kde-apps-which-is-b...

However, in other areas, GNOME and KDE support rival applications whose differences are more than just a "G" or a "K" at the front of the name. In many cases, the applications that support the desktops are a direct reflection of opposing design philosophies.

...

Increasingly, the apps for each desktop show a distinct difference in design philosophy. These days, the typical GNOME app is usable at a glance, but limited to the most common functions. By contrast, the average KDE app is less user-friendly, but as complete as the imagination of its developers can make it, often supporting a wide array of plug-ins. Where a GNOME app often looks minimalist and highly organized, a KDE app often seems cluttered and unnecessarily complex -- at least at first glance.

There's something to be said for both design philosophies. But, fortunately, you don't have to choose. Although some users prefer to use only the native apps for their desktops, both GNOME and KDE ran each other's perfectly well, aside from a lag in startup time.


Personally, I prefer to install applications that can do whatever I might (one day) want them to.

YMMV.

Edited 2011-06-23 04:39 UTC

Reply Score: 6

holding things back
by stabbyjones on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 05:18 UTC
stabbyjones
Member since:
2008-04-15

The two things holding open office suites back for me is the poor docx conversion and horrid interfaces.

The old ms office style of menu after menu is overkill and a horrid waste of time. It doesn't have to be a ribbon, it just has to use the space better.

The final step is to make sure I can open my resume and it looks the same as it does in Word.

Technically this isn't totally their fault; but Microsoft makes it very easy for people to keep relying on Office. When they can't open documents they've created earlier and print out an exact replica they go right back to Office.

Office OpenXML really pisses me off...

Reply Score: 3

RE: holding things back
by lemur2 on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 05:45 UTC in reply to "holding things back"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

The two things holding open office suites back for me is the poor docx conversion and horrid interfaces. The old ms office style of menu after menu is overkill and a horrid waste of time. It doesn't have to be a ribbon, it just has to use the space better.


These are the very two areas that Calligra Office hopes to improve on. This aim was stated in the first snapshot release:

http://www.calligra-suite.org/news/calligra-announces-first-snapsho...
Our goal is to provide the best application suite on all platforms based on open standards. That is no small goal. We feel now that we have improved the foundation enough to start working seriously on improving the user experience. For this, we need the help of our users!

We will therefore release monthly snapshots, starting today, until the final release in October. These snapshots will be packaged by most major Linux distributions and instructions on how to install them will be provided too. We hope to get lots of feedback on the snapshots so that in October we can finally announce "Calligra is now end user ready and is the most usable free office suite of all".


For an indication of the state of play with regard to the Calligra Office suite GUI, there was a "Tour" posted at the time of the first snapshot release a month ago:

http://www.calligra-suite.org/news/calligra-2-4-snapshot-1-tour/

The GUI is one of the primary areas targetted for improvement, along with compatibility with MS Office, performance and layout. The existing GUI has widescreens in mind, and it is fairly consistent across the multiple applications.

The final step is to make sure I can open my resume and it looks the same as it does in Word. Technically this isn't totally their fault; but Microsoft makes it very easy for people to keep relying on Office. When they can't open documents they've created earlier and print out an exact replica they go right back to Office. Office OpenXML really pisses me off...


This is actually a double standard, if you think about it. MS Office is, after all, absolutely abysmal at opening documents and having it look the same as in the originating application if that originating application was not MS Office. Abysmal. Utterly hopeless.

Edited 2011-06-23 05:48 UTC

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: holding things back
by stabbyjones on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 06:50 UTC in reply to "RE: holding things back"
stabbyjones Member since:
2008-04-15

Tables and weird formatting just never seem to convert correctly. I'll install all the KDE libs just to get better docx conversion.

An included mobile version is a great idea too. I'm really looking forward to trying this out now!

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: holding things back
by cdude on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 23:43 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: holding things back"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

You filled bug reports for Tables and weird formatting?

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: holding things back
by 1c3d0g on Sun 26th Jun 2011 21:41 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: holding things back"
1c3d0g Member since:
2005-07-06

Many times. Doesn't matter, as it seems .doc conversion is not on the top of their priorities. This is why people are forced to stick to M$, which arguably has gotten much better over the last few releases.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: holding things back
by cdude on Mon 27th Jun 2011 23:57 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: holding things back"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

My experience is different. You should try to fill bug reports.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: holding things back
by bassbeast on Sat 25th Jun 2011 15:45 UTC in reply to "RE: holding things back"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

Ya know I hear this "meme" for lack of a better word, of MS Office being incompatible with itself but honestly I've never seen it and I mess with some seriously large docs with all kinds of funky formatting. I also have multiple versions of MS Office to deal with, with this machine I'm typing on running my beloved Office 2K while my home machine has Office 2K7 and my oldest has Office 2K3. I also had to deal with a project where I had people collaborating with Office 2K, 2K3, 2K7, and one on Office for Mac (2K4 I believe) and again ZERO problems.

Compare this to Open Office where I've actually seen family members get their grades dinged because OO.o turned out word salad when opened in Office 2K3, with broken headers and footers and when I was in school I myself got dinged because the teacher couldn't open an Open Office doc with MS Office without it looking like a shotgun splattered mess.

