Linked by Jennimc on Wed 13th Jul 2011 22:39 UTC
Microsoft "InfoWorld's Woody Leonhard uncovered the fact that Microsoft is paying some organizations to adopt its Office 365 cloud service, mostly in funds that Microsoft earmarks for their customers' migration costs and other required consulting. Although this raised the eyebrows of some bloggers - and I'm sure Google wasn't thrilled - I think this is both smart and ethical. Here's why."
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Why Tech reporters get paid.
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 13th Jul 2011 23:33 UTC
Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

They write articles like this that correctly cover the business angle of technology, while totally ignoring the technology in question.

Office 365 stinks. There is no point in "migrating" to it, as the service can't really do much.

Businesses would be better off waiting till version 3.0

Edited 2011-07-13 23:36 UTC

Reply Score: 7

Smart - yes, ethical - no.
by JLF65 on Thu 14th Jul 2011 00:48 UTC
JLF65
Member since:
2005-07-06

"Microsoft benefits from subsidizing the switch because it can capture a customer that will use that product for many years."

That's called lock-in and is a common tactic by monopolies like MS. It's BAD for customers and the public in general. It's clearly unethical, and sometimes illegal. Just MS up to its old shenanigans.

Reply Score: 11

RE: Smart - yes, ethical - no.
by JAlexoid on Thu 14th Jul 2011 19:18 UTC in reply to "Smart - yes, ethical - no."
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

That just shows how "both smart and ethical" David Linthicum is on this point.

I mean, using the word bribe and ethical in the same context is just not right.

Reply Score: 2

As long as there is an API...
by sukru on Thu 14th Jul 2011 06:02 UTC
sukru
Member since:
2006-11-19

The good thing about current state of the "cloud" systems are they usually come with an easy to use API. Actually there are already sites compiling thousands of them:
http://www.programmableweb.com/api/dropbox

Thus as long as we have access to a reasonable API, switching to another provider would be a possible, by means of a custom migration software.

Edited 2011-07-14 06:03 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: As long as there is an API...
by Laurence on Thu 14th Jul 2011 07:12 UTC in reply to "As long as there is an API..."
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

The good thing about current state of the "cloud" systems are they usually come with an easy to use API. Actually there are already sites compiling thousands of them:
http://www.programmableweb.com/api/dropbox

Thus as long as we have access to a reasonable API, switching to another provider would be a possible, by means of a custom migration software.


That's wishful thinking but history has already taught us that not to be the case when comparing desktop software. Despite the abundance of APIs, many cool features are kept secret.

Besides (and from a personal perspective), what's the point in switching from one cloud to another if you're only going to use the same APIs? Effectively you're still dependent on the same originating service. Thus pretty much all you're doing is changing your applications skin.

Reply Score: 3

..
by fran on Thu 14th Jul 2011 14:11 UTC
fran
Member since:
2010-08-06

no thug life rap music in the office please

Reply Score: 2

no such thing
by TechGeek on Thu 14th Jul 2011 14:31 UTC
TechGeek
Member since:
2006-01-14

There is no such thing as a free lunch with Microsoft. You know they will make their money one way or the other.

Reply Score: 3

RE: no such thing
by fran on Thu 14th Jul 2011 16:11 UTC in reply to "no such thing"
fran Member since:
2010-08-06

Yeh that was a bit harsh, I mean it is capitalist society after all.

I'm happy Microsoft is not restricting Office 365 to Internet explorer.. Linux users will thus for the first time be able to use MS Office without running wine.
I was also surprised by the low monthly fees that start from $6 a month.

And also on MS commitment to make JavaScript a major platform on windows 8. This would surely make apps a lot more portable.

You can argue that this is not altruism but because market demands it...it's nonetheless very good news.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: no such thing
by TechGeek on Thu 14th Jul 2011 18:57 UTC in reply to "RE: no such thing"
TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

I am not bashing Microsoft because they want to make money. They have a long history of anti competitive behavior and this is pretty much on par with that. They are paying to get customers. Thats pretty much in line with charging more for Windows to OEMs who sell other OS's on their computers. If it was a decent product, they wouldn't have to bribe people to use it.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: no such thing
by fran on Fri 15th Jul 2011 12:13 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: no such thing"
fran Member since:
2010-08-06

got me wrong, did not mean you where harsh.
agreed to what you said and referred to my own talking smack joke.

Reply Score: 2

ant-icompetitive behaviour?
by project_2501 on Thu 14th Jul 2011 18:43 UTC
project_2501
Member since:
2006-03-20

I thought there were laws against ant-icompetitive behaviour?

Reply Score: 2

microsoft cloud
by Mellin on Fri 15th Jul 2011 13:35 UTC
Mellin
Member since:
2005-07-06

microsoft cloud means homeland security can copy and read everything even european documents and files

Reply Score: 3