Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 28th Jul 2011 22:08 UTC
Java "Java SE 7 is officially released today! After nearly five years of collaboration within the worldwide Java community, Java Platform, Standard Edition is ready for download! It's an important step in Java’s evolution. Thanks to everyone who suggested features, reviewed specs, argued on mailing lists, talked about Java 7 at your JUG meeting, submitted bugs, wrote blogs and tweeted about #java7."
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Really?
by Tuishimi on Thu 28th Jul 2011 23:28 UTC
Tuishimi
Member since:
2005-07-06

I thought it was a bit of a letdown.

Reply Score: 1

5 years
by WorknMan on Fri 29th Jul 2011 02:32 UTC
WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

It took them 5 years to get from version 6 to 7. As I don't follow Java's development, what took them so long?

Reply Score: 2

RE: 5 years
by moondevil on Fri 29th Jul 2011 05:49 UTC in reply to "5 years"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

It took them 5 years to get from version 6 to 7. As I don't follow Java's development, what took them so long?


Sun's lack of money and resources.

A little disorientation in what features they should invest.

Political discussions inside the JCP regarding the accessibility to the TCK for open source implementations.

Sun being acquired by Oracle.

It is a long time, but actually I know of IT projects only now upgrading to Java 5 or 6. Similar cases on the .Net world with projects moving .Net 2.0 or .Net 3.0.

Many IT projects are really slow, so actually Java's slow pace is not that bad. Developers always need time to get to know new language features and what would be the best practices.

Reply Score: 7

RE[2]: 5 years
by Tuishimi on Fri 29th Jul 2011 17:31 UTC in reply to "RE: 5 years"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06


A little disorientation in what features they should invest.

...

Sun being acquired by Oracle.


The combination of these two... Especially features.

I think they had a chance to really evolve the language but chose the safest route. The most earth shattering new feature is the switch statement update.

I suppose performance could be a part of their decision to not support some newer concepts (like closures)... but I was really hoping for more.

Reply Score: 2

Congrats
by Slambert666 on Fri 29th Jul 2011 02:39 UTC
Slambert666
Member since:
2008-10-30

First off, I think that Java has been somewhat stagnant the last couple of years, and it is good to see that something is happening again. Congratulations to the team behind the release....

BUT, reading through the release notes I find this:

Virtualization:

All supported platforms are also supported when virtualized in a supported hypervisor, except where noted. Supported hypervisors are: Oracle VM 2.2, VirtualBox 3.x, 4.x, Solaris Containers, and Solaris LDOMs.

VMware and Microsoft Hypervisor are not supported.

WTF. Are they crazy?

Reply Score: 3

RE: Congrats
by moondevil on Fri 29th Jul 2011 05:52 UTC in reply to "Congrats"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Missed that.

Well on my case I don't care. I find it a bit stupid this trend nowadays of having VMs inside VMs, inside VMs...

Anyway it reminds me an issue Borland had with the Borland C++ license, where for some time they forbade buyers to use Borland C++ to developer compilers!

This was in the early 90's. Does someone remember which version it was?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Congrats
by senshikaze on Fri 29th Jul 2011 13:54 UTC in reply to "RE: Congrats"
senshikaze Member since:
2011-03-08

Well on my case I don't care. I find it a bit stupid this trend nowadays of having VMs inside VMs, inside VMs...


This is a thing? There are people who do this? Why?! What possible performance advantages could you get?

Or do you mean like how VMWare is a VM (hardware virtualization) and Java is a VM (software emulation)?

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Congrats
by moondevil on Sat 30th Jul 2011 17:38 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Congrats"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

No I mean things like having multiple VMWare instances per blade.

With multiple instances of Websphere, Database and load balancers.

Only to save hardware costs.

Reply Score: 2

!!!
by draethus on Fri 29th Jul 2011 07:45 UTC
draethus
Member since:
2006-08-02

Great news. Java 7 should support Linux a lot better, due to patches Red Hat and the community put in. For one, file drag and drop will finally work.

Other things to look forward to are better performance, lower memory usage on 64 bit, soft real-time garbage collection, and awesome new APIs for native file I/O, asynchronous I/O, fork/join, better exception handling (no more try/catch(IOException) to close() something cleanly), and plenty I haven't discovered yet!

Reply Score: 3

I fancy the NIO.2
by wigry on Fri 29th Jul 2011 12:31 UTC
wigry
Member since:
2008-10-09

I like the native filesystem operations support via NIO2 best. Actually had a need for such a thing in one project half a year ago but solved it differently.

Although must say, that for mission critical projects I am not considering the upgrade to Java 7 for quite some time. Java 6 works very well.

UPDATE - Thats why I hold off the new Java:
http://www.h-online.com/open/news/item/Java-7-paralyses-Lucene-and-...

Quote: The hotspot compiler in the recently released Java 7 has a defective optimiser that can cause flawed loops, according to a warning published by the Apache Software Foundation. As a result, the Java Virtual Machine can crash, and calculations can produce incorrect results.

Ouch... How such a thing got through the release process...

Edited 2011-07-29 12:44 UTC

Reply Score: 1

Oh boy!
by Drunkula on Fri 29th Jul 2011 13:24 UTC
Drunkula
Member since:
2009-09-03

Another version or JRE and/or JDK to gunk up computers! Seriously though I wonder how backward compatible it will be.

Reply Score: 1

Where's the docs?
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Fri 29th Jul 2011 15:03 UTC
Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

Java isn't bad. I don't mean to beat up on the language at all. But, compare it to other lanugeages that don't have quite the backing of a company such as oracle/Sun. When they release a new version, how easy is it to find a change log, or an in depth tour of the new features.

Where is any of that for Java 7? I had to go clicking through their site to just find this page:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/documentation/api-jsp...

Which has the wonderfully up-to-date notice that Java 7 is not released yet. Great jorb Sun/Oracle!

Reply Score: 3

RE: Where's the docs?
by davmac on Mon 1st Aug 2011 09:11 UTC in reply to "Where's the docs? "
davmac Member since:
2008-08-21

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/jdk7-relnotes-429209....

"Java SE downloads" --> "release notes". Not really that hard.

Reply Score: 1

Java 7 and Android
by l_tamas on Fri 29th Jul 2011 17:53 UTC
l_tamas
Member since:
2011-02-27

I am wondering whether the new APIs will be supported on Android in the future.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Java 7 and Android
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Sat 30th Jul 2011 05:04 UTC in reply to "Java 7 and Android"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Well, considering the oracle/Google lawsuit. I'd say not any time soon.

Reply Score: 2

Closures
by vivainio on Sun 31st Jul 2011 21:39 UTC
vivainio
Member since:
2008-12-26

So, no closured coming to Java?

Reply Score: 2

Unicode in properties files
by vodoomoth on Mon 1st Aug 2011 20:29 UTC
vodoomoth
Member since:
2010-03-30

This is something that I missed some time back. Is it available yet? Or one still has to use a custom library?

Reply Score: 2