This is why I only give LibreOffice (I swear, what is it with FOSS and lousy names? Caligra? LibreOffice? Gimp? what's next, the Goatse video player?) to home users with the warning that as long as they are gonna print the results, or are just writing a doc for their own use? its all gravy. but if you are actually needing to share or collaborate with the outside world, or heaven forbid send a resume? Do NOT use a FOSS Office suite.

Oh and there is a DocX compatibility pack for MS Office 2K and 2K3 and it works quite well, I have NO trouble opening the files created with Office 2K7 and up. There are plenty of things to complain about when it comes to MSFT, but the quality of their business software ain't one of them. there is a reason why despite "free as in beer" people would rather buy or pirate MS Office, and that is because it does make a difference when you have to share your creation with the outside world.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: holding things back
by lemur2 on Sun 26th Jun 2011 03:31 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: holding things back"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Compare this to Open Office where I've actually seen family members get their grades dinged because OO.o turned out word salad when opened in Office 2K3, with broken headers and footers and when I was in school I myself got dinged because the teacher couldn't open an Open Office doc with MS Office without it looking like a shotgun splattered mess.


The only way you will get this is if you save your document in OpenOffice as an ODF document.

If you re-open such a document in OpenOffice, or any other OpenDocument-capable oofice suite except MS Office, then it will be absolutely fine.

MS Office, however, makes word salad of such documents. This is a failing of MS Office, it has piss-poor interoperability.

The simple solution for this is for OpenOffice/LibreOffice users to save documents (meant for interchange with other parties) as MS Office legacy formats (.doc, .xls etc). MS Office 2K3 does have a reasonable ability to open documents in these legacy formats. No word salad then.

A even better solution is to export documents meant for interchange with other as PDF files.

If you were interested in offering people decent advice, this is what you would tell them.

Edited 2011-06-26 03:31 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: holding things back
by Dave_K on Sun 26th Jun 2011 05:10 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: holding things back"
Dave_K Member since:
2005-11-16

The simple solution for this is for OpenOffice/LibreOffice users to save documents (meant for interchange with other parties) as MS Office legacy formats (.doc, .xls etc). MS Office 2K3 does have a reasonable ability to open documents in these legacy formats. No word salad then.


The handling of MS Office formats (legacy or otherwise) in OpenOffice/LibreOffice is not even close to being trustworthy. I tested this myself with OpenOffice not so long ago, using forms, manuals and training presentations in .doc and .ppt formats. These were all real world documents, mainly produced by the UK government.

Not a single one of them kept its formatting intact when opened in OpenOffice and saved back into an MS Office format. A couple of the .doc forms (a job application and grant funding proposal form IIRC) were badly mangled, with the formatting a mess and some of the content unreadable. One seemed to have been corrupted be the conversion, as it wasn't even possible to edit parts of it. The presentations lost various effects as well as having formatting issues.

Other documents were just mildly messed up, with formatting glitches and things out of alignment, but even that's unacceptable when documents are expected to be perfect. I'd have looked utterly unprofessional and incompetent if I'd worked on those documents in OpenOffice and sent them out without checking the results.

A even better solution is to export documents meant for interchange with other as PDF files.


That's not an option when people have specifically asked for work in a particular MS Office format.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: holding things back
by bassbeast on Sun 26th Jun 2011 07:29 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: holding things back"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

Thank you as that is EXACTLY what I was talking about! Not a single doc I saw mangled was saved in ODF, all were saved as .doc (the 97-2003 compatible setting I believe) in Open Office. I lost 15 points from a mangled Open Office doc, dropping the paper from an A to a C, and my oldest lost 10 points with the latest Libre office because of the same reason.

So it is as I said, if the ONLY thing you are doing is saving docs for your own use, or to print? Then FOSS Office Suites are fine. If you need to collaborate or heaven forbid send a resume (which BTW no HR dept will accept PDF, as their placement software uses keyword search that doesn't work on anything but .doc) to try to land your dream job? Do NOT use FOSS Office suites, as they WILL horribly mangle even the most simple formatting. It has gotten better than the days of OO.o 1.x-2.x but that is like saying your horse costs less to feed now that its dead.

If you are getting graded, or collaborating, or have any weight at all attached to a document? Buy MS Office, hell even the student edition will do. Because if you send a .doc done by Open/Libre Office it WILL look like garbage when opened in MS Office. Personally I wish it weren't so, as I give out libre Office on all new home builds and I hate how folks end up having to spend nearly $100 on Office Student just to get anything done, but ATM LO/OO just butchers the .doc format when opened in MS Office. If you don't believe me do as Dave K did above, download any reasonably complex doc from any government website, edit in LO/OO and then save as .doc and open in any MS Office. You'll see the thing gets all kinds of hosed.

Reply Score: 1

RE[6]: holding things back
by lemur2 on Sun 26th Jun 2011 09:10 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: holding things back"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Thank you as that is EXACTLY what I was talking about! Not a single doc I saw mangled was saved in ODF, all were saved as .doc (the 97-2003 compatible setting I believe) in Open Office. I lost 15 points from a mangled Open Office doc, dropping the paper from an A to a C, and my oldest lost 10 points with the latest Libre office because of the same reason.


My goodness you Americans are utterly spineless. I presume you are American, you clearly aren't Brazilian or anywhere sophisticated like that.

If my son or daughter handed up a file which they could demonstrate worked perfectly, and their teacher was so incompetent as to be unable to open it, especially as a PDF, and the teacher further then had the audacity to try to penalise my son or daughter for the teacher's incompetence, then I would petition to have that teacher sacked.

If the school resisted, I would take the case to the educational body that ran the school, and try to have the school's funding revoked.

I am the customer here, and I am right. It is not up to my son or daughter to have to teach the school how to do IT. The school has not one leg to stand on here, given that the technology they needed to be able to keep up with the competence of their own students was free software which would cost the school absolutely nothing to install.

Who is supposed to be teaching whom?

Who is paying for the service of providing the education, who is paying for the teacher's wages? ... I'll give you a hint, it isn't the school.

Edited 2011-06-26 09:19 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: holding things back
by lemur2 on Sun 26th Jun 2011 10:12 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: holding things back"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

So it is as I said, if the ONLY thing you are doing is saving docs for your own use, or to print? Then FOSS Office Suites are fine. If you need to collaborate or heaven forbid send a resume (which BTW no HR dept will accept PDF, as their placement software uses keyword search that doesn't work on anything but .doc) to try to land your dream job? Do NOT use FOSS Office suites, as they WILL horribly mangle even the most simple formatting. It has gotten better than the days of OO.o 1.x-2.x but that is like saying your horse costs less to feed now that its dead.

If you are getting graded, or collaborating, or have any weight at all attached to a document? Buy MS Office, hell even the student edition will do. Because if you send a .doc done by Open/Libre Office it WILL look like garbage when opened in MS Office. Personally I wish it weren't so, as I give out libre Office on all new home builds and I hate how folks end up having to spend nearly $100 on Office Student just to get anything done, but ATM LO/OO just butchers the .doc format when opened in MS Office. If you don't believe me do as Dave K did above, download any reasonably complex doc from any government website, edit in LO/OO and then save as .doc and open in any MS Office. You'll see the thing gets all kinds of hosed.


You have got it utterly backwards, completely the wrong way around.

Free software is completely able to generate and faithfully re-open the files, in many alternative formats, it is MS Office that almost utterly lacks the ability to do so. MS Office is abysmal at interoperability, it is utter garbage. If you are doing any kind of collaboration, MS Office should be avoided like the plague.

http://jimmywales.com/2004/10/21/free-knowledge-requires-free-softw...
"We produce a massive website filled with an astounding variety of knowledge. If we were to produce this website using proprietary software, we would place potentially insurmountable obstacles in front of those who would like to take our knowledge and do the same thing that we are doing. If you need to get permission from a proprietary software vendor in order to create your own copy of our works, then you are not really free.

For the case of proprietary file formats, the situation is even worse. It could be argued, though not persuasively I think, that as long as Wikimedia content can be loaded into some existing free software easily enough, then our internal use of proprietary software is not so bad. For proprietary formats, even this seductive fallacy does not apply. If we offer information in a proprietary or patent-encumbered format, then we are not just violating our own commitment to freedom, we are forcing others who want to use our allegedly free knowledge to themselves use proprietary software.

Finally, we should never forget as a community that we are the vanguard of a knowledge revolution that will transform the world. We are the leading edge innovators and leaders of what is becoming a global movement to free knowledge from proprietary constraints. 100 years from now, the idea of a proprietary textbook or encyclopedia will sound as quaint and remote as we now think of the use of leeches in medical science."


Your recommendations are 100% the wrong thing to do in the best interests of nearly everyone on the planet.

Edited 2011-06-26 10:15 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: holding things back
by saynte on Sun 26th Jun 2011 14:24 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: holding things back"
saynte Member since:
2007-12-10

I don't see how buying Office to produce .doc files is a bad recommendation. It is the most reliable way to do so, currently.

Reply Score: 1

RE[7]: holding things back
by Dave_K on Sun 26th Jun 2011 16:05 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: holding things back"
Dave_K Member since:
2005-11-16

You have got it utterly backwards, completely the wrong way around.

Free software is completely able to generate and faithfully re-open the files, in many alternative formats, it is MS Office that almost utterly lacks the ability to do so. MS Office is abysmal at interoperability, it is utter garbage. If you are doing any kind of collaboration, MS Office should be avoided like the plague.


Yes, in a perfect world everyone would be using free software with open file formats and there'd be no issues with compatibility, but that isn't the world we live in.

In the world of charities and government agencies that I deal with, every single organisation is using MS Office. Go to their websites and you'll find marketing materials in PDF, but everything intended to be editable is an MS Word document. MS Office formats are such a standard that they generally aren't even specified, it's just assumed that they're what you'll send.

Most of those people aren't even going to have heard of Open/LibreOffice. What response do you think I'd get if I insisted that they install another office suite just so that they can deal with the documents I'm sending to them?

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: holding things back
by 1c3d0g on Sun 26th Jun 2011 21:47 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: holding things back"
1c3d0g Member since:
2005-07-06

"Free software is completely able to generate and faithfully re-open the files, in many alternative formats,..."


Is there a name for this private fantasy world of yours?

People every day struggle to open even the most basic .doc files. For any business, this is completely unacceptable. Say what you want or believe what you want, but as long as 100% .doc conversion isn't made the #1 priority by these project, nobody will use these open source office suites for serious work. I'm sorry, but that's just the way it is.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: holding things back
by lemur2 on Sun 26th Jun 2011 09:17 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: holding things back"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

That's not an option when people have specifically asked for work in a particular MS Office format.


When it comes to my family's education, for which I pay school fees, the school is not the customer, I am.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: holding things back
by m_abs on Mon 27th Jun 2011 17:11 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: holding things back"
m_abs Member since:
2005-07-06

Ya know I hear this "meme" for lack of a better word, of MS Office being incompatible with itself but honestly I've never seen it and I mess with some seriously large docs with all kinds of funky formatting. I also have multiple versions of MS Office to deal with, with this machine I'm typing on running my beloved Office 2K while my home machine has Office 2K7 and my oldest has Office 2K3. I also had to deal with a project where I had people collaborating with Office 2K, 2K3, 2K7, and one on Office for Mac (2K4 I believe) and again ZERO problems.

You have been very lucky, I've had plenty of costly problems with just have people work on different installation of the same version of MSO.

Back then I wrote my thesis, the group had decided using MS Office 2k3 which were what the academy were using at the time. But we had no end of problems with work from people home computers.
Some members of the group had MS Office 2k3 in Danish and others had it in English, this made auto indexing troublesome because the tag for headline is localized.
If any of us added a new illustration it would almost always be moved when we opened the document at academy.

The last day before handing in the thesis we spend on correcting spelling, language and layout of the document. I can't remember exactly how much of that time we spend fixing layout problems, but it was a lot. One of the things we had to do was removing all headlines and adding them again, so we were sure that we could generate a full auto index. All images had to be repositioned so we were sure they were in the right place. And so on.

I realize this was many years ago and a very old version of MSO and I don't really know if it would have been better to have written the thesis in OOo, personality I wish we had taken the time to learn LaTex.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: holding things back
by phoenix on Mon 27th Jun 2011 17:43 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: holding things back"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

If you install all the security updates for MS Office XP and 2003, then you will no longer be able to open MS Word 2/6/95 documents. You won't even be able to open them in WordPad. Ran into this issue just last month as we have a teacher with several hundred Word 6.0 documents they've been using for years ... that they can no longer open on their Windows XP machine using MS Office 2003!!

What's even worse, though, is that MS Word can't open MS Works documents without paying MS for a "File compatibility pack".

And there's always the "Office X can't open Office X+1" documents without going through a lot of hoops.

At least with WordPerfect, any version after 7 can open any versions documents, due to the use of SGML for the document format. I've even personally tested that WP9 can open documents created and saved in WP14, without any issues. Try that with MS Office, without adding any extra packages.

Reply Score: 2

RE: holding things back
by Neolander on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 05:55 UTC in reply to "holding things back"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Give right clicks a chance. The popup menus really have improved a lot in recent releases of OO/LO, now toolbars and menus have become a secondary interface that does this job relatively well, at least in my typical workflow.

Edited 2011-06-23 05:59 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: holding things back
by lemur2 on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 06:07 UTC in reply to "RE: holding things back"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Give right clicks a chance. The popup menus really have improved a lot in recent releases of OO/LO, now toolbars and menus have become a secondary interface that does this job relatively well, at least in my typical workflow.


I have found this certainly to be true of LibreOffice. There is now a fair amount of functionality that can be easily accessed via the right-click mennu right there where you need it, no longer necessitating a round trip of the mouse up to the toolbar and back.

Old versions of KOffice relied a fair bit on drag & drop from the toolbars on to the document area. I hope they don't persist with that in Calligra Office.

Reply Score: 2

RE: holding things back
by Neolander on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 06:03 UTC in reply to "holding things back"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Oh, and another thing which I don't understand : do people absolutely need to be able to edit your resume ? If not, why don't you use PDF ?

Personally, I hate it when people send me final versions of documents in the doc format. Not only is it almost guaranteed that the formatting will be messed up (even different versions of Office open different versions of doc differently), it also forces me to fire up an office suite and drill through its visually crowded interface when I could be enjoying the simple and fast interface of most PDF readers.

PDF is the right tool in this context, I think.

Edited 2011-06-23 06:26 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: holding things back
by stabbyjones on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 06:47 UTC in reply to "RE: holding things back"
stabbyjones Member since:
2008-04-15

People don't need to edit it, I do. I keep it up do date and export to PDF when I need to send it to someone.

My current version was built off a Word template given to me by a friend in recruiting about 4 years ago now. It looks great in Word but has never formatted correctly in OpenOffice or now Libre Office. That's why I want better conversion for old documents.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: holding things back
by Neolander on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 06:53 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: holding things back"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Indeed, this is a valid use case ;) Although for something as short as a resume, I'd personally just redo the template once in OpenOffice, save it in doc 97, and be relatively happy with it forever. No need to keep broken documents around.

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: holding things back
by lemur2 on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 13:05 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: holding things back"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Indeed, this is a valid use case ;) Although for something as short as a resume, I'd personally just redo the template once in OpenOffice, save it in doc 97, and be relatively happy with it forever. No need to keep broken documents around.


I recently had occasion to update my CV, because of an upcoming internal vacancy. I worked on it at work (admittedly using Office 2003 on Windows XP) and at home using LibreOffice 3.3.2 running under Kubuntu Natty Narwhal.

It was rendered on-screen and printed exactly the same in either program.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: holding things back
by _txf_ on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 19:30 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: holding things back"
_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17

<troll> real men use latex for true formatting simplicity</troll>

trolling aside, latex is quite good for documents that you don't have to share in an editable state.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: holding things back
by Laurence on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 11:25 UTC in reply to "RE: holding things back"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Oh, and another thing which I don't understand : do people absolutely need to be able to edit your resume ? If not, why don't you use PDF ?

Personally, I hate it when people send me final versions of documents in the doc format. Not only is it almost guaranteed that the formatting will be messed up (even different versions of Office open different versions of doc differently), it also forces me to fire up an office suite and drill through its visually crowded interface when I could be enjoying the simple and fast interface of most PDF readers.

PDF is the right tool in this context, I think.

I agree with you in theory, however Job Agencies seem to need to edit it as everytime I sent them a PDF of my CV, I was asked to convert it as they couldn't edit it.

I'm not really sure the reasoning for this - I can only assume it's to do with how they store the data at their end. However it felt completely backwards to have TXT and RTF preferred over PDF.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: holding things back
by joekiser on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 12:40 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: holding things back"
joekiser Member since:
2005-06-30

"Oh, and another thing which I don't understand : do people absolutely need to be able to edit your resume ? If not, why don't you use PDF ?

Personally, I hate it when people send me final versions of documents in the doc format. Not only is it almost guaranteed that the formatting will be messed up (even different versions of Office open different versions of doc differently), it also forces me to fire up an office suite and drill through its visually crowded interface when I could be enjoying the simple and fast interface of most PDF readers.

PDF is the right tool in this context, I think.

I agree with you in theory, however Job Agencies seem to need to edit it as everytime I sent them a PDF of my CV, I was asked to convert it as they couldn't edit it.

I'm not really sure the reasoning for this - I can only assume it's to do with how they store the data at their end. However it felt completely backwards to have TXT and RTF preferred over PDF.
"

Every recruiting firm I've dealt with use some kind of indexing software that allows keyword searches, but isn't compatible with PDF. I wonder if it's the same program. So I've always kept two resumes -- a multiple page, .doc formatted resume with loads of keywords based on a template a recruiter gave me for search engines, and then a clean single-page PDF for in-person interviews.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: holding things back
by bert64 on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 12:41 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: holding things back"
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

They will often alter your CV depending on the requirements of their client... Often if they don't have any suitable people on the books, they will modify someone's cv to make it look like it might match, thus you get the interview but flunk it badly.

Personally i wouldn't want a modified version of my CV being sent to anyone, it would just make me look bad... And head hunters can be extremely unscrupulous.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: holding things back
by tanishaj on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 15:35 UTC in reply to "RE: holding things back"
tanishaj Member since:
2010-12-22

Oh, and another thing which I don't understand : do people absolutely need to be able to edit your resume ? If not, why don't you use PDF ?


I have not looked recently but my personal experience has certainly been that a lot of HR departments require resumes in Microsoft Word format (or even plain text).

A big part of this is just the non-technical and somewhat retarded culture of HR.

Another factor though is that these documents need to play well with whatever systems the companies are using internally. I suspect that many HR departments are applying some level or processing or parsing (scanning for keywords) to these resumes before people even look at them. The tools they are using may not be able to handle PDF as easily as Word files.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: holding things back
by twitterfire on Fri 24th Jun 2011 17:46 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: holding things back"
twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11


I have not looked recently but my personal experience has certainly been that a lot of HR departments require resumes in Microsoft Word format (or even plain text).

A big part of this is just the non-technical and somewhat retarded culture of HR.


What's non-technical or retarded? The fact that many HR departments know that MS Office is the most used office suite, the best way to exchange documents, and, to some extent, the best office suite from both a technical point of view and usability?

It would be retarded to require documents in other formats.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: holding things back
by sorpigal on Mon 27th Jun 2011 11:36 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: holding things back"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

What's non-technical or retarded? The fact that many HR departments know that MS Office is the most used office suite, the best way to exchange documents, and, to some extent, the best office suite from both a technical point of view and usability?


Are you a Microsoft shill? This reads like marketing and is patently false. MS Word format isn't the "Nest way to exchange documents" - it's been PDF or Postscript for many years, if you want it to look the same everywhere and want to be sure everyone can read it.

It would be retarded to require documents in other formats.

It would be idiotic to *require* a particular format, which they do. Better to require "A format we can read," that's all. This "Word .doc only" thing started back when many different office suites were popular and HR people were tired of receiving documents they could not even open. The rule probably isn't strictly enforced if you give them a resume in a format they can deal with. I don't know of any places offhand that actually refuse to open resumes that aren't .doc or .docx.

Reply Score: 2

RE: holding things back
by Dave_K on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 13:23 UTC in reply to "holding things back"
Dave_K Member since:
2005-11-16

The final step is to make sure I can open my resume and it looks the same as it does in Word. Technically this isn't totally their fault; but Microsoft makes it very easy for people to keep relying on Office. When they can't open documents they've created earlier and print out an exact replica they go right back to Office.


That's certainly why I keep on using MS Office. More significantly it's why just about every single organisation and charity I encounter in the real world uses MS Office, even when a free alternative would be perfectly usable and save them some money.

I can get used to a different interface (even if it's a bit of a mess) and I don't really need any extra features offered by commercial software. But I do need to be able to open MS Office documents received from other people, and send them back documents that they can open. Messed up formatting is unprofessional and unacceptable; documents need to look as they were intended to look.

The only software capable of doing that with reasonable reliability is MS Office itself. That gives it a huge advantage that I can't see disappearing any time soon.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: holding things back
by twitterfire on Fri 24th Jun 2011 17:42 UTC in reply to "RE: holding things back"
twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11


But I do need to be able to open MS Office documents received from other people, and send them back documents that they can open. Messed up formatting is unprofessional and unacceptable; documents need to look as they were intended to look.

The only software capable of doing that with reasonable reliability is MS Office itself. That gives it a huge advantage that I can't see disappearing any time soon.


That's the most important point when someone chooses an office suite: being able to use that suite to open documents sent by someone else and keep the same formatting and sending to someone else a document which that person can open and keep the same format.

Any other office suite beside MS Office -either free, open source or commercial - do a very, very poor job when opening doc, docx, xls and ppt. Which is totally unacceptable for anyone but open source zealots.

To add to the shame, MS Office runs faster on Linux under Wine than native Open Office or Libre Office. Ironically, the best office suite for Linux, is MS Office running under Wine or Vmware.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: holding things back
by lemur2 on Sat 25th Jun 2011 09:09 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: holding things back"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"
But I do need to be able to open MS Office documents received from other people, and send them back documents that they can open. Messed up formatting is unprofessional and unacceptable; documents need to look as they were intended to look.

The only software capable of doing that with reasonable reliability is MS Office itself. That gives it a huge advantage that I can't see disappearing any time soon.


That's the most important point when someone chooses an office suite: being able to use that suite to open documents sent by someone else and keep the same formatting and sending to someone else a document which that person can open and keep the same format.

Any other office suite beside MS Office -either free, open source or commercial - do a very, very poor job when opening doc, docx, xls and ppt. Which is totally unacceptable for anyone but open source zealots.

To add to the shame, MS Office runs faster on Linux under Wine than native Open Office or Libre Office. Ironically, the best office suite for Linux, is MS Office running under Wine or Vmware.
"

FUD. Bullshit. Absolute misinformation.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: holding things back
by Temcat on Sat 25th Jun 2011 21:28 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: holding things back"
Temcat Member since:
2005-10-18

My experience re MS Word under Wine was the same as parent's.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: holding things back
by lemur2 on Sun 26th Jun 2011 03:19 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: holding things back"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

My experience re MS Word under Wine was the same as parent's.


Yet my experience is that LibreOffice is significantly faster than OpenOffice and a little faster than MS Office under Wine.

http://www.betanews.com/article/LibreOffice-33-Fast-fun-and-functio...
"LibreOffice 3.3: Fast, fun and functional"

http://pclosmag.com/html/Issues/201103/page14.html
"One of the things that can't be seen in a list, that's been included in the reports of nearly all the reviewers, and that must be experienced, are the speed enhancements. Without a doubt, LibreOffice 3.3.0 launches much faster than previous versions of OpenOffice. LibreOffice 3.3.0 also feels much more responsive, with perceptible speed enhancements across all the applications in the office suite."


People needn't take my word for this, I have backup.

Edited 2011-06-26 03:20 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: holding things back
by Temcat on Sun 26th Jun 2011 10:10 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: holding things back"
Temcat Member since:
2005-10-18

Funny how you cite two articles as your "backup" none of which even mentions Wine and yet say people needn't take your word for this. Well, I happily take your word that LibreOffice is faster than MS Office under Wine for you. But it's a bit ridiculous trying to accuse other people of lying on that ground.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: holding things back
by lemur2 on Sun 26th Jun 2011 10:22 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: holding things back"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Funny how you cite two articles as your "backup" none of which even mentions Wine and yet say people needn't take your word for this. Well, I happily take your word that LibreOffice is faster than MS Office under Wine for you. But it's a bit ridiculous trying to accuse other people of lying on that ground.


My evidence is one-thousand-fold better than anything you, or anyone else, has provided to support other contentions that have been made.

Actually, come to think about it, my evidence is far more than a thousand times better, it is infinitely better. After all, any evidence, divided by zero evidence, yields a ratio of of infinity, in favour of my claims, for evidence provided.

Edited 2011-06-26 10:26 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: holding things back
by Temcat on Sat 25th Jun 2011 21:26 UTC in reply to "RE: holding things back"
Temcat Member since:
2005-10-18

IME Softmaker Office 2010 has flawless MS Office compatibility. It's not free, but cheap.

Reply Score: 2

Calligra Words' font rendering
by No it isnt on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 08:58 UTC
No it isnt
Member since:
2005-11-14

I check out kword and now Calligra Words from time to time, and it's been a long time since I thought it was 'promising'. The interface doesn't seem to be developed much at all, being overly simplistic while in its default layout wasting more space than any other app and showing less functionality than Abiword (I think it's meant to be more advanced).

The worst thing, though, is the font rendering. It doesn't seem to use the system font rendering, which works fine, but rather uses something completely different, with poor forms and those annoying rainbow patterns you could get back in the old days when LCD screens were as new as anti-aliasing. I can't imagine anyone wanting to work in this.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Calligra Words' font rendering
by lemur2 on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 09:45 UTC in reply to "Calligra Words' font rendering"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I check out kword and now Calligra Words from time to time, and it's been a long time since I thought it was 'promising'. The interface doesn't seem to be developed much at all, being overly simplistic while in its default layout wasting more space than any other app and showing less functionality than Abiword (I think it's meant to be more advanced).

The worst thing, though, is the font rendering. It doesn't seem to use the system font rendering, which works fine, but rather uses something completely different, with poor forms and those annoying rainbow patterns you could get back in the old days when LCD screens were as new as anti-aliasing. I can't imagine anyone wanting to work in this.


There has been no formal release, yet, of Calligra Words. There is therefore no basis of comparison, your issues were with KWord.

Incidentally, it was the KWord developer who caused the fork which resulted in Calligra Office.

Calligra Words, in conjunction with "flakes" from other Calligra Suite applications, is far more sophisticated than Abiword.

http://wiki.koffice.org/index.php?title=Flake
http://wiki.koffice.org/index.php?title=Libs/Flake/Accessibility
http://wiki.koffice.org/index.php?title=Libs/Flake/Connectors
http://wiki.koffice.org/index.php?title=Libs/Flake/Tools_And_Pointe...

In fact, Calligra Words is closer to DTP than word-processing.

http://wiki.koffice.org/index.php?title=KWord
http://wiki.koffice.org/index.php?title=KWord/Master_Documents
http://wiki.koffice.org/index.php?title=KWord/Scripting
http://wiki.koffice.org/index.php?title=Libs/KoText/Text_Plugins
http://wiki.koffice.org/index.php?title=Libs/KoText/Change_tracking

Waaaaaay more sophisticated than Abiword.

The Calligra Words GUI is indeed being worked on, and in fact bringing polish to the GUI is the main focus of these preview snapshots.

Font rendering in Calligra Words is done by Qt. Qt is KDE infrastructure, it has nothing to do with Calligra Words itself. The issue with Qt font rendering exposed by Calligra Words is fixed in Qt 4.8.

Qt 4.8 is in Technology Preview release status right now.

http://labs.qt.nokia.com/2011/05/24/technology-preview-of-qt-4-8-no...

Formal release won't be far away, it will certainly occur well before October when the first release of Calligra Words is due out.

Your points are all addressed.

Edited 2011-06-23 09:53 UTC

Reply Score: 4

No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

Thanks, great reply.

I actually have Calligra Words as packaged for the Archlinux kde-snapshots repository installed (KDE 4.7 beta). I'll take another look when Qt 4.8 is out.

Reply Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Thanks, great reply.


You are more than welcome.

I actually have Calligra Words as packaged for the Archlinux kde-snapshots repository installed (KDE 4.7 beta). I'll take another look when Qt 4.8 is out.


Even in this second preview snapshot I don't believe that the issue with the GUI has been addressed yet. They are still working on it. Some patience is still required.

It should only get better from this point onwards. Right now, apparently, the Calligra suite has more developers working on it than it has ever had in the past.

Reply Score: 3

fithisux Member since:
2006-01-22

Waaaaaay more sophisticated than Abiword.


whats your problem with abiword? In many cases I do not need msoffice functionality and work with abiword on windows. It is a good product. It misses collaboration functionality but I use it as a word processor. I am interested on trying calligra on mswindows (or much better reactos as long as the issues with kde on windows are resolved, I never understood why they support vc++, mingw (x)or mingw64 are enough). Yes I am an open source junky but I think I have a (practical) point here.

Reply Score: 3

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

" Waaaaaay more sophisticated than Abiword.
whats your problem with abiword? In many cases I do not need msoffice functionality and work with abiword on windows. It is a good product. It misses collaboration functionality but I use it as a word processor. I am interested on trying calligra on mswindows (or much better reactos as long as the issues with kde on windows are resolved, I never understood why they support vc++, mingw (x)or mingw64 are enough). Yes I am an open source junky but I think I have a (practical) point here. "

I have absolutely no problem with Abiword, it is indeed a good product. It does what it does very well. It is a far better option for people, IMO, than other products of approximately the same capability ... such as Wordpad. Everyone would without a doubt be far better off using Abiword rather than Wordpad.

This was the original poster's comment: "The interface doesn't seem to be developed much at all, being overly simplistic while in its default layout wasting more space than any other app and showing less functionality than Abiword (I think it's meant to be more advanced)."

Calligra Words certainly is more advanced than Abiword. While it is true to say that the existing KWord UI is not very discoverable and that it wastes space, my comment in reply was to point out that Calligra Words is considerably more sophisticated (more capable) than Abiword. In conjunction with the rest of the Calligra suite, it does a lot more. You are not really comparing Apples with Apples. It is like comparing Wordpad to Word ... they aren't even in the same ballpark.

This doesn't mean that Abiword is no good, Abiword is absolutely fine for what it does. It just means that Calligra Words and Abiword don't really compete with one another.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Calligra Words' font rendering
by Elv13 on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 23:52 UTC in reply to "Calligra Words' font rendering"
Elv13 Member since:
2006-06-12

Its not using something completely different, it's a bug in Qt making it look terrible. You have to turn off hinting and anti aliasing so it can look "normal". The bug probably will never be fixed as both Calligra and Nokia are throwing the ball at each other since years.

Reply Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Its not using something completely different, it's a bug in Qt making it look terrible. You have to turn off hinting and anti aliasing so it can look "normal". The bug probably will never be fixed as both Calligra and Nokia are throwing the ball at each other since years.


This issue should be fixed by the release of Qt 4.8.

http://www.calligra-suite.org/news/calligra-suite-the-first-three-m...

Words: the main thing here is the huge effort by Casper Boemann who, often coding until early in the morning, is revamping the text layout engine. The old text layout engine was probably about the worst thing and really didn’t support most of the features users have come to expect of word processors since Word for Windows 2.0. And it wasn’t stable: some documents would make the layout engine go berserk, adding pages or continuously moving content about. The new text layout engine is now progressing nicely and already supports things like nested tables, proper drop caps, real unittesting… The layout engine is also encapsulated in a library now. Now when Qt 4.8 comes out and fixes the font rendering issues — and there’s good hope! — then Calligra Words will be really up to scratch!


(BTW: The text layout issues were probably the very thing that created the Calligra fork).

See also:
http://labs.qt.nokia.com/2011/03/14/hint-hint-nudge-nudge-say-no-mo...

Edited 2011-06-24 00:35 UTC

Reply Score: 2

project_2501
Member since:
2006-03-20

This really needs a Windows release. The benefits would be significant - real competition on the Windows desktop.

Also a web accessible online "cloud" webapp would be great too .. and because of the modular nature and "engine" this should be do-able.

Reply Score: 5

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

This really needs a Windows release. The benefits would be significant - real competition on the Windows desktop. Also a web accessible online "cloud" webapp would be great too .. and because of the modular nature and "engine" this should be do-able.


This topic is discussed here:
http://forum.kde.org/viewtopic.php?f=203&t=94347&sid=f6796255b7a13e...

The answer seems to be that Calligra has dependencies on Qt and on kdelibs but not on the KDE Plasma desktop itself. Porting to other platforms is therefore possible, but it would involve quite a bit more work than porting an application that depended only on Qt. Significant parts of kdelibs would have to be re-implemented for the other platform.

Apparently there is only a very small team (perhaps one or two people) working on it. Don't expect it to happen real soon.

Edited 2011-06-24 03:31 UTC

Reply Score: 2

cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

afaik Calligra compiles fine with msvc 2010 and mingw. So does Qt and kdelibs.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by superstoned
by superstoned on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 17:14 UTC
superstoned
Member since:
2005-07-07

Interesting rumour: the N9 office suite is based on Calligra's core engine ;)

Reply Score: 3

No Windows version yet
by libray on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 20:46 UTC
libray
Member since:
2005-08-27

This is the message in the download site:

KOffice or Calligra are not in the KDE Windows installer. Checked today, 23.06.2011.

Reply Score: 2

RE: No Windows version yet
by cdude on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 22:17 UTC in reply to "No Windows version yet"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

Will probably come once in release-mode.

Reply Score: 1

Calligra has eight GSoC 2011 projects
by lemur2 on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 23:40 UTC
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

http://www.calligra-suite.org/news/its-summer-already/

April 21: "Yesterday, the selected projects for Google Summer of Code were announced. KDE has 51 slots this year. Out of those 51 slots, 8 are for Calligra. We’re very happy to welcome so many students to our project!"

There were a number of ideas that did not get selected for GSoC, but at least these 8 did. With luck some of this work may find its way into the first release in October.

Reply Score: 2

It's not Calligra Office...
by boudewijn on Mon 27th Jun 2011 12:45 UTC
boudewijn
Member since:
2006-03-05

But called the Calligra Suite -- and not for nothing. There's much more than just office applications in the suite. And at least Krita is already used by professional artists for their work :-). Plan is pretty unique in the free software world, as is Kexi, actually. Lots of good stuff in Calligra, making it well worth checking out.

As for the whole train wreck of a "if it's not by MS, it's not good enough" discussion... We know we've got a way to go, we don't support export to either the binary or the ooxml Microsoft Office file formats yet. So for these documents, it's viewing or conversion to OpenDocument. Personally, I never have had any trouble with OpenOffice to share .doc documents with editors or sending in my CV as .doc created with OpenOffice -- but maybe my CV (though very impressive content-wise, of course) isn't in a complicated enough format.

Reply Score: 2